Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 15 Issue 6

Editor-in-Chief: Kirsten Severing, Editor: Anne Pfisterer

Online ISSN: 1616-5195

Associated Title(s): Advanced Healthcare Materials, Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics, Macromolecular Materials and Engineering, Macromolecular Rapid Communications

News

RSS feeds: news | news + recent journal content.

July 02, 2015

TREND: Click Functionalization of Aromatic Polymers for Organic Electronic Device Applications

TREND: Click Functionalization of Aromatic Polymers for Organic Electronic Device Applications

Tsuyoshi Michinobu

Optical and electrochemical properties of aromatic polymers are tuned by the novel click reactions using cyano-acceptor reagents. The resulting polymers contain donor–acceptor chromophores and accordingly can be applied to organic electronic devices including thin film transistors, organic solar cells, and polymer memory devices. A series of device studies reveal the characteristic electronic features of the formed donor-acceptor chromophores.

Macromol. Chem. Phys., DOI: 10.1002/macp.201500086

More information on the invited Talent, Trend, and Highlight articles in Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics can be found here.

June 18, 2015

TREND: Interfacial RAFT Miniemulsion Polymerization: Architectures from an Interface

TREND: Interfacial RAFT Miniemulsion Polymerization: Architectures from an Interface

Adrian V. Fuchs,* Kristofer J. Thurecht

The design of polymer architectures using macro reversible addition–fragmentation chain-transfer agents in a miniemulsion polymerization requires an understanding of the processes occurring at the droplet interface. The development of interfacially confined reversible addition–fragmentation chain-transfer in miniemulsion can selectively produce nanoparticles or nanocapsules. This article summarizes the developments that have led to the production of novel, functional polymer platforms using this technique.

Macromol. Chem. Phys., DOI: 10.1002/macp.201500061

More information on the invited Talent, Trend, and Highlight articles in Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics can be found here.

April 17, 2015

TALENT: Regioselective Metal-Free Click Polymerization of Azides and Alkynes

TALENT: Regioselective Metal-Free Click Polymerization of Azides and Alkynes

Anjun Qin,* Yong Liu, Ben Zhong Tang*

Metal-free click polymerization (MFCP) has been developed to circumvent the problems inherent in the broadly-applied Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne click polymerization reactions. The regioselective MFCP of azides and alkynes to produce regioregular polytriazoles is summarized, and the properties and applications of the resultant polymers are also discussed.

Macromol. Chem. Phys., DOI: 10.1002/macp.201400571

More information on the invited Talent, Trend, and Highlight articles in Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics can be found here.

January 21, 2015

TREND: Polymers and Ionic Liquids: A Successful Wedding

TREND: Polymers and Ionic Liquids: A Successful Wedding

Sébastien Livi,* Jannick Duchet-Rumeau, Jean-François Gérard, Thi Nhan Pham

Different pathways for development of nanostructured and advanced materials are summarized, based on the use of ionic liquids (ILs) as multifunctional agents of polymer matrices. The true potential of ILs in the design of new polymeric materials with unprecedented mechanical per­formance, thermal stability, and barrier properties is highlighted.

Macromol. Chem. Phys., DOI: 10.1002/macp.201400425

More information on the invited Talent, Trend, and Highlight articles in Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics can be found here.

July 30, 2013

Stem Cells: Advanced Polymers for Stem Cell Research - From Laboratory to Clinic

Stem Cells: Advanced Polymers for Stem Cell Research - From Laboratory to Clinic

Suwan N. Jayasinghe

Guest-editor Suwan N. Jayasinghe introduces the third and last part of the series: Advanced Polymers for Stem Cell Biology and Medicine. In this final part it is further demonstrated how the exploration of biopolymers can lead to a wide range of applications from stem cell culturing to their exploration as vehicles for cells and/or genes. Again, this series demonstrates how progress in this highly interesting field can only be reached by the bridging of several disciplines of research and development.

Macromol. Biosci., DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300064

July 29, 2013

Stem Cells: In Vitro Neo-Cartilage Formation

Stem Cells: In Vitro Neo-Cartilage Formation

Sumrita Bhat, Lars Lidgren and Ashok Kumar*

Limited blood supply and the avascular nature of articular cartilage restrict its self-repair capacity, frequently leading to osteoarthritis. Researchers from India and Sweden focus on scaffolds for tissue repair from natural polymers, for example gelatin, chitosan, and agarose in the form of composites. A novel way of fabrication, known as cryogelation, is presented, in which matrices are synthesized at sub-zero temperature. Cell seeded scaffolds incubated under appropriate conditions result in the accumulation of matrix components on the surface of the gel in the form of neo-cartilage. Neo-cartilage exhibits similarity to native cartilage with respect to its physical, mechanical and biochemical properties. Based on these similarities it can provide a new approach for the treatment of localized joint injuries.

Macromol. Biosci., DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200484

July 28, 2013

Stem Cells: The Fate of Tissue Development

Stem Cells: The Fate of Tissue Development

Anuj Tripathi, Tanushree Vishnoi, Deepti Singh, and Ashok Kumar*

Cell to matrix interactions affect in vitro cell adherence and proliferation and further decide the fate of tissue development for biomedical applications. This study demonstrates the role of crosslinking in altering the surface properties of 3D porous cryogel matrices. Glutaraldehyde and 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide crosslinkers are used separately for the crosslinking of alginate and gelatin, respectively. The difference in crosslinking affects the physiochemical properties of these matrices leading to variable cell behavior as demonstrated using four different cell types. The present study demonstrates the successful use of controlled crosslinking in directing the cell growth for tissue engineering.

Macromol. Biosci., DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200398

July 27, 2013

Stem Cells: Phenotype-Independent Effects of Retroviral Transduction in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

Stem Cells: Phenotype-Independent Effects of Retroviral Transduction in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

Obi Egbuniwe,* Andrew D. Grant, Tara Renton, and Lucy Di Silvio*

There has been considerable progress in the development of biopolymers that could impact directly on in vivo stem cell fate. Present-day biopolymers are being designed to mirror the well-described relationship existing between stem cells and the extracellular matrix. Researchers from London highlight the importance of the maintenance of cell viability and the development of human tissue-sourced stem cell lines. A better understanding of in vitro responses of these specialized cells to changes in their tightly regulated microenvironments will allow the utilization of their full therapeutic potential in biomimetic constructs

Macromol. Biosci., DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300020

August 15, 2012

Stem Cells: Maintaining Stem Cells with Hydrogels

Stem Cells: Maintaining Stem Cells with Hydrogels

Yongxing Liu, Lyndon F. Charles, Thomas I. Zarembinski, Kalle I. Johnson, Sarah K. Atzet, Robin L. Wesselschmidt, Mark E. Wight, Liisa T. Kuhn*

Traditionally the maintenance and the propagation of stem cells require feeder cells like mitotically inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblasts or human fibroblasts. The use of these cells comes with some drawbacks like problems in large-scale culture, limited genetic manipulations of the human pluripotent stem cells, and xeno-contamination, particularly when mouse feeder cells are used. Widely used feeder-free systems like MatrigelTM are problematic as they might still carry xenogeneic pathogens and vary from lot to lot. Liisa Kuhn (University of Connecticut Health Center) and coworkers now showed that a fully defined gelatin-modified hyaluronan hydrogel (HyStem-CTM) is able to maintain mouse embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) in culture while retaining their growth and pluripotent characteristics. Modified HA hydrogels like the one shown here provide a safer direction towards completely animal-free conditions for clinical application, handling, and understanding of hPSCs.

Macromol. Biosci., DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200043

August 15, 2012

Stem Cells: Hydrogel/Mineral Composites for Bone Tissue Repair

Stem Cells: Hydrogel/Mineral Composites for Bone Tissue Repair

Ameya Phadke, Yu-Ru V. Shih, Shyni Varghese*

Bone consists of an inorganic apatite-like mineral phase as well as an organic protein phase composed primarily of type-I collagen, proteoglycans, and noncollagenous proteins. To mimic this structure, researchers in the USA and Taiwan have synthesized a hydrogel/mineral composite through templated mineralization of polyanionic hydrogels. These materials were found to promote osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells even in the absence of osteogenesis-inducing medium supplements. The potential of these materials to provide an instructive environment for osteogenic differentiation of stem cells is shown here. This study thus demonstrates the development of an osteoinductive synthetic material containing bone-like calcium phosphate mineral as a promising candidate for bone tissue repair.

Macromol. Biosci., DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100289

August 15, 2012

Stem Cells: Artificial Organs

Stem Cells: Artificial Organs

Achala de Mel, Alexander M. Seifalian,* Martin A. Birchall

This review by Alexander M. Seifalian (University College London) gives a deep and comprehensive understanding of the design, methods, and complexity of materials used to mimic and replace organs. Reconstruction and replacement of organs with tissue engineered materials is becoming reality as first-in-man experiences have been successful. One of the challenges in this field is to integrate cells into predesigned 3D materials. Greater integration of cells with biomaterial scaffolds requires biochemical modifications and topographical changes, which could create an artificial niche for cells to reside within the 3D scaffolds. Therefore, precise knowledge of cell/material interactions is indispensable. The review covers several aspects of tissue engineering like complexity of tissue-engineered implants, scaffold design for structural support, cell/material interactions and live monitoring of cell/material interactions.

Macromol. Biosci., DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200039

August 07, 2012

Stem Cells: Hydrogels from Natural Polysaccharides as 3D Cell Delivery System

Stem Cells: Hydrogels from Natural Polysaccharides as 3D Cell Delivery System

Mélanie Lavergne, Mohammed Derkaoui, Catherine Delmau, Didier Letourneur, Georges Uzan and Catherine Le Visage

Human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are considered as promising cell therapy tools for vascular diseases. They usually suffer from a very low survival rate when directly injected into the diseased tissue. Therefore it can be advantageous to use porous scaffold biomaterials as a cell delivery system. Researchers in France have now synthesized polysaccharide-based scaffolds and successfully cultured ECFCs in these materials. It could be demonstrated that the dextran/pullulan hydrogels maintain the ECFC's vascular properties for up to 7 days in vitro and do not affect cell proliferation, viability, or motility. These results demonstrate the high potential of these materials as scaffolds for endothelial progenitor delivery for the treatment of vascular diseases.

Macromol. Biosci., DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100431

July 02, 2015
TREND: Click Functionalization of Aromatic Polymers for Organic Electronic Device Applications

June 18, 2015
TREND: Interfacial RAFT Miniemulsion Polymerization: Architectures from an Interface

April 17, 2015
TALENT: Regioselective Metal-Free Click Polymerization of Azides and Alkynes

January 21, 2015
TREND: Polymers and Ionic Liquids: A Successful Wedding

July 30, 2013
Stem Cells: Advanced Polymers for Stem Cell Research - From Laboratory to Clinic

July 29, 2013
Stem Cells: In Vitro Neo-Cartilage Formation

July 28, 2013
Stem Cells: The Fate of Tissue Development

July 27, 2013
Stem Cells: Phenotype-Independent Effects of Retroviral Transduction in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

August 15, 2012
Stem Cells: Maintaining Stem Cells with Hydrogels

August 15, 2012
Stem Cells: Hydrogel/Mineral Composites for Bone Tissue Repair

August 15, 2012
Stem Cells: Artificial Organs

August 07, 2012
Stem Cells: Hydrogels from Natural Polysaccharides as 3D Cell Delivery System

August 07, 2012
Stem Cells: Electrospun PLA Fibers for Controlled TCP Release

August 02, 2012
Stem Cells: Fiber Thickness to Direct Stem Cell Differentiation

August 02, 2012
Stem Cells: PLLA/MWCNT Composites as Conductive Biomaterials

June 01, 2012
Stem Cells: Understanding Embryo Formation

May 31, 2012
Stem Cells: Multifunctionalized Nanoparticle Systems for Treatment of Central Nervous System Diseases

March 23, 2012
Stem Cells: Gelatin-Based Hydrogels as Potential Implantable Carriers for Stem Cells

March 22, 2012
Stem Cells: Polymeric Systems for Tissue Engineering and Biomedical Applications

January 31, 2012
Stem Cells: Polymer-based Scaffold Designs For In Situ Vascular Tissue Engineering: Controlling Recruitment and Differentiation Behavior of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells

December 20, 2011
Stem Cells: Mechanical Properties and Topographical Features in Concert - Influence on Cell Migration

December 19, 2011
Stem Cells: A Dextran-Based Polymer as Cell-Detaching Substrate

October 24, 2011
Stem Cells: Tissue-Specific Stem Cell Differentiation in an in vitro Airway Model

October 23, 2011
Stem Cells: Pullulan Hydrogels for Skin Regeneration

October 22, 2011
Stem Cells: Advanced Polymers for Stem Cell Research - The Series Continues

June 21, 2011
Stem Cells: A Library of Polyureas for Ligament Tissue Engineering

April 05, 2011
Stem Cells: A Tool for Studying Stem Cells during Wound-Healing Processes

April 05, 2011
Stem Cells: Polymeric Scaffold for Adipose Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering

March 16, 2011
Stem Cells: ECM Functionalized Microcavities to Control Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Fate

March 16, 2011
Stem Cells: Injectable Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

February 17, 2011
Stem Cells: Moving Gradient Generation to the Third Dimension

February 15, 2011
Stem Cells: Low Thrombogenicity Coatings for Vascular Grafts

January 14, 2011
Stem Cells: Biodegradable Elastomers for Tissue Engineering and Cell–Biomaterial Interactions

December 16, 2010
Stem Cells: Agarose-Alginate Cryogel for Bioengineering Applications

December 16, 2010
Stem Cells: How to Sterilize PET Fibers for Vascular Grafts

November 09, 2010
Stem Cells: Advanced Polymers for Stem Cell Biology and Medicine

Archive

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION