Cancer Cytopathology

Cover image for Vol. 125 Issue 5

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Celeste N. Powers, MD, PhD

Impact Factor: 3.183

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 17/79 (Pathology); 89/213 (Oncology)

Online ISSN: 1934-6638

Associated Title(s): Cancer, CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians

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  1. Original Articles

    1. The impact of noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features on the performance of the Afirma gene expression classifier

      Jen-Fan Hang, William H. Westra, David S. Cooper and Syed Z. Ali

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21879

      Reclassification of thyroid tumors using the newly proposed nomenclature of noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP) significantly decreases the positive predictive value of the Afirma test in patients with indeterminate thyroid nodules. Nevertheless, the majority of individuals with indeterminate thyroid nodules with a suspicious Afirma result in the study institution have undergone total thyroidectomy, which raises concerns over reliance on a suspicious Afirma result by clinicians to justify total thyroidectomy.

    2. Three-year risk of high-grade CIN for women aged 30 years or older who undergo baseline Pap cytology and HPV co-screening

      Ming Guo, Abha Khanna, Jianping Wang, Marilyn A. Dawlett, Teresa L. Kologinczak, Genevieve R. Lyons, Roland L. Bassett Jr, Nour Sneige, Yun Gong and Therese B. Bevers

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21877

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      The 3-year follow-up study of women with Papanicolaou (Pap)/human papillomavirus (HPV) cotesting in a cancer prevention center presented herein demonstrates a high efficacy of Pap/HPV cotesting to stratify the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of type 3. The results of the current study confirm the safety of a 3-year screening interval for women with a Pap-negative/HPV-negative cotesting result.

  2. Help Desk

    1. Why is digital pathology in cytopathology lagging behind surgical pathology?

      Matthew G. Hanna and Liron Pantanowitz

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21855

  3. Original Articles

    1. Consistency and reproducibility of next-generation sequencing and other multigene mutational assays: A worldwide ring trial study on quantitative cytological molecular reference specimens

      Umberto Malapelle, Clara Mayo-de-Las-Casas, Miguel A. Molina-Vila, Rafael Rosell, Spasenija Savic, Michel Bihl, Lukas Bubendorf, Manuel Salto-Tellez, Dario de Biase, Giovanni Tallini, David H. Hwang, Lynette M. Sholl, Rajyalakshmi Luthra, Birgit Weynand, Sara Vander Borght, Edoardo Missiaglia, Massimo Bongiovanni, Daniel Stieber, Philippe Vielh, Fernando Schmitt, Alessandra Rappa, Massimo Barberis, Francesco Pepe, Pasquale Pisapia, Nicola Serra, Elena Vigliar, Claudio Bellevicine, Matteo Fassan, Massimo Rugge, Carlos E. de Andrea, Maria D. Lozano, Fulvio Basolo, Gabriella Fontanini, Yuri E. Nikiforov, Suzanne Kamel-Reid, Gilda da Cunha Santos, Marina N. Nikiforova, Sinchita Roy-Chowdhuri, Giancarlo Troncone and The Molecular Cytopathology Meeting Group

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21868

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      This interlaboratory ring trial study shows that next-generation sequencing and other multigene mutational assays are robust and accurate with cytological samples. In particular, the performance of laboratories using next-generation sequencing is excellent, regardless of the platform or gene panel type.

  4. Commentary

    1. Programmed death-ligand 1 immunohistochemistry testing for non-small cell lung cancer in practice

      Mari Mino-Kenudson

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21873

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      Given the recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration of an anti-programmed cell death protein 1 agent as a first-line therapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing has become routine in pathology laboratories in the United States. Each pathology laboratory needs to select a PD-L1 IHC assay among the multiple assays available, conduct appropriate optimization and validation processes, and pay close attention to appropriate preanalytical tissue handling and the selection of optimal tissue samples. See also pages 000-000.

    2. Programmed cell death ligand 1 as a biomarker in head and neck cancer

      Sara I. Pai and William C. Faquin

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21872

      The evaluation of programmed cell death ligand 1 has a potential role in the application of immune checkpoint inhibitors for select cancers of the head and neck. See related commentary on pages 000-000.

  5. Original Articles

    1. miR-130A as a diagnostic marker to differentiate malignant mesothelioma from lung adenocarcinoma in pleural effusion cytology

      Rocco Cappellesso, Marco Galasso, Lorenzo Nicolè, Paolo Dabrilli, Stefano Volinia and Ambrogio Fassina

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21869

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      MicroRNA (miRNA) expression analysis could be a viable diagnostic tool with which to differentiate epithelioid malignant mesothelioma from lung adenocarcinoma. miR-130a quantification could be used reliably as a second-level diagnostic tool to differentiate malignant mesothelioma from lung adenocarcinoma in pleural effusion cytology, mainly in those cases with ambiguous or negative immunohistochemistry.

    2. Histiocytic sarcoma: New insights into FNA cytomorphology and molecular characteristics

      Yin P. Hung, Scott B. Lovitch and Xiaohua Qian

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21851

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      The presence of pleomorphic and epithelioid large cells with binucleation and/or multinucleation in an inflammatory background, especially in patients with a history of a lymphoproliferative disorder, should suggest histiocytic sarcoma and prompt judicious use of histiocytic lineage markers. The detection of recurrent lysine methyltransferase 2D/mixed-lineage leukemia 2 alterations in histiocytic sarcoma, which are also present in follicular lymphoma, supports the notion of transdifferentiation from a genetically similar but phenotypically distinct tumor of a different lineage.

  6. Correspondence

    1. “…That which we call a Rose…”: A critical analysis of rapid on-site evaluation

      Britt-Marie Ljung and Joshua R. Menke

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21864

  7. Original Articles

    1. Nodular oncocytic hyperplasia: Can cytomorphology allow for the preoperative diagnosis of a nonneoplastic salivary disease?

      Lisa M. Rooper, Mine Onenerk, Momin T. Siddiqui, William C. Faquin, Justin A. Bishop and Syed Z. Ali

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21865

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      Fine-needle aspiration of salivary oncocytosis produces paucicellular specimens comprised of small groups of oncocytic cells. These findings should suggest a diagnosis of oncocytosis, particularly in elderly patients with multiple salivary nodules.

    2. Adequacy criteria for thyroid FNA evaluated by ThinPrep slides only

      Marina Vivero, Andrew A. Renshaw and Jeffrey F. Krane

      Version of Record online: 7 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21858

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      Reducing the threshold for adequacy in thyroid fine-needle aspirates examined with ThinPrep only does not significantly affect test performance and prevents additional unnecessary procedures.

    3. Columnar cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma: Cytomorphological characteristics of 11 cases with histological correlation and literature review

      Massimo Bongiovanni, Maxime Mermod, Sule Canberk, Chiara Saglietti, Gerasimos P. Sykiotis, Marc Pusztaszeri, Moira Ragazzi, Luca Mazzucchelli, Luca Giovanella and Simonetta Piana

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21860

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      The columnar cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma is a rare and poorly described subtype, the diagnosis of which often is missed on fine-needle aspiration cytology. Its distinguishing cytomorphological features are hypercellular smears with papillary structures covered by cells with pseudostratified nuclei and a paucity of nuclear pseudoinclusions and nuclear grooves.

    4. Alternative lengthening of telomeres and ATRX/DAXX loss can be reliably detected in FNAs of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

      Christopher J. VandenBussche, Derek B. Allison, Mindy K. Graham, Vivek Charu, Anne Marie Lennon, Christopher L. Wolfgang, Ralph H. Hruban and Christopher M. Heaphy

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21857

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      Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors commonly rely on the alternative lengthening of telomeres pathway for telomere maintenance, which correlates with ATRX/DAXX alterations and poor outcomes in primary pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The authors found that both telomere-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization for alternative lengthening of telomeres and ATRX/DAXX immunohistochemistry can be accurately performed on fine needle aspiration specimens with adequate material.

    5. Cytologic features and clinical implications of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells of the pancreas: An analysis of 15 cases

      Michelle D. Reid, Takashi Muraki, Kim HooKim, Bahar Memis, Rondell P. Graham, Daniela Allende, Jiaqi Shi, David F. Schaeffer, Remmi Singh, Olca Basturk and Volkan Adsay

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21859

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      Undifferentiated pancreatic carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells is a rare malignant tumor that is typically large, frequently has a ductal component, and exhibits 3 classical cell types, including benign osteoclastic giant cells, malignant pleomorphic giant cells, and spindled/histiocytoid tumor cells, making cytologic diagnosis possible in most cases.

    6. p16/Ki-67 dual labeling and urinary cytology results according to the New Paris System for Reporting Urinary Cytology: Impact of extended follow-up

      Eric Piaton, Anne-Sophie Advenier, Christian Carré, Myriam Decaussin-Petrucci, Florence Mège-Lechevallier, Karine Hutin, Cindy Nennig, Marc Colombel and Alain Ruffion

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21853

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      The long-term evaluation of p16/Ki-67 dual labeling in urine cytology can help to identify underlying high-grade urothelial carcinoma and progression cases in patients with negative or low-grade urinary cytology results. This finding has potential implications for the clinical management of patients after the conservative treatment of non–muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma.

  8. Commentary

    1. Biobanking and cytopathology: Challenges and opportunities from a Brazilian perspective

      Antonio Hugo J.F.M. Campos, Dirce Maria Carraro and Fernando Augusto Soares

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21836

      Fine-needle aspiration specimens are a valuable resource for health research, but their use in routine biobanking remains limited. To stimulate the creation of biobanks of fine-needle aspiration-derived samples, cytopathologists should play a central role in the discussion of the issues specific to this activity.

  9. Original Articles

    1. Agreement between cytotechnologists and cytopathologists as a new measure of cytopathologist performance in gynecologic cytology

      Andrew M. Quinn, Abu T. Minhajuddin, Linda S. Hynan, Joan S. Reisch and Edmund S. Cibas

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21856

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      This study presents a cytotechnologist-cytopathologist interpretation comparison that provides insight into the assumptions that cytopathologists' interpretations are correct and that they are rendered independently of cytotechnologists' interpretations. By randomly selecting gynecologic cytology specimens evaluated over a 10-year period for comparison with a weighted κ statistic, this study has identified outlier cytopathologists who do not demonstrate good agreement with high-concordance cytotechnologists, thus providing a more nuanced impression of cytopathologist performance.

    2. Next-generation sequencing of urine specimens: A novel platform for genomic analysis in patients with non–muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma treated with bacille Calmette-Guérin

      Sasinya N. Scott, Irina Ostrovnaya, Caroline M. Lin, Nancy Bouvier, Bernard H. Bochner, Gopakumar Iyer, David Solit, Michael F. Berger and Oscar Lin

      Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21847

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      Urine cytology specimens represent a novel platform for next-generation sequencing of high-grade non–muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma. Several genomic alterations identified in urine specimens might be associated with histological features and clinical characteristics.

    3. Percutaneous biopsy of the renal mass: FNA or core needle biopsy?

      Chi-Shun Yang, Euna Choi, Muhammad T. Idrees, Shaoxiong Chen and Howard H. Wu

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21852

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      Both fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy (CB) demonstrate excellent diagnostic accuracy when diagnosing renal neoplasia. There is a synergistic diagnostic advantage to combining FNA and CB techniques that appears to significantly improve the diagnostic rate when compared with FNA alone (92% vs 72%; P<.05), and also appears to be better than the use of CB alone (92% vs 87%).

  10. Bridging the Gap

  11. Original Articles

    1. Can noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features be distinguished from classic papillary thyroid carcinoma and follicular adenomas by fine-needle aspiration?

      Tamar C. Brandler, Fang Zhou, Cheng Z. Liu, Margaret Cho, Ryan P. Lau, Aylin Simsir, Kepal N. Patel and Wei Sun

      Version of Record online: 10 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21848

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      Noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP), papillary thyroid carcinoma, and follicular adenoma demonstrate several distinguishing features on presurgical fine-needle aspiration evaluation. Although diagnostic confirmation of NIFTP must occur at the time of surgical pathology evaluation, the possibility of NIFTP may be raised at the time of fine-needle aspiration, and a more conservative management approach can be considered.

    2. Improved risk stratification for patients with high-grade urothelial carcinoma following application of the Paris System for Reporting Urinary Cytology

      Morgan L. Cowan, Dorothy L. Rosenthal and Christopher J. VandenBussche

      Version of Record online: 8 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21843

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      This study assesses the impact of The Paris System for Reporting Urinary Cytology criteria on urinary tract cytology specimens from patients with subsequent high-grade urothelial carcinoma. Approximately 40% of urinary tract cytology specimens originally diagnosed as indeterminate are reclassified into higher risk categories without a significant decline in the frequency of high-grade urothelial carcinoma diagnoses, and this suggests that The Paris System for Reporting Urinary Cytology criteria are effective when they are applied to malignant specimens.

    3. Accuracy of next-generation sequencing for the identification of clinically relevant variants in cytology smears in lung adenocarcinoma

      Jordan E. Baum, Pan Zhang, Rana S. Hoda, Brian Geraghty, Hanna Rennert, Navneet Narula and Helen D. Fernandes

      Version of Record online: 8 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cncy.21844

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      Cytologic specimens are routinely used for molecular analyses of lung adenocarcinoma to guide clinical and therapeutic decisions. This study has been designed to assess the adequacy of cytologic smears for the identification of clinically relevant mutations with next-generation sequencing.

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