Autism Research

Cover image for Autism Research

Edited By: Anthony J. Bailey

Impact Factor: 3.988

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2012: 5/65 (Psychology Developmental); 6/49 (Behavioral Sciences)

Online ISSN: 1939-3806

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  • Investigation of Maternal Genotype Effects in Autism by Genome-Wide Association

    Investigation of Maternal Genotype Effects in Autism by Genome‐Wide Association

    Association tests for samples in discovery stage. The top panel shows the Manhattan plot for Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) mother versus father test. The bottom panel shows the Manhattan plot for AGRE mother versus Illumina Genotype Control Database (iCon) female test. The two plots are aligned together by genomic coordinate (x-axis). The y-axis is the negative logarithm of the association P-value for each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Green dots indicate SNPs that are nominally significant (P < 0.05) in both tests. The most significant SNPs, rs2473147 and rs12431425, are pointed out by red arrows.

  • Two to Ten Years: Developmental Trajectories of Joint Attention in Children With ASD Who Received Targeted Social Communication Interventions

    Two to Ten Years: Developmental Trajectories of Joint Attention in Children With ASD Who Received Targeted Social Communication Interventions

    Overall trajectories of coordinated joint look, point, and show.

  • The Association Between Social Cognition and Executive Functioning and Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression in Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorders

    The Association Between Social Cognition and Executive Functioning and Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression in Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Hypothesized model of the relationship between executive functioning and social cognition with emotional symptoms. T1: Trail Making Task, T2: Card Sort Task, T3: Opposite Worlds, T4: Numbers Backwards, T5: Frith-Happé animations, T6: Strange Stories, T7: Eyes Task, T8: False Belief Composite, Q1: SDQ: Many worries, often seems worried, Q2: SDQ: Nervous or clingy in new situations, easily loses confidence, Q3: SDQ: Many fears, easily scared, Q4: PONS: worries, Q5: PONS: fears, Q6: SDQ: Often unhappy, down-hearted or tearful, Q7: PONS: low mood, Q8: PONS: Depressed thoughts, Q9: PONS: Labile mood; SDQ = Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire: PONS = Profile of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms.

  • Age-Related Changes in Conjunctive Visual Search in Children with and without ASD

    Age‐Related Changes in Conjunctive Visual Search in Children with and without ASD

    Illustration of events occurring on a target-present trial with a five-element display size.

  • Time Estimation Among Low-Functioning Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence of Poor Sensitivity to Variability of Short Durations

    Time Estimation Among Low‐Functioning Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence of Poor Sensitivity to Variability of Short Durations

    Mean proportion long responses for the temporal bisection task as a function of stimulus duration and group.

  • A Deletion Involving CD38 and BST1 Results in a Fusion Transcript in a Patient With Autism and Asthma

    A Deletion Involving CD38 and BST1 Results in a Fusion Transcript in a Patient With Autism and Asthma

    Molecular characterization of CD38 deletion. (A) Figure from UCSC genome browser showing the position of BST1 and CD38, predicted deletion breakpoints based on 1 M SNP data, position of qPCR assays used to validate the deletion, and position of long-range PCR primers used to determine the true breakpoint positions. There are no similar CNV listed in the Database of Genomic Variants v10 (February 2011). Region shown is chr4:15 320 000–15 430 000 (NCBI36/hg18 build). (B) Sanger sequencing of the long-range PCR product from the BST1-F primer spanned the deletion breakpoints and shows the true deletion coordinates to be chr4:15 332 700–15 415 153 (NCBI36/hg19). TCC microhomology was seen at each end of the deleted region. (C) Sequencing of a 201 bp RT-PCR product confirmed that the reading frame of the fusion transcript was maintained. Similar results were obtained using a second set of primers.

  • Altered Peripheral and Central Inflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Autism

    Altered Peripheral and Central Inflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Autism

    Mice prenatally exposed to valproic acid (VPA) show increased peripheral responses to an inflammatory stimulus. (A) Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal axis, but the amount of plasma corticosterone is higher in VPA600 mice. N = 4–5 per group. In the spleen, LPS increases the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and reduces the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1. All animals show increased levels of IL-1β (B), IL-6 (C), and TNF-α (D) upon LPS challenge. The increase of IL-6 was exacerbated in VPA-exposed mice. There was a general reduction in the levels of TGF-β1 after LPS challenge (E). N = 4–6 per group. Tukey's multiple comparison test: *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001 vs. the corresponding Sal group; #P < 0.05, ##P < 0.01, ###P < 0.001 vs. CON-LPS group; ++P < 0.01 vs. VPA400-LPS group. Mean ± SEM.

  • Investigation of Maternal Genotype Effects in Autism by Genome‐Wide Association
  • Two to Ten Years: Developmental Trajectories of Joint Attention in Children With ASD Who Received Targeted Social Communication Interventions
  • The Association Between Social Cognition and Executive Functioning and Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression in Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • Age‐Related Changes in Conjunctive Visual Search in Children with and without ASD
  • Time Estimation Among Low‐Functioning Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence of Poor Sensitivity to Variability of Short Durations
  • A Deletion Involving CD38 and BST1 Results in a Fusion Transcript in a Patient With Autism and Asthma
  • Altered Peripheral and Central Inflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Autism

Recently Published Issues

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*NEW* Treatment Research in ASD

Autism Treatment Research
Anthony Bailey
Editorial

Since the launch of Autism Research, there have been exciting advances in the genetics and neuroscience of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Concomitantly, there has been a significant increase in the number of well-designed and controlled treatment studies, reflecting both the development of new, more effective developmental and behavioral interverntions, as well as pressure for research that addresses the immediate needs of affected individuals. READ MORE...

Improvement in Social Deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorders Using a Theatre-Based, Peer-Mediated Intervention
Blythe A. Corbett, Deanna M. Swain, Catherine Coke, David Simon, Cassanda Newsom, Nea Houchins-Juarez, Ashley Jenson, Lily Wang, Yanna Song
Research Article

Social Emotional NeuroScience Endocrinology Theatre is a novel intervention program aimed at improving reciprocal social interaction in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) using behavioral strategies and theatrical techniques in a peer-mediated model. Previous research using a 3-month model sowed improvement in face perception, social interaction, and reductions in stress. The current study assessed a 2-week summer camp model. Typically developing peers were trained and paired with ASD youth (8-17 years). READ MORE...

Recently Published Articles

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IMFAR 2014

IMFAR 2014

Autism Awareness Month: Special Virtual Issue

Free for a Short Period of Time!

World Autism Awareness Day was originally held in September 1989, but moved to its current date of April 2nd after a United Nations General Assembly motion in 2007. The purpose of the day was to raise awareness of an “invisible” disability. Thankfully awareness of Autism and related disorders has increased dramatically over the last 25 years, in part because of improved diagnosis, in part because of energetic advocacy by parent-led organisations and in part because of the remarkable increase in high quality research.

Autism Research was conceived in order to publish in one place research from the increasing number of areas contributing to our scientific knowledge of ASDs. To celebrate World Autism Awareness Day in 2014, we are publishing a virtual issue containing some of the most popular original articles and reviews from Autism Research. The breadth and quality of these articles highlights the vitality of the field.

To read this special Virtual Issue free for a limited time, click here.

Autism Research Scientific Summaries for Families with ASD

Read More...

Improvement in Social Deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorders Using a Theatre-Based, Peer-Mediated Intervention
Blythe Corbett, Deanna Swain, Catherine Coke, David Simon, Cassadra Newsom, Nea Houchins-Juarez, Ashley Jenson,Lily Wang, Yanna Song

Scientific Summary for Families with ASD
SENSE Theatre is a novel intervention program aimed at improving social interaction in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) using behavioral and theatrical techniques. Previous research using a 3-month model showed improvement in face perception, social interaction, and reductions in stress. The current study assessed a 2-week summer camp model. Typically developing peers were trained and paired with 8-to-17-year-old youth with ASD. Read More...

Autonomic Responses to Social and Non-Social Pictures in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Annke Louwerse, Joke Tulen, Jost van der Geest, Jan van der Ende, Frank Verhulst, Kirstin Greaves-Lord

Scientific Summary for Families with ASD
Individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) tend to respond differently to other people. They look less at faces and seem to avoid eye contact with others. It remains unclear why individuals with ASD show atypical behaviour during social interactions. A possible explanation is that individuals with ASD experience higher levels of autonomic activity (e.g. increased heart rate or increased transpiration) in response to other people. This study investigated these autonomic responses and the subjective experiences of individuals with ASD and controls when they looked at pictures with and without a social content (i.e. with and without humans depicted on the pictures). Read More...

Do Children with Autism Re-enact Object Movements Rather than Imitate Demonstrator Actions?
Jennifer Mayer, Deborah Custance, Emmelianna Bujak, Elisabeth Hill, Pamela Heaton

Scientific Summary for Families with ASD
Children with autism often exhibit imitative deficits. Since imitation is a quintessentially social activity, it is unsurprising that research suggests that children with autism rarely spontaneously imitate the actions of others. Interestingly, it has been suggested that autism-specific deficits in imitation may be reduced or spared in the context of copying actions on or with objects. However, most previous research has not sufficiently distinguished learning about object movements from learning about the topography of demonstrated actions. 20 children with autism and 20 typically developing children were presented with six sets of puzzle objects.Read More...

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