Autism Research

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 4

Edited By: David G. Amaral, Ph.D

Impact Factor: 4.33

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 3/68 (Psychology Developmental); 6/51 (Behavioral Sciences)

Online ISSN: 1939-3806

Featured

  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: What Does Self-Report with the OCI-R Tell Us?

    Obsessive‐Compulsive Disorder in Adults with High‐Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: What Does Self‐Report with the OCI‐R Tell Us?

    OCI-R subscale scores for the control (n = 92), ASD-(n = 171), ASD + OCD (n = 54), and OCD (n = 108) groups.Note. Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals.

  • Atypical Face Perception in Autism: A Point of View?

    Atypical Face Perception in Autism: A Point of View?

    The four face-view conditions assessed in the present study; A: front-front; B: inverted; C: side-side; D: front-side (view-change condition).

  • 16p11.2 Deletion Syndrome Mice Display Sensory and Ultrasonic Vocalization Deficits During Social Interactions

    16p11.2 Deletion Syndrome Mice Display Sensory and Ultrasonic Vocalization Deficits During Social Interactions

    Reduced social sniffing in 16p11.2 +/− males in the three-phase male-female social interaction test. (A) Cohort 1 +/− males exhibited less anogenital sniffing and following, as compared to +/+ males, during the first male-female interaction session (Phase 1). (C) No genotype differences were detected during the second exposure to the female (Phase 3). (B and D) Cohort 2 +/− males exhibited less anogenital sniffing and less following than +/+ males in Phase 1, and less following in Phase 3. None of the individual social interaction parameter scores was significantly correlated with total numbers of USVs, indicating that social sniffing and vocalization are probably independent measures of response to social cues. Data are presented as mean ± standard error of the mean. *, P < 0.05 +/+ vs. +/−. See Supporting Information, Table S1 for statistical results of Figure .

  • Replication of Standardized ADOS Domain Scores in the Simons Simplex Collection

    Replication of Standardized ADOS Domain Scores in the Simons Simplex Collection

    a: (top, left) Distributions of raw SA domain totals by age/language cells. b: (top, right) c: Distributions of calibrated SA domain scores by age/language cells. (bottom, left) Distributions of raw restricted and repetitive behavior domain totals by age/language cells. d: (bottom, right) Distributions of calibrated restricted and repetitive behavior domain scores by age/language cells.

  • Meta-Analysis of Gene Expression in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Meta‐Analysis of Gene Expression in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Profiles of meta-analyses gene ranks from the blood and brain: raw P-values for each individual dataset are plotted against corrected P-values (FDR) from the meta-analyses. Local polynomial regression (LOESS) is used to obtain a smooth fit. The shaded areas represent 95% confidence intervals of the prediction using the t-based approximation (see “stat_smooth” in the ggplot2 R package).

  • Measuring social attention and motivation in autism spectrum disorder using eye-tracking: Stimulus type matters

    Measuring social attention and motivation in autism spectrum disorder using eye‐tracking: Stimulus type matters

    Representative stimuli for each task: (A) “Static Visual Exploration” task, (B) “Dynamic Visual Exploration” task, and (C) “Interactive Visual Exploration” task.

  • Pitt–Hopkins Mouse Model has Altered Particular Gastrointestinal Transits In Vivo

    Pitt–Hopkins Mouse Model has Altered Particular Gastrointestinal Transits In Vivo

    Particular in vivo gut transit velocities are reduced in PTHS mice. (A) Lengths of intestines. Total (left), small (center) and large (right) intestines were similar in length between the wt and PTHS animals. (B) Gastrointestinal (GI) transit velocities in vivo. Whole-gut transit velocity (left) was similar between the groups. Upper GI (center) and distal colon (right) transit velocities were significantly reduced in the PTHS mice.*P < 0.05, Student's t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test, respectively. Data are shown as mean ± SEM (left and center graphs) or as median ± IQR (right graphs). 18 wt and 16 PTHS mice were used for all the measurements except the upper GI transit. Three animals were excluded from the analysis of the upper GI transit, 1 in wt and 2 in PTHS groups, due to obvious distress signs after the gavage.

  • Obsessive‐Compulsive Disorder in Adults with High‐Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: What Does Self‐Report with the OCI‐R Tell Us?
  • Atypical Face Perception in Autism: A Point of View?
  • 16p11.2 Deletion Syndrome Mice Display Sensory and Ultrasonic Vocalization Deficits During Social Interactions
  • Replication of Standardized ADOS Domain Scores in the Simons Simplex Collection
  • Meta‐Analysis of Gene Expression in Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Measuring social attention and motivation in autism spectrum disorder using eye‐tracking: Stimulus type matters
  • Pitt–Hopkins Mouse Model has Altered Particular Gastrointestinal Transits In Vivo

Recently Published Issues

See all

Editor's Choice

Autism screening and diagnosis in low resource settings: Challenges and opportunities to enhance research and services worldwide
Maureen S. Durkin, Mayada Elsabbagh, Josephine Barbaro, Melissa Gladstone, Francesca Happe, Rosa A. Hoekstra, Li-Ching Lee, Alexia Rattazzi, Jennifer Stapel-Wax, Wendy L. Stone, Helen Tager-Flusberg, Audrey Thurm, Mark Tomlinson and Andy Shih

Most research into the epidemiology, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of autism is based on studies in high income countries. Moreover, within high income countries, individuals of high socioeconomic status are disproportionately represented among participants in autism research. Corresponding disparities in access to autism screening, diagnosis, and treatment exist globally. One of the barriers perpetuating this imbalance is the high cost of proprietary tools for diagnosing autism and for delivering evidence-based therapies. Another barrier is the high cost of training of professionals and para-professionals to use the tools. Open-source and open access models provide a way to facilitate global collaboration and training. Using these models and technologies, the autism scientific community and clinicians worldwide should be able to work more effectively and efficiently than they have to date to address the global imbalance in autism knowledge and at the same time advance our understanding of autism and our ability to deliver cost-effective services to everyone in need.
READ MORE...

Journal News

Improved AUR Turnaround Times:

20.3 calendar days from submission to final decision as of the end of February 2016

Recently Published Articles

Subscribe to RSS headline updates from: Autism Research
Powered by FeedBurner

New Editor-in-Chief and restructuring of the editorial board!

Autism Research welcomes its new Editor-in-Chief and new Associate Editors. Associate Editors will now be responsible for coordinating the peer review process of articles for various sections of the journal. The journal will expand its coverage to all areas of modern research on autism spectrum and related disorders. The new organizational structure will increase the speed to the first decision and will insure the fair review of papers related to all areas of autism research. The new editorial staff will also increase the number of review papers published by the journal to aid in the education of the INSAR membership. Beginning in January of 2015, Autism Research is published online only.

Editor-in-Chief:
David G. Amaral, Ph.D.
UC Davis MIND Institute

Associate Editors:
Evdokia Anagnostou, MD
Bloorview Research Institute (Treatment - including clinical trials)

Peter Mundy, Ph.D.

UC Davis MIND Institute (Psychology/Cognitive Neuroscience)

Ralph-Axel Müller, Ph.D.
San Diego State University (Neuroimaging/Neuropathology)

Craig J. Newschaffer, Ph.D.
A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University (Environmental Factors - Epidemiology, Immunology)

James S. Sutcliffe, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University (Omics)

Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele
, MD
Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute (Model Systems - animal, cellular and computational)

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION