BioFactors

Cover image for Vol. 40 Issue 5

Edited By: Angelo Azzi

Impact Factor: 3.0

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 57/124 (Endocrinology & Metabolism); 130/291 (Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)

Online ISSN: 1872-8081

Associated Title(s): Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, Biotechnology and Applied Biochemistry, IUBMB Life

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  • Bone morphogenetic proteins: A powerful osteoinductive compound with non-negligible side effects and limitations

    Bone morphogenetic proteins: A powerful osteoinductive compound with non‐negligible side effects and limitations

    BMP-2 signaling pathways. Canonical Smad-dependent pathway is initiated by binding of the BMP ligands to a heteromeric complex of type I (BMPR-I, Alk1, Alk2, Alk3, and Alk6) and type II (BMPR-II, Act-II, and Act-IIB) transmembrane receptors. Subsequently, the type II receptor phosphorylates and thus activates the type I receptor, which in turn phosphorylates Smad1, 5, and 8 (R-Smads). The phosphorylated R-Smads then form a complex with Smad 4 (Co-Smad) and translocate into the nucleus to modulate the transcription of target gene that regulate bone healing and regeneration. Smad 6 and Smad 7 (I-Smads) can either prevent association of R-Smads with Smad-4 or directly inactive type I receptor and thereby inhibit R-Smads phosphorylation. Besides signaling via Smads, the BMP signal can also be transduced via activation of p38 (MAPK14), ERK (MAPK1) and JNK (MAPK8) by a complex composed of TAK1 (MAP3K7IP1), its activator called TAB1 (MAP3K7) and the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). MAPKs are transported into the nucleus and activate transcriptional factors initiating specific gene expression. On the other hand, activation of PI3 kinase (PI3K) via the mentioned complex leads to transcriptional regulation by Akt and non-transcriptional regulation (like direct regulation of cytoskeleton re-arrangement) by Rho GTPase pathways.

  • In vivo protective effects of dietary curcumin and capsaicin against alcohol-induced oxidative stress

    In vivo protective effects of dietary curcumin and capsaicin against alcohol‐induced oxidative stress

    Side-effect of chronic curcumin consumption with ethanol treatment.

  • Can proline-rich polypeptide complex mimic the effect of nerve growth factor?

    Can proline‐rich polypeptide complex mimic the effect of nerve growth factor?

    (a) Effect of NGF on level of cGMP released by PC12 cells. PC12 cells were placed in a medium without serum. Before the experiment, endogenous phosphatases were inhibited by addition of IBMX inhibitor (10 μM). Then cells were incubated with NGF (0.1 μg/mL/106cells) for 3 h at 37°C. ODQ (0.3 μM) was used as selective inhibitor of sGC, and was added to the medium 30 min before NGF as indicated. cGMP level was examined using a competitive cGMP enzyme immunoassay. The data are the mean ± SD (n = 4). *P ≤ 0.05, statistically significant difference in the value between NGF-treated and nontreated control cells; **P ≤ 0.05, statistically significant difference in the value between NGF + ODQ/NGF + l-NAME and NGF (Student's t-test for dependent samples). (b) Effect of PRP on level of cGMP released by PC12 cells. PC12 cells were placed in a medium without serum. Before the experiment, endogenous phosphatases were inhibited by addition of IBMX inhibitor (10 μM). Then cells were incubated with PRP (0.1 μg/mL/106 cells) for 3 h at 37°C. ODQ (0.3 μM) was used as selective inhibitor of sGC, and was added to the medium 30 min before PRP as indicated. cGMP level was examined using a competitive cGMP enzyme immunoassay. The data are the mean ± SD (n = 4). *P ≤ 0.05, statistically significant difference in the value between PRP-treated and nontreated control cells; **P ≤ 0.05, statistically significant difference in the value between PRP + ODQ/PRP + l-NAME and PRP (Student's t-test for dependent samples). (c) Effect of NP on level of cGMP released by PC12 cells. PC12 cells were placed in a medium without serum. Before the experiment, endogenous phosphatases were inhibited by addition of IBMX inhibitor (10 μM). Then cells were incubated with NP (0.1 μg/mL/106cells) for 3 h at 37°C. ODQ (0.3 μM) was used as selective inhibitor of sGC, and was added to the medium 30 min before NP as indicated. cGMP level was examined using a competitive cGMP enzyme immunoassay. The data are the mean ± SD (n = 4). *P ≤ 0.05, statistically significant difference in the value between NP-treated and nontreated control cells; **P ≤ 0.05, statistically significant difference in the value between NP + ODQ/NP + l-NAME and NP (Student's t-test for dependent samples).

  • Curcumin improves hypoxia induced dysfunctions in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by protecting mitochondria and down regulating inflammation

    Curcumin improves hypoxia induced dysfunctions in 3T3‐L1 adipocytes by protecting mitochondria and down regulating inflammation

    Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation determined by H2DCFDA incorporation in normoxic and hypoxic groups. (A) The representative images of ROS-induced fluorescence. (a) normoxia; (b) hypoxia; (c, d, e) hypoxic cells treated with 5, 10, and 20 µM of curcumin; (f) hypoxic cells treated with acriflavine (5 µM), respectively. Scale bar: 100 µm. (B) Flow cytometric analysis of the intracellular ROS-Histograms represent % of population of cells with fluorescence. (a) normoxia; (b) hypoxia; (c, d, e) hypoxic cells treated with 5, 10, and 20 µM of curcumin; f hypoxic cells treated with acriflavine (5 µM), respectively. (C) Statistical analysis of the flow cytometry data. Values are means, with standard deviations represented by vertical bars (n = 3). * Mean value is significantly different from the control cells (P < 0.05). # Mean values are significantly different from hypoxia treated cells (P < 0.05).

  • HDL3 stimulates paraoxonase 1 antiatherogenic catalytic and biological activities in a macrophage model system: In vivo and in vitro studies

    HDL3 stimulates paraoxonase 1 antiatherogenic catalytic and biological activities in a macrophage model system: In vivo and in vitro studies

    The effects of HDL + rePON1 injection into C57BL/6 mice on their MPM atherogenicity. Mice (n = 10) were injected IP (3 days after thioglycolate injection) with human HDL (250µg protein/mouse) alone, or with rePON1 (50 µg/mL) alone, or with HDL that was pre-incubated with rePON1 for 1 H at 37°C. Control mice were injected with saline. Peritoneal macrophages were harvested from each mouse 20 H post-injection and the following analyses were performed: (A) MPM PON1 arylesterase activity, (B) MPM oxidative status (by DCFH assay), (C) HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux rate, and (D) Basal rate (no acceptor added) of cholesterol efflux from the cells. Results are expressed as mean ± SD of all mice in each treated group. *P < 0.01 vs. Control MPM; #P < 0.01 vs. MPM from HDL-injected mice.

  • Bone morphogenetic proteins: A powerful osteoinductive compound with non‐negligible side effects and limitations
  • In vivo protective effects of dietary curcumin and capsaicin against alcohol‐induced oxidative stress
  • Can proline‐rich polypeptide complex mimic the effect of nerve growth factor?
  • Curcumin improves hypoxia induced dysfunctions in 3T3‐L1 adipocytes by protecting mitochondria and down regulating inflammation
  • HDL3 stimulates paraoxonase 1 antiatherogenic catalytic and biological activities in a macrophage model system: In vivo and in vitro studies

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2014 BioFactors - Wiley Young Investigator Award

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On behalf of the IUBMB, BioFactors, and Wiley, it is with great pleasure and honor that we announce Juewon Kim as the recipient of the 2014 BioFactors - Wiley Young Investigator Award for his article, A DAF-16/FoxO3a-dependent longevity signal is initiated by antioxidants.

Mr. Kim is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Tokyo in Chiba, Japan, where he earned a Masters Degree in Biological Sciences, and is a Senior Researcher at Amorepacific Inc. in the Beauty Food Research Institute where he conducts basic research for biological cosmetics as well as basic and applied research for functional food. He will be honored with the 2014 BioFactors - Wiley Young Investigator Award at the 15th IUBMB - 24th FAOBMB - TSBMB Conference this October 21 - 26, in Taipei, Taiwan, and his award-winning article will be FREELY available online through the conference.

Please join us in congratulating Mr. Kim as the recipient of the annual BioFactors – Wiley Young Investigator Award!

15th IUBMB - 24th FAOBMB - TSBMB International Conference, Taipei, Taiwan

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in Transition: from Basic to Translational

15th IUBMB - 24th FAOBMB - TSBMB International Conference

Open Access Highlight

Click below to read this OnlineOpen Review Article in BioFactors for FREE:

Novel insights on interactions between folate and lipid metabolism
Robin P. da Silva, Karen B. Kelly, Ala Al Rajabi, René L. Jacobs
Volume 40, Issue 3, May/June 2014

Folate is an essential B vitamin required for the maintenance of AdoMet-dependent methylation. The liver is responsible for many methylation reactions that are used for post-translational modifications of proteins, methylation of DNA, and the synthesis of hormones, creatine, carnitine, and phosphatidylcholine. Conditions where methylation capacity is compromised, including folate deficiency, are associated with impaired phospatidylcholine synthesis resulting in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis. Read the full article FREE!

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Alterations in human muscle protein metabolism with aging: Protein and exercise as countermeasures to offset sarcopenia
Tyler A. Churchward-Venne, Leigh Breen, Stuart M. Phillips

Mitochondrial ascorbic acid is responsible for enhanced susceptibility of U937 cells to the toxic effects of peroxynitrite
Andrea Guidarelli, Liana Cerioni, Mara Fiorani, Catia Azzolini, Orazio Cantoni

ATP-binding cassette transporters in live
Katrin Wlcek, Bruno Stieger

A DAF-16/FoxO3a-dependent longevity signal is initiated by antioxidants
Juewon Kim, Naoko Ishihara, Tae Ryong Lee

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