Water Resources Research

Cover image for Water Resources Research

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Impact Factor: 3.549

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 2/20 (Limnology); 3/83 (Water Resources); 29/221 (Environmental Sciences)

Online ISSN: 1944-7973

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  1. 1 - 45
  1. Research Articles

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      The change of nature and the nature of change in agricultural landscapes: Hydrologic regime shifts modulate ecological transitions

      Efi Foufoula-Georgiou, Zeinab Takbiri, Jonathan A. Czuba and Jon Schwenk

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017637

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      Key Points:

      • Subsurface agricultural drainage alters hydrologic response
      • Climate filtered through engineered landscapes linearizes streamflow dynamics
      • Amplified hydrology modulates ecological transitions
    2. Predicting permeability from the characteristic relaxation time and intrinsic formation factor of complex conductivity spectra

      A. Revil, A. Binley, L. Mejus and P. Kessouri

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017074

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      Key Points:

      • Permeability is related to a relaxation time and the formation factor
      • Time constant and formation factor are obtained from induced polarization
      • The relationship is tested against a broad database of experimental data
    3. Evaluating the relationship between topography and groundwater using outputs from a continental-scale integrated hydrology model

      Laura E. Condon and Reed M. Maxwell

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016774

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      Key Points:

      • Relationships between water table depth and topography are spatially variable
      • Groundwater follows topography in flat humid regions with low conductivity
      • Integrated models can evaluate groundwater behavior in large complex systems
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      Complexity and organization in hydrology: A personal view

      Rafael L. Bras

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016958

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      Key Points:

      • Examples of complexity and organization of hydrologic processes
      • Work by the author and colleagues over the last 25 years
      • Covers advances in the study of land-atmosphere interactions and geomorphology
  2. Review Articles

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      The science and practice of river restoration

      Ellen Wohl, Stuart N. Lane and Andrew C. Wilcox

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016874

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      Key Points

      • River restoration is a prominent area of applied water-resources science
      • restoration includes connectivity, physical-biotic interactions, and history
      • effective restoration requires collaboration among scientists and practitioners
  3. Research Articles

    1. Hierarchical Bayesian clustering for nonstationary flood frequency analysis: Application to trends of annual maximum flow in Germany

      Xun Sun, Upmanu Lall, Bruno Merz and Nguyen Viet Dung

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017117

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      Key Points

      • Develop a nonstationary frequency analysis approach for large area data sets
      • Investigate the trends in annual maximum daily stream flow over Germany
    2. In situ determination of surface relaxivities for unconsolidated sediments

      Markus Duschl, Petrik Galvosas, Timothy I. Brox, Andreas Pohlmeier and Harry Vereecken

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016574

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      Key Points:

      • Surface relaxivity serves as calibration parameter for NMR relaxation measurements
      • Pore surface measurement method affects the surface relaxivity determination
      • NMR diffusion experiments lead to best calibration results
    3. A well-balanced FV scheme for compound channels with complex geometry and movable bed

      L. Minatti

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016584

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      Key Points:

      • The scheme handles the complex geometry variations of natural channels
      • Modeling of channels with fixed overbanks and movable main channel
      • Applications to natural channels
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      Stochastic modeling of solute transport in aquifers: From heterogeneity characterization to risk analysis

      A. Fiori, A. Bellin, V. Cvetkovic, F. P. J. de Barros and G. Dagan

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017388

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      Key Points

      • Recent advances in Lagrangian stochastic methods for groundwater transport
      • Systematic presentation of results from theory to applications
      • Unified framework in stochastic hydrogeology and health risk analysis
    5. Quantifying the impacts of climate change and ecological restoration on streamflow changes based on a Budyko hydrological model in China's Loess Plateau

      Wei Liang, Dan Bai, Feiyu Wang, Bojie Fu, Junping Yan, Shuai Wang, Yuting Yang, Di Long and Minquan Feng

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016589

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      Key Points:

      • Annual streamflow exhibited a decreasing trend in all catchments
      • Ecological restoration is the primary reason for streamflow reduction
      • Slope measures gradually weakened the impact of channel measures on streamflow
    6. Water balance-based actual evapotranspiration reconstruction from ground and satellite observations over the conterminous United States

      Zhanming Wan, Ke Zhang, Xianwu Xue, Zhen Hong, Yang Hong and Jonathan J. Gourley

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017311

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      Key Points:

      • Applied land surface models to disaggregate GRACE data
      • Developed water balance-based approach to estimate ET
      • Produced a high quality observational-based ET record
  4. Review Articles

    1. Whither field hydrology? The need for discovery science and outrageous hydrological hypotheses

      T. P. Burt and J. J. McDonnell

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016839

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      Key Points:

      • Reviews benchmark WRR on runoff generation
      • Discusses the current lack of field work in hydrology
      • Review is context for a vision for the future
  5. Research Articles

    1. Impact of prescribed burning on blanket peat hydrology

      Joseph Holden, Sheila M. Palmer, Kerrylyn Johnston, Catherine Wearing, Brian Irvine and Lee E. Brown

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016782

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      Key Points:

      • Prescribed vegetation burning causes deeper water tables in blanket peat
      • Time since burn is an important factor influencing water table dynamics
      • Peatland river flow response to rainfall is affected by prescribed vegetation burning
    2. Effective parameterizations of three nonwetting phase relative permeability models

      Zhenlei Yang and Binayak P. Mohanty

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016190

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      Key Points:

      • A generalized nonwetting phase relative permeability expression with Kosugi WRF
      • Optimum tortuosity-connectivity parameter for three relative permeability models
      • Improved prediction with three modified relative permeability models
  6. Review Articles

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      Improving the representation of hydrologic processes in Earth System Models

      Martyn P. Clark, Ying Fan, David M. Lawrence, Jennifer C. Adam, Diogo Bolster, David J. Gochis, Richard P. Hooper, Mukesh Kumar, L. Ruby Leung, D. Scott Mackay, Reed M. Maxwell, Chaopeng Shen, Sean C. Swenson and Xubin Zeng

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017096

      Key Points:

      • Land model development can benefit from recent advances in hydrology
      • Accelerating modeling advances requires comprehensive benchmarking activities
      • Stronger collaboration is needed between the hydrology and ESM modeling communities
    2. A review of surrogate models and their application to groundwater modeling

      M. J. Asher, B. F. W. Croke, A. J. Jakeman and L. J. M. Peeters

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016967

      Key Points:

      • Three broad categories of surrogate model exist, each with their shortfalls
      • Most methods common in water resources aren't applicable for large numbers of parameters
      • A number of promising methods have not been applied to water resources models
  7. Research Articles

    1. A model of the socio-hydrologic dynamics in a semiarid catchment: Isolating feedbacks in the coupled human-hydrology system

      Y. Elshafei, J. Z. Coletti, M. Sivapalan and M. R. Hipsey

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017048

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      Key Points:

      • Coupled socio-hydrologic dynamics are quantified over the course of a century
      • Threshold behavior is observed in human system feedback due to land use change
      • Community sensitivity state variable captures drivers of human response
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      Charting unknown waters—On the role of surprise in flood risk assessment and management

      B. Merz, S. Vorogushyn, U. Lall, A. Viglione and G. Blöschl

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017464

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      Key Points:

      • Surprise is a neglected element in flood risk assessment and management
      • Limits of predictability and cognitive biases need closer attention
      • Approaches for reducing surprise and its malicious consequences are discussed
    3. Computationally inexpensive identification of noninformative model parameters by sequential screening

      Matthias Cuntz, Juliane Mai, Matthias Zink, Stephan Thober, Rohini Kumar, David Schäfer, Martin Schrön, John Craven, Oldrich Rakovec, Diana Spieler, Vladyslav Prykhodko, Giovanni Dalmasso, Jude Musuuza, Ben Langenberg, Sabine Attinger and Luis Samaniego

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016907

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      Key Points:

      • Developed fully automated sequential screening method
      • Saves up to 70% of model evaluations in subsequent model diagnostics
      • Demonstrated for hydrologic model in three hydrologically unique catchments
  8. Review Articles

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      Integrating social and physical sciences in water management

      Jay R. Lund

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017125

      Key Points

      • Integration of social and physical sciences is essential to water management
      • Many successes of integrating social and physical sciences can be identified
      • Lessons can be learned from this experience
  9. Technical Reports: Methods

    1. Imbibition of hydraulic fracturing fluids into partially saturated shale

      Daniel T. Birdsell, Harihar Rajaram and Greg Lackey

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017621

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      Key Points

      • Fracturing fluid imbibition into shale is calculated from multiphase flow theory
      • Nondimensional imbibition rate parameter is derived
      • Imbibition most sensitive to permeability and viscosity but less to saturation
  10. Research Articles

    1. Scenario tree reduction in stochastic programming with recourse for hydropower operations

      Bin Xu, Ping-An Zhong, Renato C. Zambon, Yunfa Zhao and William W.-G. Yeh

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016828

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      Key Points:

      • Developed a stochastic programming with recourse model hydropower production
      • Performed in-sample and out-sample tests to evaluate scenario reduction impact
      • Evaluated the tradeoff between computational demand and scenario reduction level
    2. Reliability, return periods, and risk under nonstationarity

      Laura K. Read and Richard M. Vogel

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017089

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      Key Points:

      • Comprehensive analysis of return period and reliability under nonstationarity
      • Trends change the shape of the distribution of the return period
      • Reliability over project life is a sensible design metric under nonstationarity
  11. Editorial

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      Appreciation of peer reviewers for 2014

      Alberto Montanari, Jean Bahr, Günter Blöschl, Ximing Cai, D. Scott Mackay, Anna Michalak, Harihar Rajaram and Graham Sander

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017828

  12. Research Articles

    1. Modeling mixed retention and early arrivals in multidimensional heterogeneous media using an explicit Lagrangian scheme

      Yong Zhang, Mark M. Meerschaert, Boris Baeumer and Eric M. LaBolle

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016902

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      Key Points:

      • The multirate mass transfer model combines subordination to streamlines
      • Fractional advection-dispersion equation to capture retention and early arrivals
      • Lagrangian solvers for multirate mass transfer with different memory functions
    2. Untangling the effects of shallow groundwater and soil texture as drivers of subfield-scale yield variability

      Samuel C. Zipper, Mehmet Evren Soylu, Eric G. Booth and Steven P. Loheide II

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017522

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      Key Points:

      • Water table depth (WTD), soil texture, and weather control corn yield
      • Benefits of shallow WTD (drought resistance) outweigh costs (oxygen stress)
      • Soil sets static baseline on which dynamic WTD and weather control yield
    3. Abiotic control of underwater light in a drinking water reservoir: Photon budget analysis and implications for water quality monitoring

      Shohei Watanabe, Isabelle Laurion, Stiig Markager and Warwick F. Vincent

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015617

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      Key Points:

      • A photon budget approach was used to analyze underwater light in a reservoir
      • Transparency was controlled by dissolved organic matter not by phytoplankton
      • This limits application of traditional water quality descriptors (Secchi depth)
    4. Johnson SB as general functional form for raindrop size distribution

      Katia Cugerone and Carlo De Michele

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016484

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      Key Points:

      • For the first time, the Johnson SB distribution is proposed for the statistical description of DSDs
      • Large disdrometric data sets are analyzed to compare the fit of Johnson SB, Gamma and Lognormal distributions
      • Skewness-kurtosis plane, AIC-BIC indices and K-S goodness-of-fit test have been used
    5. A space and time scale-dependent nonlinear geostatistical approach for downscaling daily precipitation and temperature

      Sanjeev Kumar Jha, Gregoire Mariethoz, Jason Evans, Matthew F. McCabe and Ashish Sharma

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016729

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      Key Points:

      • A geostatistical approach to downscaling climate model data is presented
      • Downscaled precipitation and temperature reproduce properties of the reference
      • A variety of statistical indicators confirm the good performance of the method
    6. Surface water types and sediment distribution patterns at the confluence of mega rivers: The Solimões-Amazon and Negro Rivers junction

      Edward Park and Edgardo M. Latrubesse

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016757

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      Key Points:

      • Surface water types show higher seasonal and lower interannual variations
      • Branches display relatively low spatiotemporal surface water variations
      • Anabranching planform helps preventing surface water mixing
    7. Continental U.S. streamflow trends from 1940 to 2009 and their relationships with watershed spatial characteristics

      Joshua S. Rice, Ryan E. Emanuel, James M. Vose and Stacy A. C. Nelson

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016367

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      Key Points:

      • Numerous trends in streamflow occur in the continental U.S. from 1940 to 2009
      • Trend magnitudes are smaller in reference basin than nonreference basins
      • Relationships between watershed characteristics and regional trends are examined
    8. Four-dimensional electrical conductivity monitoring of stage-driven river water intrusion: Accounting for water table effects using a transient mesh boundary and conditional inversion constraints

      Tim Johnson, Roelof Versteeg, Jon Thomle, Glenn Hammond, Xingyuan Chen and John Zachara

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016129

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      Key Points:

      • An adaptive mesh inversion is developed to accommodate the transient water table boundary
      • Conditional constraints are developed to inform the inversion of known transient conditions
      • New transient constraints enable 4-D imaging of stage-driven groundwater/surface water interaction
    9. Reintroducing radiometric surface temperature into the Penman-Monteith formulation

      Kaniska Mallick, Eva Boegh, Ivonne Trebs, Joseph G. Alfieri, William P. Kustas, John H. Prueger, Dev Niyogi, Narendra Das, Darren T. Drewry, Lucien Hoffmann and Andrew J. Jarvis

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016106

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      Key Points:

      • Reintroducing radiometric surface temperature into Penman-Monteith (PM) model
      • Holistic surface moisture availability framework to constrain the PM equation
      • Numerical estimation of Priestley-Taylor parameter
  13. Technical Reports: Methods

    1. FINIFLUX: An implicit finite element model for quantification of groundwater fluxes and hyporheic exchange in streams and rivers using radon

      S. Frei and B. S. Gilfedder

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017212

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      Key Points:

      • Modeling surface/groundwater exchange using Rn as a tracer
      • Open source model to quantify groundwater inflow and hyporheic exchange using Rn field data
      • Model tested with data obtained from Rn field surveys
  14. Research Articles

    1. Well integrity assessment under temperature and pressure stresses by a 1:1 scale wellbore experiment

      J. C. Manceau, J. Tremosa, P. Audigane, C. Lerouge, F. Claret, Y. Lettry, T. Fierz and C. Nussbaum

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016786

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      Key Points:

      • A new experiment is presented for well integrity assessment
      • The effect of pressure and temperature stresses on well integrity is evaluated
      • The observations are explained and discussed with flow and geochemical modeling
    2. Interdependence of chronic hydraulic dysfunction and canopy processes can improve integrated models of tree response to drought

      D. Scott Mackay, David E. Roberts, Brent E. Ewers, John S. Sperry, Nathan G. McDowell and William T. Pockman

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017244

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      Key Points:

      • Stomatal conductance is modeled using physical equations with xylem cavitation
      • Simulation of drought transpiration and leaf water potential was improved
      • Transient response to cavitation helps to explain optimal hydraulic traits
    3. You have free access to this content
      The future of water resources systems analysis: Toward a scientific framework for sustainable water management

      Casey M. Brown, Jay R. Lund, Ximing Cai, Patrick M. Reed, Edith A. Zagona, Avi Ostfeld, Jim Hall, Gregory W. Characklis, Winston Yu and Levi Brekke

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017114

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      Key Points:

      • WRSA evolved from a prescriptive science to science of water resources systems
      • WRSA has long focused on the water-related variables that are important to society
      • WRSA should adopt a scientific initiative based on the prediction of water resources variables
  15. Review Articles

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      Persistent questions of heterogeneity, uncertainty, and scale in subsurface flow and transport

      Peter K. Kitanidis

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017639

      Key Points:

      • Significant progress since 1965, stimulated by shift in emphasis and new technologies
      • Despite progress, ingrained ideas hamper the adoption of research results in applications
      • A paradigm shift regarding the concepts of information and scale is called for
  16. Research Articles

    1. A novel equation for determining the suction stress of unsaturated soils from the water retention curve based on wetted surface area in pores

      Roberto Greco and Rudy Gargano

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016541

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      Key Points:

      • A novel equation for soil suction stress is proposed
      • The proposed equation fits experiments better than other used equations
      • The proposed equation allows to calculate effective stress of unsaturated soils
    2. You have free access to this content
      On the use of rhodamine WT for the characterization of stream hydrodynamics and transient storage

      Robert L. Runkel

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017201

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      Key Points:

      • Rhodamine WT is not a conservative tracer due to sorption onto solid surfaces
      • Rhodamine WT should not be used to quantify hyporheic zone processes
      • Qualitative use of rhodamine WT may be justified in large systems
    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Multimodel analysis of anisotropic diffusive tracer-gas transport in a deep arid unsaturated zone

      Christopher T. Green, Michelle A. Walvoord, Brian J. Andraski, Robert G. Striegl and David A. Stonestrom

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016055

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      Key Points:

      • A deep UZ gas tracer test is modeled with varying diffusivity structures
      • The most probable model has an anisotropic bulk-scale diffusivity structure
      • Analytical and numerical models show high lateral diffusivity, as do observations
    4. The relative stability of salmon redds and unspawned streambeds

      Todd H. Buxton, John M. Buffington, Elowyn M. Yager, Marwan A. Hassan and Alexander K. Fremier

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016908

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      Key Points:

      • Spawning loosens streambeds and decrease forces required for grain movement
      • Boundary shear stress is elevated on redd topography relative to planar beds
      • Presence of salmon nests increases bed load transport in streams
    5. Using in situ vertical displacements to characterize changes in moisture load

      Lawrence C. Murdoch, Clay E. Freeman, Leonid N. Germanovich, Colby Thrash and Scott DeWolf

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017335

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      Key Points:

      • Small displacements caused by changes in moisture can be measured at depth
      • The method was validated by comparing data from two instruments to hydro-data
      • The method samples a region ∼2× the depth of the sensor, hundreds of m2 or more
    6. Climatic and landscape controls on water transit times and silicate mineral weathering in the critical zone

      Xavier Zapata-Rios, Jennifer McIntosh, Laura Rademacher, Peter A. Troch, Paul D. Brooks, Craig Rasmussen and Jon Chorover

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017018

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      Key Points:

      • We quantified Effective Energy and Mass Transfer (EEMT) to the critical zone
      • EEMT is tested as a controlling factor on water age and weathering from springs
      • EEMT strongly correlates with water age and solutes from spring waters
    7. Discharge and water-depth estimates for ungauged rivers: Combining hydrologic, hydraulic, and inverse modeling with stage and water-area measurements from satellites

      Ganming Liu, Franklin W. Schwartz, Kuo-Hsin Tseng and C. K. Shum

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016971

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      Key Points:

      • Developed an approach to estimating discharge and water depth for ungauged rivers
      • Simulated river discharge and water depth for the Red River of the North basin
      • Calibrated SWAT model with remotely sensed data

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