PROTEOMICS

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 13-14

Edited By: Michael J. Dunn

Impact Factor: 3.973

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 14/78 (BIOCHEMICAL RESEARCH METHODS); 87/291 (Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)

Online ISSN: 1615-9861

Associated Title(s): PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications

Introducing our new Editorial Board Members

Ganesh Kumar Agrawal

Ganesh Kumar Agrawal

Ganesh Kumar Agrawal has been working on different aspects of plant proteomics since the year 2000 when proteomics, a high-throughput genome-enabled technology, was beginning to be utilized in plants to comprehend our understanding on plant biology at the system level. He is a multidisciplinary scientist working on the global problem of food security, safety, and human nutrition using proteomics and its integration with other high-throughput and targeted omics techniques. He has authored/co-authored more than 180 research publications (original articles, reviews and book chapters) and edited comprehensive books entitled “Plant Proteomics: Technologies, Strategies, and Applications” (John Wiley & Sons, NY, USA, 2008) and “Seed Development: OMICS Technologies Toward Improvement of Seed Quality and Crop Yield” (Springer Publisher, USA). He holds prestigious awards (i.e., Monbusho & JSPS), serves as reviewer of international scientific journals (>26) and grant proposals, and is a member of Editorial Board of International Proteomics-related Journals. He received his MSc in Physical Chemistry in 1989 from NEPAL (Tribhuvan University, Chemistry Department, Kathmandu) and was awarded PhD in Applied Biological Chemistry (Biochemistry & Biotechnology) in 1998 from Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, JAPAN. He did extensive post-doctoral research work in Japan (Genomics, Proteomics, and Metabolomics-related biological questions) and the USA (Proteomics), before returning to Nepal for promotion of education and research for the younger generation. He continues to work closely with collaborators in different countries (i.e., India, Korea, Italy, and Japan) on various projects related to use of omics technologies in plants.

Kent Arrell

Kent Arrell

Kent Arrell received his BA and BSc Honours (Genetics) from the University of Manitoba, Canada, and his MSc (Microbiology) and PhD (Physiology) from Queen’s University, Canada. During his PhD, Kent studied proteomics of cardiac pharmacological preconditioning under the supervision of Dr. Jennifer Van Eyk, during which time he also beta-tested the prototype of Bio-Rad’s Protean IEF system. From 2003 to 2008, Kent was a postdoctoral fellow under the supervision of Dr. Andre Terzic at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, developing and applying network systems approaches for proteomic research into cardiac development, stress adaptation, and regenerative medicine. Dr. Arrell is currently a member of the Mayo Clinic Division of Cardiovascular Diseases and a faculty member with the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine. His research focuses on further development and application of proteomic approaches to assess prediction, diagnosis, and therapy of biological complexity in cardiac health and disease, through implementation of network analysis and network architecture for systems modeling and actionable prognostication of large scale -omic data. Dr. Arrell’s 24 peer reviewed publications, mostly in high impact journals, have been cited more than 1500 times. He holds 2 US patents, has published two book chapters, serves as a Reviewer for 14 journals encompassing proteomics, cardiology, stem cell biology, pharmacology, and biochemistry, and has reviewed for the NIH RC4, R01, and R21 programs and the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research Veni, Vidi, Vici program.

Oliver Drews

Oliver Drews

Oliver Drews contributed to advancements in the separation and analysis of denatured and non-denatured proteins as well as protein complexes by methodical developments in proteomics and protein biochemistry. His research group in the Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology at the Heidelberg University in Germany investigates the regulatory network by which targeted protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system impacts cardiovascular disease. He started his training in proteomics with Dr. Angelika Görg at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) in 2000 after graduating at the Ruhr-University Bochum (RUB) in Biology. Since then, he is committed to spreading the knowledge in proteomics, which included teaching classes for the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and contributing to educational sessions for the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO). After receiving a PhD in 2005, he joined the Cardiac Proteomics and Signaling Laboratory of Dr. Peipei Ping in the Departments of Physiology and Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) to combine his interests in proteomics and physiology. His research was recognized and funded by organizations, such as the American Heart Association (AHA), the European Commission (FP7-PEOPLE), and the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK).

Melanie Föcking

Melanie Föcking

Melanie Föcking has been Research Lecturer in the Department of Psychiatry at the RCSI since 2005. She received her undergraduate degree from the Faculty of Nutritional Sciences, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany before she moved on to brain research. She participated in the European Graduate School of Neuroscience and did her PhD studies in the Department of Experimental Neuroscience, at the Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research, Cologne, Germany as well as an EU Marie Curie Fellow at the School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands. She continued to work as a postdoctoral researcher in the Max Planck Institute in Cologne prior to moving to Ireland in 2004. Current research and areas of interest include the neuroproteomics of schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder; computational analysis of pathways found by high throughput proteomics methods; Investigations of Pharmacological treatments in psychotic disease; Clathrin mediated endocytosis and NMDA receptor hypofunction; Pre- and postsynaptic differences in disease; Schizophrenia and accelerated ageing; Prenatal stress and depression. Her work has been recognized by a 2012 NARSAD Young Investigator Grant.

Cecilia Gelfi

Cecilia Gelfi

Faculty of Pharmacy, degree in Pharmaceutical Science and Technologies
Professor of Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Faculty of Medicine, University of Milano
Associate scientists to CNR. Institute of bioimaging and molecular physiology
Coordinator of the Italian Human proteome Network
Research activity: Proteome signature under physiological paraphysiological and pathological conditions of muscle tissue and biological fluids for the development of new diagnostic tools.

Research interests:
The scientific activity of the coordinator, Cecilia Gelfi, has been focused on two aspects:
- the development of methodologies for the separation and identification of biomolecules. She participated in the development of electrophoretic techniques transforming them into a tool for probing macromolecules.
- the investigation of the functional and morphological changes occurring in muscle in a number of physiological and pathological states. Since 1999 she has contributed to define the muscle proteome signature under physiological, paraphysiological and pathological conditions generating a database of differential changes in muscle proteomes both in humans and in animal models. These studies allowed to: i) define the inter individual variability of proteins expressed in specific muscles, ii) identify proteomics profiles of different human muscles (e.g. vastus lateralis, deltoideus, soleus, tibialis) associating them to muscle phenotypes. More recently, her interest has focused on the study of muscle changes in neuromuscular disorders. The data generated from previous differential muscle proteomic analyses are fundamental for this project.

Editorial activity:
She published 220 scientific articles on international peer-reviewed journals (h-index 2012: 35).

Rebekah Gundry

Rebekah Gundry

Rebekah Gundry is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Her current research focuses on exploiting pluripotent stem cell technology to model early stages of human cardiac development. Specifically, Dr. Gundry focuses on defining cell surface markers that enable the non-transgene based identification and isolation of stage and subtype specific pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and defining the functional roles of the surface proteins in early heart development. She received her Honor's BSc in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Marquette University in 1999 followed by a MSc in Forensic Science from The George Washington University in 2001, where she conducted her thesis research at the FBI Forensic Science Research Unit in Quantico, VA. In 2006, she received her PhD from the Middle Atlantic Mass Spectrometry Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Her postdoctoral studies included time at Johns Hopkins NHLBI Proteomics Center, ETH, Zurich and the NIH. Dr. Gundry joined the faculty at the Medical College of Wisconsin in 2010. Major awards include an NIH Pathway to Independence Award, BD Biosciences Research Grant Award, and the 2013 Robert J. Cotter Young Investigator award from the US Human Proteome Organization.

Christof Rampitsch

Christof Rampitsch

Christof Rampitsch is a Research Scientist with Agriculture and Agrifood Canada in Winnipeg, situated on the edge of the Canadian prairie wheat growing region. His research is focused on proteomics of Fusarium graminearum, which causes Fusarium head blight on wheat and which represents a major challenge not only in agricultural production, but also in food safety because of mycotoxin contamination. His main research objective is to elucidate biochemical control mechanisms which regulate mycotoxin production, principally through the post-translational modification of regulatory proteins. Both phosphorylation and the regulated oxidation of cysteine are two of the principal post-translational modifications thought to contribute to mycotoxin regulation. He also studies other plant-pathogen interactions at the proteome level, including Puccinia triticina (leaf rust) and Verticillum dahliae (wilt disease). He is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Manitoba and he is a Canadian Representative and North America Co-ordinator of the International Plant Proteomics Organization. He received his BSc (Hons) and MSc degrees from the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, and his PhD from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Juan Antonio Vizcaino

Juan Antonio Vizcaíno

Juan Antonio Vizcaíno is the Project Leader of the PRIDE database at the EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (Hinxton, Cambridge, UK). PRIDE is one of the world's foremost public repositories for mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics data. He is also currently managing the ‘ProteomeXchange’ consortium of proteomics resources. He earned undergraduate degrees in Pharmacy (1997) and Biochemistry (2000), a Master's degree in Microbiology (1998), and a PhD in Molecular Biology (2005) at the University of Salamanca (Spain). As a postdoc he moved to bioinformatics. After working for one year in a functional genomics project in the University of Seville, he joined the PRIDE team in 2006. Since then, he has been mainly working in the computational proteomics field. For instance, he has been involved in the development of PRIDE and its related tools (PRIDE Converter and PRIDE Inspector among others), and several data standards (e.g. mzIdentML, mzTab) and the corresponding software, as part of his contribution to the HUPO-Proteomics Standards Initiative. In addition, he has participated in a number of research projects, and is quite experienced in providing training and support. Recently, he has also been involved in the development of bioinformatics tools in the MS lipidomics field. So far, he has co-authored over 60 scientific papers in International journals, including among others Proteomics, Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, Nature Methods and Nature Biotechnology.

Uwe Völker

Uwe Völker

Uwe Völker received his Diploma (Biology) and PhD (Microbiology) from the University of Greifswald, Germany, under the supervision of Dr. Michael Hecker. Afterwards he spent some time as PostDoc in Germany and then moved to the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio as a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. William G. Haldenwang from 1993-1996. Returning to Germany, he joined the Department of Dr. Rudolf Thauer at the Max-Planck-Institute for terrestrial Microbiology and the Laboratory for Microbiology at the Philipps-University Marburg, Germany, as an Assistant Professor from 1996-2002. Up until then his work was primarily focused on the exploration of bacterial adaptation reactions using proteomics technologies. In 2002 he joined the Medical School at University Greifswald as an Associate Professor for Functional Genomics. Since 2008 he is Full Professor for Functional Genomics at University Medicine Greifswald and Head of the Department of Functional Genomics. Within the Department of Functional Genomics, genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics technologies are being applied for the analysis of cellular adaptation reactions and clinical outcomes. Current research topics include: analysis of stress adaptation reactions and regulatory networks of low-GC Gram-positive bacteria and integration of the complex data in systems biology approaches, characterization of host-pathogen interactions using the Gram-positive pathogen S. aureus as model, analysis of the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases using a combination of OMICs and cell biology approaches, determination of the association of genetic factors with clinical and subclinical phenotypes. So far he has co-authored more than 190 peer reviewed publications.

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