Autism Research

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 4

Edited By: David G. Amaral, Ph.D

Impact Factor: 4.33

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 3/68 (Psychology Developmental); 6/51 (Behavioral Sciences)

Online ISSN: 1939-3806

Featured

  • Prosody Recognition in Adults With High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders: From Psychoacoustics to Cognition

    Prosody Recognition in Adults With High‐Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders: From Psychoacoustics to Cognition

    Histogram of votes (8/20) for selected stimuli. A histogram illustrating the votes of the judges (20 altogether) for the stimuli that were selected for the final task. Seventy-seven percent of the stimuli received 14–18 votes each. Stimuli that received a lesser amount of votes were also included in order to increase the difficulty of the task.

  • The Relationship Between Stress and Social Functioning in Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Without Intellectual Disability

    The Relationship Between Stress and Social Functioning in Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Without Intellectual Disability

    Stress in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and healthy volunteers. SE, standard error.

  • Fronto-Temporal Connectivity is Preserved During Sung but Not Spoken Word Listening, Across the Autism Spectrum

    Fronto‐Temporal Connectivity is Preserved During Sung but Not Spoken Word Listening, Across the Autism Spectrum

    Spoken vs. sung-word perception. The top panel shows axial brain sections (z = 0) with activations for spoken–sung comparisons at P < 0.05, FWE-corrected at cluster level. The TYP group shows an activated cluster in the left angular gyrus, while there were no significant clusters for the ASD group. The bottom panel shows the reverse contrast, sung–spoken at the same statistical threshold, where both groups, ASD and TYP, demonstrate activation of robust and extensive bilateral temporal clusters. The scale bar represents T-values.

  • Atypical Hemispheric Specialization for Faces in Infants at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Atypical Hemispheric Specialization for Faces in Infants at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    (A) Intra-hemispheric anterior-posterior gamma band (30–50 Hz) coherence for left and right hemispheres at 6 (left panel) and 12 months (right panel) for high- and low-risk infants. Error bars represent one standard error of the mean. (B) Lateralization index for intra-hemispheric coherence across 6 and 12 month olds. Positive values are indicative of rightward lateralization; negative values indicative of leftward lateralization. Error bars represent one standard error of the mean. Infants at high-risk for ASD, HRA; low-risk comparison infants, LRC; left hemisphere, LH; right hemisphere, RH. * P < 0.01

  • Family Quality of Life and ASD: The Role of Child Adaptive Functioning and Behavior Problems

    Family Quality of Life and ASD: The Role of Child Adaptive Functioning and Behavior Problems

    FQOL domain satisfaction ratings across daily living skill level.

  • Learning Language in Autism: Maternal Linguistic Input Contributes to Later Vocabulary

    Learning Language in Autism: Maternal Linguistic Input Contributes to Later Vocabulary

    Depicts the raw data observed for each dyad: maternal input mean length of utterances (MLU) and the respective child's T3 % of words spoken on the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (MCDI). Regression lines depict the simple slopes for each diagnostic group calculated from the final regression model (step 4), which holds all other predictors at their mean value. This figure demonstrates a positive linear relationship between input MLU and children's T3 productive vocabulary, which did not differ significantly between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typical development (TYP) groups.

  • Consanguinity in India and Its Association With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Consanguinity in India and Its Association With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Types of consanguinity in Indian Population. (A,B) parallel first cousins; (C) cross first cousins; (D) uncle-niece; (E) double first cousins; (F) second cousins.

  • Prosody Recognition in Adults With High‐Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders: From Psychoacoustics to Cognition
  • The Relationship Between Stress and Social Functioning in Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Without Intellectual Disability
  • Fronto‐Temporal Connectivity is Preserved During Sung but Not Spoken Word Listening, Across the Autism Spectrum
  • Atypical Hemispheric Specialization for Faces in Infants at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Family Quality of Life and ASD: The Role of Child Adaptive Functioning and Behavior Problems
  • Learning Language in Autism: Maternal Linguistic Input Contributes to Later Vocabulary
  • Consanguinity in India and Its Association With Autism Spectrum Disorder

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Since the launch of Autism Research, there have been exciting advances in the genetics and neuroscience of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Concomitantly, there has been a significant increase in the number of well-designed and controlled treatment studies, reflecting both the development of new, more effective developmental and behavioral interverntions, as well as pressure for research that addresses the immediate needs of affected individuals. READ MORE...

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Journal News

Improved AUR Turnaround Times:

26 Days to Final Decision as of April 1st 2015

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New Editor-in-Chief and restructuring of the editorial board!

Autism Research welcomes its new Editor-in-Chief and new Associate Editors. Associate Editors will now be responsible for coordinating the peer review process of articles for various sections of the journal. The journal will expand its coverage to all areas of modern research on autism spectrum and related disorders. The new organizational structure will increase the speed to the first decision and will insure the fair review of papers related to all areas of autism research. The new editorial staff will also increase the number of review papers published by the journal to aid in the education of the INSAR membership. Beginning in January of 2015, Autism Research is published online only.

Editor-in-Chief:
David G. Amaral, Ph.D.
UC Davis MIND Institute

Associate Editors:
Evdokia Anagnostou, MD
Bloorview Research Institute (Treatment - including clinical trials)

Peter Mundy, Ph.D.

UC Davis MIND Institute (Psychology/Cognitive Neuroscience)

Ralph-Axel Müller, Ph.D.
San Diego State University (Neuroimaging/Neuropathology)

Craig J. Newschaffer, Ph.D.
A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University (Environmental Factors - Epidemiology, Immunology)

James S. Sutcliffe, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University (Omics)

Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele
, MD
Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute (Model Systems - animal, cellular and computational)

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