Molecular Nutrition & Food Research

Cover image for Vol. 61 Issue 5

Edited By: Hans-Ulrich Humpf

Impact Factor: 4.551

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 5/125 (Food Science & Technology)

Online ISSN: 1613-4133

Special Issues of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research

2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

Reviews Part II 2016
Editor: Hans-Ulrich Humpf
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2016, 60(8).

>In this issue you will find the second 2016 annual collection of ‘Review’ articles covering various aspects of molecular nutrition and food research.

Nutrition and Cancer
Editors: Vaqar Mustafa Adhami, Hasan Mukhtar
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2016, 60(6).

The purpose of this special issue of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research is to provide to the reader an update on the role of nutrition in causing and preventing cancer. The issue contains eight original articles and 15 reviews and covers a wide range of articles that span the whole gamut of work being undertaken in the area of “diet and nutrition”.

Obesity: dysfunction, regulation and control & Reviews 2016
Editor: Andrew McAinch
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2016, 60(1).

In this issue you will find the 2016 annual collection of ‘Review’ articles, with a special focus on obesity.

2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

Reviews Part II 2015
Editor: Hans-Ulrich Humpf
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2015, 59(7).

In this issue you will find the 2015 annual collection of ‘Review’ articles, part II, covering various aspects of molecular nutrition and food research. It provides 12 comprehensive and critical reviews/meta-analyses written by experts in the field. We hope that you will find this collection of articles interesting and stimulating

Reviews Part I 2015
Editor: Hans-Ulrich Humpf
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2015, 59(1).

In this issue you will find the 2015 annual collection of ‘Review’ articles, part I, covering various aspects of molecular nutrition and food research. It provides 13 comprehensive and critical reviews/meta-analyses written by experts in the field. We hope that you will find this collection of articles interesting and stimulating

2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

Vitamin K Conundrums and Reviews Part II 2014
Guest Editor: Maret G. Traber
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2014, 58(8).

Vitamin K, known as the “Koagulation” vitamin, was discovered in 1929 because deficiency of this vitamin caused bleeding in rats; it is now recognized to be a critical co-factor for the gamma-carboxylation of vitamin K-dependent proteins. The 17 known vitamin K-dependent proteins regulate calcium in the blood-clotting cascade, artery walls, bone matrix and brain to mention a few sites of action. The mechanism for vitamin K function is well known. Vitamin K is used by vitamin K carboxylase (GGCX) to carboxylate glutamic acids (Glu) to γ-carboxyglutamic acids (Gla) in vitamin K-dependent proteins. Gla are necessary for the calcium-chelating function of vitamin K-dependent proteins. Thus, it is now widely appreciated that vitamin K is essential for calcium regulation.

Reviews 2014
Editor: Hans-Ulrich Humpf
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2014, 58(1).

In this issue you will find the 2014 annual collection of ‘Review’ articles covering various aspects of molecular nutrition and food research. It provides 15 comprehensive and critical reviews written by experts in the field. We hope that you will find this collection of articles interesting and stimulating.

2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

Curcumin: Recent Insights, Novel Developments, New Challenges
Editor: Andreas Gescher
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2013, 57(9).

The curry spice turmeric and its major constituent curcumin have been ingested as part of the human diet for centuries and long been suspected to impart beneficial effects on human health. The aim of this special issue is to present a “snapshot” of state-of-the-art curcumin research in 2013. It comprises five reviews and ten papers with original results. What are the insights imparted in these contributions?

Lipidomics: Approaches and Applications in Nutrition Research
Editor: Claus Schneider
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2013, 57(8).

“Lipidomics” in a simple definition is the approach to quantify all lipids present in a confined biological entity. This can be an entire organ, a plasma sample, or a plate of cultured cells. This issue of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research provides an up-to-date overview of approaches and applications of lipidomics in nutrition research.

Cocoa and Human Health
Editor: Joshua D. Lambert
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2013, 57(6).

Cocoa, derived from the seeds of Theobroma cacao (Malvaceae), is a common food ingredient with worldwide popularity. Although frequently associated with foods such as chocolate which can contain high levels of fat and sugar, increasing evidence from laboratory, epidemiological, and human intervention studies indicate that cocoa may have beneficial effects in a number of chronic disease conditions including cardiovascular disease and other inflammation and oxidative stress-driven pathologies.

Folate and Health - Present and Future
Editors: Cornelia M. Ulrich, Joshua W. Miller
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2013, 57(4).

This special issue highlights human and experimental studies, as well as methodological research and mathematical modeling approaches to address a multitude of questions linking folate to health and disease. Key issues that are explored include the modeling of folate metabolism, the response to folic acid supplementation as influenced by genetic factors and pregnancy, the influence of folate on molecular aspects of pregnancy outcomes and development, and the role of folate in intestinal and colorectal cancers. These studies reflect the present and future of the active and vibrant area that is folate research.

Reviews 2013
Editor: Hans-Ulrich Humpf
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2013, 57(1).

In this issue you will find the 2013 annual collection of ‘Review’ articles covering various aspects of molecular nutrition and food research. It provides 13 comprehensive and critical reviews written by experts in the field. We hope that you will find this collection of articles interesting and stimulating.

2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 |2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

Nutrition and Atherosclerosis
Editor: Baukje de Roos
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2012, 56(7).

In the past two decades, the understanding of how dietary compounds influence risk of coronary heart disease has grown substantially, mainly through studies investigating the molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis as well as the execution of carefully controlled dietary intervention studies. A number of studies in this Special Issue of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research show novel ways by which fatty acids, bioactive plant compounds, and micronutrients not only affect lipoprotein metabolism, but also have the ability to modulate important antiinflammatory and antioxidant pathways.

Carotenoids in Nutrition and Health - Developments and Future Trends
Editor: Wilhelm Stahl
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2012, 56(2).

Dietary intake of carotenoids has been associated with a decreased risk for cancer, cardiovascular events, ophthalmological disorders, and age related cognitive diseases. Intervention with carotenes and xanthophylls was used to ameliorate the symptoms of severe skin diseases and successfully applied to prevent UV-induced skin damage. beta-Carotene and to some extent other provitamin A carotenoids are important sources for retinol and contribute to our vitamin A supply, although the contributing fraction and conversion factors are still a matter of debate. Read this special issue to find out about a multitude of topics - from basic research in chemistry, nutritional biochemistry to molecular biology also evaluating nutritional and clinical effects of food constituents, particularly carotenoids but also with increasing importance their non-vitamin A metabolites and breakdown products.

Reviews 2012
Editors: Peter Schreier, Hans-Ulrich Humpf
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2012, 56(1).

In this issue you will find the 2012 annual collection of ‘Review’ articles covering various aspects of molecular nutrition and food research. It provides 13 comprehensive and critical reviews written by experts in the field. We hope that you will find this collection of articles interesting and stimulating.

2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 |2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

Lipids as Effectors
Editor: Chi-Tang Ho
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2011, 55(S2).

Lipid, one of the major structural components of living cells is also the most concentrated source of energy of all the nutrients. Lipids have also been recognized as signaling molecules. Lipid molecules such as fatty acids, eicosanoids, phosphoinositides and sphingolipids are known to control important cellular processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis and metabolism. They play key roles in inflammation, cancer and metabolic disease [1]. In this special online only issue of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research effects and functions of various lipids on health are addressed and wide range of research results is presented.

Acrolein
Editors: Jan F. Stevens and Claudia S. Maier
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2011, 55(9).

This special issue of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research is dedicated to acrolein (2-propenal), a constituent of many foods that has poorly understood long-term effects on human health. Acrolein is primarily formed from carbohydrates, lipids and certain amino acids in foods by heat treatment. Besides intake of acrolein via the diet, humans are exposed to acrolein through inhalation of vapors emitted from heated cooking oils, cigarette smoke, and inhalation of combustion products of fossil fuels. Finally, acrolein is formed endogenously as a product of polyamine metabolism and oxidative stressThese and other aspects are covered in this special issue by nine reviews and three research articles.

Resveratrol - Current Outlook and Status
Editor: Veronika Somoza
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2011, 55(8).

Resveratrol gained scientific interest in the early 90s when its presence was reported in red wine, leading to speculations that resveratrol might help explain the “French Paradox”. This is described by significant reduction in cardiovascular disease risk and low mortality from coronary heart disease in France despite relatively high levels of dietary saturated fat and cigarette smoking. This Special Issue of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research provides the latest results on resveratrol's efficacy in human trials, its bioavailability and cellular transport mechanisms, and recent findings that support its beneficial impact on osteoporosis, atherosclerosis, type II diabetes mellitus and cancer prevention. .

Green Tea and Cancer
Editor: Anna H. Wu
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2011, 55(6).

Approximately 20% of the world's tea is consumed as green tea, and there is ample evidence that green tea has cancer preventive properties in in vitro and animal models. However, the question remains whether these chemopreventive properties are observed in humans. Specifically, do green tea drinkers have lower risks of specific cancers? If so, at what levels of intake are needed to observe this lower risk? In addition to presenting an updated review on several selected topics, contributors to this Special Issue of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research on Green Tea and Cancer also describe areas of inconsistencies between human and non-human data and provide insights as to how future research may bridge the knowledge gap.

Bioactive Phenolic Compounds
Editor: Elke Richling
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2011, 55(S1).

In the plant kingdom, the biggest groups of phytochemicals are the phenolic compounds and especially the group of polyphenols. They are recognized as bioactive compounds in plant food such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains and herbal plants. In this special issue of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, effects on human health, functionalities, and occurrence of phenolic compounds are addressed and a wide range of research results is presented.

Reviews 2011
Editors: Peter Schreier, Hans-Ulrich Humpf
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2011, 55(1).

In this issue you will find the 2011 annual collection of ‘Review’ articles covering various aspects of molecular nutrition and food research. It provides 10 comprehensive and critical reviews, one educational paper and one research article written by experts in the field. We hope that you will find this collection of articles interesting and stimulating..

2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

The Vitamin D Revolution
Guest Editor: William B. Grant
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2010, 54(8).

The world is currently in the midst of a ‘Vitamin D Revolution’. Emerging scientific research has linked low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels to increased risk of many types of chronic diseases including many types of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, autoimmune diseases, as well as several types of bacterial and viral infections. The papers on vitamin D in this special issue cover a large range of topics, including the reliability of measuring serum 25(OH)D, vitamin D fortification and supplementation, effects of vitamin D on pregnancy and disease, the vitamin D situation in India, and benefits to the health and wealth of nations.

New Perspectives on Dietary Polyphenols
Editor: Andreas Gescher
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2010, 54(S2).

Polyphenols are arguably the most intensely researched group of nutritional phytochemicals alleged to exert beneficial effects on human health. This special issue of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research provides a wide-ranging perspective of the breadth and depth of current research on this topic. Read more to learn about novel mechanisms which might explain the beneficial health effects of e.g. phenolic acids, extracts of bearberry and green olive leaves, tea polyphenols, polyphenols in wine fractions, xanthohumols, and analogues of resveratrol.

Widened Horizon of Vitamin E Research
Guest Editor: Regina Brigelius-Flohé
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2010, 54(5).

This special issue of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research addresses novel aspects of vitamin E research and summarizes important issues discussed at the satellite symposium on Vitamin E held in Rome on August 26 2009 prior to the annual meeting of the Society for Free Radical Research (SFRR) – Europe. Read more to learn about various topics including the metabolism of vitamin E, vitamin E metabolites, vitamin E transport systems, and the role of vitamin E in signalling, gene regulation, membrane processes and nerve functions.

Lipids in Health and Disease
Editor: Claus Schneider
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2010, 54(S1).

The research articles published in this issue entitled ‘Lipids in Health and Disease’ can loosely be grouped into two themes. The first group of articles provides answers to the question of how dietary non-lipid molecules trigger responses in the physiology and pathophysiology of lipid metabolism. The second interrogates the role of dietary lipids on human physiology, especially addressing issues like metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance as well as inflammatory responses and tissue damage.

Nutritional Neuroscience
Guest Editor: Philipp G. Sand
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2010, 54(4).

Good nutrition is essential for fitness and overall health. But how does diet translate into mental health? Read this special issue to learn more about key mechanisms by which food may act on the brain. From cellular and animal models of brain function, to nutritional epidemiology and the clinical trial level, the entire spectrum of methodologies in nutritional neuroscience is covered. Many of the findings presented lend themselves to further study in the prevention of chronic illnesses including cognitive and mood disorders, and some may hold promise in developing adjuncts to already established forms of treatment.

Novel Approaches for Risk Assessment of Phytochemicals in Food
Guest Editor: Gerhard Eisenbrand
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2010, 54(2).

This special issue focuses on novel approaches for risk assessment of phytochemicals in food. Read the results presented at the international symposium "Risk assessment of phytochemicals in food - novel approaches", which was held from March 30th to April 1st 2009 in Kaiserslautern, Germany. There, the Senate Commission on Food Safety (SKLM) of the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG) discussed the promise of innovative "omic" methodologies including various in-silico, in-vitro and in-vivo approaches, to enhance predictivity and reliability of scientific information on which to base food safety assessment, with international scientists.

Reviews 2010
Editors: Peter Schreier, Hans-Ulrich Humpf
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2010, 54(1).

In this issue you will find the 2010 annual collection of Reviews articles covering various aspects of molecular nutrition and food research. It provides 10 comprehensive and critical reviews and one report written by experts in the field. We hope that you will find this collection of articles interesting and stimulating.

2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

The Maillard Reaction in Food and Medicine-Current Status and Future Aspects
COST Action 927
Guest Editor: Veronika Somoza
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2009, 53(12).

This special issue focuses on the question whether the dietary intake of Maillard reaction products poses a health risk to humans. Read the latest results from COST Action 927, in which scientists from all over Europe, the USA and Australia, continue to contribute to the knowledge on the formation of Maillard reaction products in foods, as well as in living organisms, and their biological implications.

Apple Juice and Intestinal Health
Guest Editor: Dieter Schrenk
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2009, 53(10).

Read this special issue to find out which role various kinds of apple juice play in the colon. Studies show a number of effects in cell culture, most notably anti-oxidative, anti-proliferative effects, and shifts in gene expression patterns which are likely to be beneficial in vivo. Thus, apple juices have the potency to partially prevent colo-rectal cancer in experimental models.

Selected Bioactive Plant Compounds in Human Nutrition
Guest Editor: Ulrich Schlemmer
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2009, 53(S2).

Find out how processing and storage affect the bioavailability of bioactive plant food compounds by reading our Special Issue on selected bioactive plant compounds in human nutrition.

Food Processing and Allergenicity
Guest Editor: Gregory S. Ladics
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2009, 53(8).

This special issue focuses on the effect of various food processing methods on potential human allergenicity. Find out how different allergenic foods respond to physical, chemical, or biochemical processing methods. In some cases allergenicity is unaltered, in others it is decreased when epitopes are destroyed, and in certain cases food processing increases allergenicity when new epitopes appear or when existing epitopes are unmasked.

Dietary phenolics, absorption, mammalian and microbial metabolism and colonic health
Guest Editor: Alan Crozier
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2009, 53(S1).

There is increasing interest in how dietary flavonoids and related compounds that make their way to the large intestine are broken down to simple phenolic acids by the colonic microflora and what potential impact they may have on the microflora itself and on colonic health. Find out more by reading this issue on dietary phenolics, absorption, mammalian and microbial metabolism and colonic health.

Arsenic
Guest Editor: Partha Basu
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2009, 53(5).

This special issue covers various properties of arsenic: how arsenic enters into the food chain, how it may exert its toxicity, and to what extent protein expression is influenced by arsenic exposure. In addition to these negative health effects, the issue reports about arsenics use as a medicine, also covering its anticancer activity.

Food-borne Mycotoxins
Guest Editor: Doris Marko
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2009, 53(4).

Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by various fungi which are frequently found in a wide variety of food items, thus causing a potential health risk. This Special Issue focuses on how mycotoxins act on a molecular level, including a range of toxic effects, and also discusses in which regard these toxic effects may be useful for the development of new chemical compounds in cancer therapy.

Diet and Prostate Cancer
Guest Editors: Andy H. Lee, Colin W. Binns
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2009, 53(2).

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed in men and has increased dramatically in the past two decades partly as a result of lifestyle changes. Indeed, prostate cancer is a disease of the affluent West while Japan has one of the lowest rates of prostate cancer amongst economically developed nations. The traditional Japanese diet may reduce the risk of prostate cancer through a combination of increased soybean products and fish intake, with reduced red meat consumption. Also, the Mediterranean diet, as well as tomatoes and other red and orange coloured vegetables and fruits, may be protective against prostate cancer. While reading the special issue on Diet and Prostate Cancer we suggest you relax with a good cup of tea as tea may well play an important role in prostate cancer prevention.

Reviews on Mitocans
Natural and Synthetic Compounds with Anti-Cancer Activity
Guest Editors: Stephen J. Ralph, Jiri Neuzil
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2009, 53(1).

This year's reviews issue is devoted to the topic of mitocans, the family of mitochondrially targeted anti-cancer agents. It is devoted to a new way to fight cancers based on drugs, many of which originate as nutritional or natural compounds, and which share in common their ability to disrupt energy flows inside cancer cells, particularly by acting on the mitochondria the powerhouses inside cells.

2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

EuroPrevall Food Allergen Library
Editors: Karin Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Stefan Vieths
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2008, 52(S2).

Diagnosis of food allergy depends on the quality of allergen preparations. Unfortunately, in many cases the quality of food allergen material used is poorly defined or not fully comparable so that misleading or divergent results are possible. This issue is dedicated to state of the art purification and characterization methods of food allergens. A food allergen library was established, comprising known and newly identified allergens from various foods, in order to collect purified allergen material with defined and comparable quality.

Selenium
Guest Editor: Alan M. Diamond
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2008, 52(11).

Recent events have seen the focus shift from toxicity to the benefits of adequate or supplemented levels of selenium in the diet because it is likely to influence cancer incidence and also affects hormone metabolism and immunity. This Special Issue is intended to serve as a useful primer for both those interested in using nutrition to minimize disease and those directly involved in the study of selenium biology.

Curcumin: A Promising Spice for Therapeutics
Guest Editor: Catalina Alarcón de la Lastra
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2008, 52(9).

Curcumin, the gold-coloured spice of turmeric, holds a variety of therapeutic properties such as wound healing activities, antiviral, antifungical and anti-inflammatory effects. It also has immunomodulatory potential and is a promising new anti-cancer agent because of its antiangiogenic properties. Taking into account the low cost of curcumin and its pharmacological safety for most diseases, there is no doubt that curcumin is a promising "spice" for therapeutics.

Nutrition and Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Guest Editor: Jean-Marie Reimund
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2008, 52(8).

In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), numerous pathogenic factors alter nutritional status, and, despite they occur usually very early in the disease process, they still remain often misdiagnosed. Some of these nutritional abnormalities may also persist during remission, presumably interfering with disease course and/or response to treatment. Therefore, it is important to increase our knowledge on the interactions between nutrition and IBD, not only in terms of pathogenesis, but also to provide to patients better care.

Herb-Drug Interactions: Theory versus Practice / 25 Years Food Chemistry and Toxicology at the University of Kaiserslautern
Herb-Drug Interactions: Theory versus Practice; Guest Editor: Jerry M. Cott
and
25 Years Food Chemistry and Toxicology at the University of Kaiserslautern; Editor: Gerhard Eisenbrand
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2008, 52(7).

Foods and botanical agents could enhance or reduce the effects of prescribed medications. This special issue provides some fresh perspectives, and inspire a new level of thoughtful and responsible discourse for these rapidly evolving fields of therapeutics and of personal health maintenance.

Natural Products and Dietary Prevention of Cancer
Guest Editors: Agnes M. Rimando, Nanjoo Suh
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2008, 52(S1).

Phytochemicals from food as well as medicinal plants are recognized as agents that play a role in cancer prevention. This Supplementary Issue focuses on selected natural products and their putative role in reducing the risk or delaying the development of cancer.

Physiological Effects of Thermally Treated Foods
COST Action 927
Editor: Veronika Somoza
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2008, 52(3).

Update on COST Action 927, see also Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2005, 49(7), Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2006, 50(9) and Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2007, 51(4).

Contaminants in Food - Brominated Flame Retardants
Guest Editor: Jacob de Boer
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2008, 52(2).

Although consumption of fatty fish is recommended because of the healthy omega-3 fatty acids, there is little information on the protective effects in relation to the risk posed by contaminants such as brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Issue 2/08 gives an overview of the occurrence and possible health effects of BFRs in food.

Reviews 2008
Editors: Peter Schreier, Hans-Ulrich Humpf
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2008, 52(1).

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

Garlic
Guest Editor: Edzard Ernst
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2007, 51(11).

This Special Issue provides an overview of recent results in garlic research ranging from basic research to clinical investigation, from efficacy data to evidence on safety, from well-known indications, such as cardiovascular diseases, to lesser known ones, such as fatigue.

Virgin Olive Oil: Its Functional Capacity
Guest Editor: Francisco Pérez Jiménez
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2007, 51(10).

The Mediterranean diet represents a healthy nutritional model related to longevity and a lower frequency of chronic diseases, in particular coronary heart disease. This Special Issue focuses on the healthy effects as a result of consuming virgin olive oil within the context of a Mediterranean diet and a healthy life style.

Are Dietary AGEs/ALEs a Health Risk?
Guest Editor: Monika Pischetsrieder
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2007, 51(9).

Find out more about how the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and advanced lipid oxidation products (ALEs) is correlated not only with ageing, but also with the development of several diseases, such as diabetes or uremia.

Hormonally Active Compounds in Food
Guest Editor: Manfred Metzler
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2007, 51(7).

A particulary complex class of foods constituents are compounds which are able to mimic the effects of sex hormones. Find out how these may exert beneficial or adverse effects on various organs.

Berry Fruits
Guest Editor: Garry G. Duthie
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2007, 51(6).

Do berry fruits help to prevent cancer and heart disease? In vitro studies indicate that several anthocyanins found in berries have a range of potentially anti-cancer and anti-heart disease properties.

Thermally Processed Foods: Possible Health Implications
COST Action 927
Editor: Veronika Somoza
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2007, 51(4).

Update on COST Action 927, see also Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2005, 49(7) and Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2006, 50(9).

Reviews 2007
Editors: Peter Schreier, Hans-Ulrich Humpf
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2007, 51(1).

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

Maillard Reaction and Health Aspects
Guest Editor: Chi-Tang Ho
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2006, 50(12).

Palatable, high-quality processed foods? Read Issue 12/06 for a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of thermally generated aromas in food.

Dioxins
Guest Editor: Dieter Schrenk
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2006, 50(10).

Read this Special Issue for detailed information on problems caused by dioxins, including sources, exposure, levels in breast milk, analysis, risk assessment, carcinogenesis and its molecular mechanisms.

Thermally Processed Foods: Possible Health Implications
COST Action 927
Editor: Veronika Somoza
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2006, 50(9).

Update on COST Action 927, see also Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2005, 49(7).

Bioinformatics of Protein Allergenicity
HESI Workshop, Mallorca, Spain, February 22-24, 2005
Guest Editor: James Gibson
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2006, 50(7).

The ILSI Health and Environmental Science Institute hosted a workshop to evaluate the current bioinfomatic methodologies used to identify similarities to known allergens.

Mycotoxins - Food Safety Aspects
Euro-Maghrebin Symposium, Fez, September 7-9, 2005
Guest Editor: Annie Pfohl Leszkowicz
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2006, 50(6).

Food-borne diseases are among the most wide-spread health problems in the developing world. This Special Issue focuses on those originating from mycotoxins.

Food Chemistry - Link to Biology and Medicine
International Symposium, University of Würzburg, Germany, October 12, 2005
Editor: Peter Schreier
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2006, 50(4-5).

The development of Food Chemistry as a link to Chemistry, Biology and Medicine is nicely reflected in various contributions of the participants of the International Symposium held in Würzburg in October 2005.

Tea and Health
Guest Editor: Fung-Lung Chung
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2006, 50(2).

Tea is widely accepted to be a healthy drink. Read Issue 2/06 to find out how tea and its active components actually exert the biological functions associated with its consumption.

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

Atherosclerosis and Lipid Peroxidation
Guest Editors: László Nagy, Gerhard Spiteller
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2005, 49(11).

This Special Issue focuses on the possible connection between atherosclerosis, oxidation of LDL and an oversupply of fatty food.

Xanthohumol
Guest Editors: Clarissa Gerhäuser, Norbert Frank
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2005, 49(9).

Does Xanthohumol - a prenylated chalcone derived from the hop - have any potential health-promoting effects? For details read Issue 9/05.

Thermally Processed Foods: Possible Health Implications
COST Action 927
Editor: Veronika Somoza
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2005, 49(7).

Both harmful and beneficial compounds are formed during the heat treatment of various foods. COST action 927 focuses on gaining basic knowledge about the formation of these compounds and their biological effects.

Dietary Fibres
Guest Editors: Lynette R. Ferguson, Philip J. Harris
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2005, 49(6).

This Special Issue provides a snapshot view of some crucial thinking on Dietary Fibres, their potential use in industry, and their role in protecting against human disease.

Resveratrol
Guest Editor: Veronika Somoza
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2005, 49(5).

Find out more about the possible health benefits of resveratrol found in red wine, such as cardio-, vascular- and neuroprotective effects or anticarcinogenic and chemopreventive activity.

Reviews 2005
Editors: Peter Schreier, Hans-Ulrich Humpf
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2005, 49(2).

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

Foodborne Infections and Intoxications
Guest Editor: Helge Karch
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2004, 48(7).

This Special Issue illustrates the heterogeneity and broadness of the spectrum of foodborne infections and intoxications, and shows techniques for their detection.

Food Allergy II
Editor: Stefan Vieths
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2004, 48(6).

Food Allergy I
Editor: Stefan Vieths
Mol. Nutr. Food Res., 2004, 48(5).

The Special Issues on Food Allergy provide a multidisciplinary approach to understanding the complex mechanisms relevant for the development of allergic reactions to foods.

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