BioFactors

Cover image for Vol. 41 Issue 1

Edited By: Angelo Azzi

Impact Factor: 3.0

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 57/124 (Endocrinology & Metabolism); 130/291 (Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)

Online ISSN: 1872-8081

Associated Title(s): Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, Biotechnology and Applied Biochemistry, IUBMB Life

Featured

  • ABCA1 and nascent HDL biogenesis

    ABCA1 and nascent HDL biogenesis

    Domain structure of ABCA1. ABCA1 has 12 membrane spanning domains, two intracellular nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), and two large extracellular domains (ECD1 and ECD2). The positions of the Tangier disease mutations in ECD1 and ECD2 that helped solve different activities of ABCA1 are shown, as is a site directed mutation in the first NBD which abolishes ATP hydrolysis and lipid efflux.

  • Bone mineralization is regulated by signaling cross talk between molecular factors of local and systemic origin: The role of fibroblast growth factor 23

    Bone mineralization is regulated by signaling cross talk between molecular factors of local and systemic origin: The role of fibroblast growth factor 23

    FGF23 production by osteocytes is regulated by both bone local and systemic factors.

  • Green tea polyphenol EGCG suppresses Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting GSK-3β- and PP2A-independent β-catenin phosphorylation/degradation

    Green tea polyphenol EGCG suppresses Wnt/β‐catenin signaling by promoting GSK‐3β‐ and PP2A‐independent β‐catenin phosphorylation/degradation

    EGCG promotes the degradation of β-catenin through a β-TrCP-dependent proteasomal degradation pathway. A: Cytosolic proteins were prepared from HEK293-FL reporter cells treated with vehicle (DMSO) or indicated concentrations of EGCG in the presence of Wnt3a-CM for 15 H and then subjected to Western blotting with an anit-β-catenin antibody. B: Semi-quantitative RT-PCR for β-catenin and GAPDH was performed using total RNA prepared from HEK293-FL reporter cells treated with vehicle (DMSO) or the indicated concentrations of EGCG in the presence of Wnt3a-CM for 15 H. C: Cytosolic proteins prepared from HEK293-FL reporter cells that were incubated with vehicle (DMSO) or EGCG (40 µM) in the presence of Wnt3a-CM and exposed to MG-132 (10 µM) for 8 H were subjected to Western blotting with anti-β-catenin antibody. D: HEK293 cells were co-transfected with the Δβ-TrCP expression plasmid and then incubated with the vehicle (DMSO) or EGCG (40 µM) in the presence of Wnt3a-CM for 15 H. Cytosolic proteins were subjected to Western blotting with anti-β-catenin or anti-myc antibodies. In A, C, and D, to confirm equal loading, the blot was re-probed with an anti-actin antibody.

  • Comparison of in vivo and in vitro digestion on polyphenol composition in lingonberries: Potential impact on colonic health

    Comparison of in vivo and in vitro digestion on polyphenol composition in lingonberries: Potential impact on colonic health

    HPLC profiles at 280 nm showing (A) the polyphenol composition of lingonberry and (B) the ileal fluid collected in the 0 to 7 h after the ingestion of 150 g of lingonberries by a volunteer with an ileostomy. Peak: (P1) dimer B; (P2) trimer B; (P3) trimer B; (P4) dimer B; (P5) trimer A; (P6) dimer B; (P7) trimer B; (P8) dimer A; (P9) trimer A; (P10) dimer A; (P11) trimer A; (P12) trimer B; (P13) dimer A; (P14) ferulic acid; (P15) ferulic acid hexoside; (P16) trimer B; (P17) quercetin-3-O-galactoside; (P18) quercetin-3-O-hexoside-deoxyhexoside; (P19) quercetin-O-xyloside; (P20) quercetin-O-arabinoside; (P21) quercetin-3-O-arabinofuranoside; (P22) quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside; (P23) quercetin-3-O-HMG)-rhamnoside; (M1 and M2) epicatechin sulfates; (M3 and M9) ferulic acid sulfates; (M4-M6, M8) O-methyl-(epi)-catechin-O-sulfates and (M7 and M10) quercetin glucuronides. For identification by MS/MS and quantification of peaks P1-P23 and M1-M10 see Table .

  • Biological parameters influencing the human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells' response to retinoic acid

    Biological parameters influencing the human umbilical cord‐derived mesenchymal stem cells' response to retinoic acid

    A: Photomicrograph of RA-treated HUCMSCs stained with EB/AO in which orange non-fragmented chromatin appears to belong to the necrotic cells, and apoptotic cells show a green fragmented nucleus. Thin arrow = early apoptotic cell, thick arrow = late apoptotic cell, and dashed arrow = necrotic cell. B: Graph illustrating DAPI and EB/AO stained cells with blebbed cytoplasm and apoptotic or necrotic appearance in HUCMSCs treated with 10−7 M RA and untreated cells. (**P < 0.01 and *P < 0.05). C: TUNEL stained cells in control, and D: RA-treated cells representing a brown fragmented nucleus.

  • Preparation of morusin from Ramulus mori and its effects on mice with transplanted H22 hepatocarcinoma

    Preparation of morusin from Ramulus mori and its effects on mice with transplanted H22 hepatocarcinoma

    Relative genes expression of in tumor-bearing mice. “*” and “**” indicate P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively, compared with the model group; n = 7.

  • Chebulagic acid from Terminalia chebula enhances insulin mediated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes via PPARγ signaling pathway

    Chebulagic acid from Terminalia chebula enhances insulin mediated glucose uptake in 3T3‐L1 adipocytes via PPARγ signaling pathway

    Docking configurations of CHA in to PPARγ. Docking simulation was performed to identify interaction between PPARγ and CHA using the Software: iGEMDOCKv2.1 and Autodock 4.2. (A) and (B) Docking modes of CHA on human PPARγ using Autodock 4.2. and iGEMDOCKv2, respectively (C) H-bonding between residues of PPARγ and CHA as obtained from Autodock 4.2.

  • ABCA1 and nascent HDL biogenesis
  • Bone mineralization is regulated by signaling cross talk between molecular factors of local and systemic origin: The role of fibroblast growth factor 23
  • Green tea polyphenol EGCG suppresses Wnt/β‐catenin signaling by promoting GSK‐3β‐ and PP2A‐independent β‐catenin phosphorylation/degradation
  • Comparison of in vivo and in vitro digestion on polyphenol composition in lingonberries: Potential impact on colonic health
  • Biological parameters influencing the human umbilical cord‐derived mesenchymal stem cells' response to retinoic acid
  • Preparation of morusin from Ramulus mori and its effects on mice with transplanted H22 hepatocarcinoma
  • Chebulagic acid from Terminalia chebula enhances insulin mediated glucose uptake in 3T3‐L1 adipocytes via PPARγ signaling pathway

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2014 BioFactors - Wiley Young Investigator Award

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On behalf of the IUBMB, BioFactors, and Wiley, it is with great pleasure and honor that we announce Juewon Kim as the recipient of the 2014 BioFactors - Wiley Young Investigator Award for his article, A DAF-16/FoxO3a-dependent longevity signal is initiated by antioxidants.

Mr. Kim is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Tokyo in Chiba, Japan, where he earned a Masters Degree in Biological Sciences, and is a Senior Researcher at Amorepacific Inc. in the Beauty Food Research Institute where he conducts basic research for biological cosmetics as well as basic and applied research for functional food. He will be honored with the 2014 BioFactors - Wiley Young Investigator Award at the 15th IUBMB - 24th FAOBMB - TSBMB Conference this October 21 - 26, in Taipei, Taiwan, and his award-winning article will be FREELY available online through the conference.

Please join us in congratulating Mr. Kim as the recipient of the annual BioFactors – Wiley Young Investigator Award!

IUBMB Joint Virtual Issue on Cancer Therapies

BTPR online only


We’re pleased to present a new Joint Virtual Issue on Cancer Therapies in celebration of the IUBMB 2015 Miami Winter Symposium, featuring articles from Biofactors, Biotechnology and Applied Biochemistry, and IUBMB Life.

Open Access Highlight

Click below to read this OnlineOpen Review Article in BioFactors for FREE:

Novel insights on interactions between folate and lipid metabolism
Robin P. da Silva, Karen B. Kelly, Ala Al Rajabi, René L. Jacobs
Volume 40, Issue 3, May/June 2014

Folate is an essential B vitamin required for the maintenance of AdoMet-dependent methylation. The liver is responsible for many methylation reactions that are used for post-translational modifications of proteins, methylation of DNA, and the synthesis of hormones, creatine, carnitine, and phosphatidylcholine. Conditions where methylation capacity is compromised, including folate deficiency, are associated with impaired phospatidylcholine synthesis resulting in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis. Read the full article FREE!

Now in EarlyView

Fructooligosaccharides suppress high-fat diet-induced fat accumulation in C57BL/6J mice
Yuko Nakamura, Midori Natsume, Akiko Yasuda, Mihoko Ishizaka, Keiko Kawahata, Jinichiro Koga

Alterations in human muscle protein metabolism with aging: Protein and exercise as countermeasures to offset sarcopenia
Tyler A. Churchward-Venne, Leigh Breen, Stuart M. Phillips

Mitochondrial ascorbic acid is responsible for enhanced susceptibility of U937 cells to the toxic effects of peroxynitrite
Andrea Guidarelli, Liana Cerioni, Mara Fiorani, Catia Azzolini, Orazio Cantoni

ATP-binding cassette transporters in live
Katrin Wlcek, Bruno Stieger

A DAF-16/FoxO3a-dependent longevity signal is initiated by antioxidants
Juewon Kim, Naoko Ishihara, Tae Ryong Lee

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