BioFactors

Cover image for Vol. 41 Issue 1

Edited By: Angelo Azzi

Impact Factor: 3.0

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 57/124 (Endocrinology & Metabolism); 130/291 (Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)

Online ISSN: 1872-8081

Associated Title(s): Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, Biotechnology and Applied Biochemistry, IUBMB Life

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  • Dietary cocoa protects against colitis-associated cancer by activating the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway

    Dietary cocoa protects against colitis‐associated cancer by activating the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway

    Cocoa reduced DAI and colonic cell proliferation. (A) Experimental protocol for colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis model. (B) Induction of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight), followed by three cycles of 2% DSS resulted in triphasic colitis with peak of DAI values at the end of each DSS treatment interval and a slower recovery during DSS free intervals. The method of calculation of DAI was described in Materials and Methods section. Treatment with 5 and 10% cocoa showed 2–3 folds decrease in DAI compared to AOM/DSS-induced mice. (C) Immunohistochemical expression of Ki-67, Increased cell proliferation was noted in AOM/DSS-induced mice. 5 and 10% cocoa showed respective decrease in cell proliferation. (D) Scoring of Ki-67 positive cells. Totally 50 crypts were randomly chosen to count number of positive Ki-67 cells/3 mice from each group. Values are expressed as mean ± SD. Comparisons: acontrol versus AOM + DSS, bAOM + DSS versus AOM/DSS + 5% cocoa, cAOM + DSS versus AOM/DSS + 10% cocoa. “Asterisk” denotes statistically significant at P < 0.05, ns, nonsignificant.

  • Evaluation of the bioactive properties of avenanthramide analogs produced in recombinant yeast

    Evaluation of the bioactive properties of avenanthramide analogs produced in recombinant yeast

    Yavs enter the cells and accumulate into cytosolic regions. Yav II uptake in HeLa cells as revealed by confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging. HeLa cells incubated with 150 µM Yav II displayed a strong cytoplasmic accumulation of Yav II fluorescence (arrowheads), which was excluded from the nucleus (n), reached a maximum after 2 h (A, B), and lasted for more than 24 h (C, D), although at progressively reduced intensities. Projections of multiple optical sections are presented in A and C, and overlayed to the corresponding bright field images in B and D. Bars = 30 µm.

  • Human carotid atherosclerotic lesion protein components decrease cholesterol biosynthesis rate in macrophages through 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase regulation

    Human carotid atherosclerotic lesion protein components decrease cholesterol biosynthesis rate in macrophages through 3‐hydroxy‐3‐methylglutaryl‐CoA reductase regulation

    The active components within the plaque are neither cholesterol nor lipoproteins but probably a protein and phospholipid. (A) Cells were cultured in 5% of FCS DMEM in six-well plates. Homogenate or diethyl ether extract of the homogenate was added to the cell medium (protein, 300 g/mL) for 24 h. The medium was then removed and cell cholesterol biosynthesis was analyzed as described in Section 2. (B) Lipids of six different pools of homogenates (three plaques for each pool) were extracted with hexane:isopropanol (3:2 v/v) and cholesterol mass was measured using a CHOL kit (Roche Diagnostics GMbH, Mannheim, Germany). Cholesterol mass of each pool was plotted against the capability of decreasing macrophage cholesterol biosynthesis. (C) Homogenate lipoproteins were separated by ultracentrifugation on KBr density. Homogenate, homogenate without LP (lipoproteins) or lipoproteins of the homogenate were added to the cell medium and cholesterol biosynthesis was analyzed after 24 h. (D) Homogenate was cut off by centrifugal filter tubes of 30 Kd followed by centrifugal filter tubes of 10 Kd or extracted with Chloroform:Methanol (3:2). Each fraction was added to the cells for 24 h and cholesterol biosynthesis was measured. (E) Homogenate was boiled for 10 min and added to the cells for 24 h and cholesterol biosynthesis was measured.

  • Association between serum level of ubiquinol and NT-proBNP, a marker for chronic heart failure, in healthy elderly subjects

    Association between serum level of ubiquinol and NT‐proBNP, a marker for chronic heart failure, in healthy elderly subjects

    Distribution of age in this study population (n = 914) including a Gaussian normal distribution curve.

  • Nrf2 sensitizes prostate cancer cells to radiation via decreasing basal ROS levels

    Nrf2 sensitizes prostate cancer cells to radiation via decreasing basal ROS levels

    Phamaceutical Nrf2 upregulation by SFN diminished basal ROS of 22RV1 cells. SFN induced increased Nrf2 level and decreased KEAP1 level (Fig. A); Expressions of panel of Nrf2-related genes in response to SFN treatment (Fig. B); ROS profiling showing decreased ROS level with SFN treatment (C-D); SFN sensitized 22RV1 cells to radiation similar to ADT in colony formation assay (E); SFN = Sulforaphane; T = testosterone; Bic = bicalutamide (n = 3, ** P < 0.01, SFN = 10 μM).

  • Anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanism of delphinidin 3-sambubioside, a Hibiscus anthocyanin

    Anti‐inflammatory activity and molecular mechanism of delphinidin 3‐sambubioside, a Hibiscus anthocyanin

    Dp3-Sam and Dp downregulate NF-κB signaling pathway. RAW264.7 cells were pretreated with the indicated concentration of Dp3-Sam or Dp for 30 min, and then exposed to 1 µg/mL LPS for 10 min. IκB-α, p-p65, p-IKKα/β, and α-tubulin were detected with their antibodies, respectively. The induction fold of the phosphorylated kinase was calculated as the intensity of the treatment relative to that of control normalized to α-tubulin by densitometry. The blots shown are the examples of three separate experiments.

  • Dietary cocoa protects against colitis‐associated cancer by activating the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway
  • Evaluation of the bioactive properties of avenanthramide analogs produced in recombinant yeast
  • Human carotid atherosclerotic lesion protein components decrease cholesterol biosynthesis rate in macrophages through 3‐hydroxy‐3‐methylglutaryl‐CoA reductase regulation
  • Association between serum level of ubiquinol and NT‐proBNP, a marker for chronic heart failure, in healthy elderly subjects
  • Nrf2 sensitizes prostate cancer cells to radiation via decreasing basal ROS levels
  • Anti‐inflammatory activity and molecular mechanism of delphinidin 3‐sambubioside, a Hibiscus anthocyanin

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2014 BioFactors - Wiley Young Investigator Award

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On behalf of the IUBMB, BioFactors, and Wiley, it is with great pleasure and honor that we announce Juewon Kim as the recipient of the 2014 BioFactors - Wiley Young Investigator Award for his article, A DAF-16/FoxO3a-dependent longevity signal is initiated by antioxidants.

Mr. Kim is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Tokyo in Chiba, Japan, where he earned a Masters Degree in Biological Sciences, and is a Senior Researcher at Amorepacific Inc. in the Beauty Food Research Institute where he conducts basic research for biological cosmetics as well as basic and applied research for functional food. He will be honored with the 2014 BioFactors - Wiley Young Investigator Award at the 15th IUBMB - 24th FAOBMB - TSBMB Conference this October 21 - 26, in Taipei, Taiwan, and his award-winning article will be FREELY available online through the conference.

Please join us in congratulating Mr. Kim as the recipient of the annual BioFactors – Wiley Young Investigator Award!

IUBMB Joint Virtual Issue on Cancer Therapies

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We’re pleased to present a new Joint Virtual Issue on Cancer Therapies in celebration of the IUBMB 2015 Miami Winter Symposium, featuring articles from Biofactors, Biotechnology and Applied Biochemistry, and IUBMB Life.

Open Access Highlight

Click below to read this OnlineOpen Review Article in BioFactors for FREE:

Novel insights on interactions between folate and lipid metabolism
Robin P. da Silva, Karen B. Kelly, Ala Al Rajabi, René L. Jacobs
Volume 40, Issue 3, May/June 2014

Folate is an essential B vitamin required for the maintenance of AdoMet-dependent methylation. The liver is responsible for many methylation reactions that are used for post-translational modifications of proteins, methylation of DNA, and the synthesis of hormones, creatine, carnitine, and phosphatidylcholine. Conditions where methylation capacity is compromised, including folate deficiency, are associated with impaired phospatidylcholine synthesis resulting in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis. Read the full article FREE!

Now in EarlyView

Fructooligosaccharides suppress high-fat diet-induced fat accumulation in C57BL/6J mice
Yuko Nakamura, Midori Natsume, Akiko Yasuda, Mihoko Ishizaka, Keiko Kawahata, Jinichiro Koga

Alterations in human muscle protein metabolism with aging: Protein and exercise as countermeasures to offset sarcopenia
Tyler A. Churchward-Venne, Leigh Breen, Stuart M. Phillips

Mitochondrial ascorbic acid is responsible for enhanced susceptibility of U937 cells to the toxic effects of peroxynitrite
Andrea Guidarelli, Liana Cerioni, Mara Fiorani, Catia Azzolini, Orazio Cantoni

ATP-binding cassette transporters in live
Katrin Wlcek, Bruno Stieger

A DAF-16/FoxO3a-dependent longevity signal is initiated by antioxidants
Juewon Kim, Naoko Ishihara, Tae Ryong Lee

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