Water Resources Research

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 6

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Impact Factor: 3.149

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2012: 2/20 (Limnology); 3/80 (Water Resources); 35/210 (Environmental Sciences)

Online ISSN: 1944-7973

VIEW

  1. 1 - 42
  1. REPLY

  2. Comments

  3. Research Articles

    1. Interplay of climate seasonality and soil moisture-rainfall feedback

      Jun Yin, Amilcare Porporato and John Albertson

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014772

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Stochastic soil moisture-rainfall feedback model and the role of seasonality
      • Soil moisture distribution may exhibit bimodal behavior at the start of the warm season
      • The results corroborate the hypothesis of soil moisture-rainfall feedback
    2. Soil moisture and soil properties estimation in the Community Land Model with synthetic brightness temperature observations

      Xujun Han, Harrie-Jan Hendricks Franssen, Carsten Montzka and Harry Vereecken

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014586

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Assimilation with biased soil properties can worsen surface fluxes characterization
      • Spatial distribution of model states and soil properties can be updated
      • Joint assimilation works better for a coupled land surface and microwave model
    3. Topographic controls on shallow groundwater levels in a steep, prealpine catchment: When are the TWI assumptions valid?

      M. Rinderer, H. J. van Meerveld and J. Seibert

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR015009

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Median groundwater levels were correlated to topographic indices
      • Correlation between groundwater levels and topographic indices varied over time
      • TWI assumptions were most valid during wet conditions, after peak flows
    4. A robust multimodel framework for ensemble seasonal hydroclimatic forecasts

      Pablo A. Mendoza, Balaji Rajagopalan, Martyn P. Clark, Gonzalo Cortés and James McPhee

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015426

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Multimodel ensemble forecasting systems involve several methodological choices
      • A robust framework for decision-making is provided
      • The utility of this approach is demonstrated for seasonal streamflow forecasts
    5. Spatial characterization of roughness elements in high-gradient channels of the Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado, USA

      Steven E. Yochum, Brian P. Bledsoe, Ellen Wohl and Gabrielle C. L. David

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015587

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Random field approach is utilized for assessing elevation and depth variability
      • Bed elevation standard deviation and depth skew effectiveness for predicting f
      • Skew and kurtosis are valuable for quantifying the spectrum of channel types
    6. Modeling water demand when households have multiple sources of water

      Lassina Coulibaly, Paul M. Jakus and John E. Keith

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR015090

      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Few studies examine water demand when there are multiple sources of water
      • Demand for piped water is more elastic as more alternatives become available
      • Public water utilities may be more price constrained than previously thought
    7. How will increases in rainfall intensity affect semiarid ecosystems?

      Koen Siteur, Maarten B. Eppinga, Derek Karssenberg, Mara Baudena, Marc F.P. Bierkens and Max Rietkerk

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014955

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Rainfall intensity controls patterning and the resilience of arid ecosystems
      • Both an increase and decrease in rainfall intensity can trigger desertification
      • In line with observations, three types of rain events were identified in our model
    8. A multimodel regression-sampling algorithm for generating rich monthly streamflow scenarios

      Chao Li and Vijay P. Singh

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR013969

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A multimodel framework for streamflow simulation
      • Generates rich streamflow scenarios
      • Preserves complex distributional properties
    9. Analytical solutions for flow in porous media with multicomponent cation exchange reactions

      Ashwin Venkatraman, Marc A. Hesse, Larry W. Lake and Russell T. Johns

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR015091

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Analytical model for cation exchange reactions (Na, Mg, and Ca) with transport
      • Composition space analysis for intermediate compositions and effluent profiles
      • Ternary cation exchange transport model matches laboratory and field measurements
    10. Derivation of lowland riparian wetland deposit architecture using geophysical image analysis and interface detection

      J. E. Chambers, P. B. Wilkinson, S. Uhlemann, J. P. R. Sorensen, C. Roberts, A. J. Newell, W. O. C. Ward, A. Binley, P. J. Williams, D. C. Gooddy, G. Old and L. Bai

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015643

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Subsurface wetland architecture is characterized using 3-D resistivity imaging
      • Edge detectors for resistivity image analysis are compared
      • Resistivity models illuminate structures relevant to hydrological functioning
    11. A simple and effective method for quantifying spatial anisotropy of time series of precipitation fields

      Tero J. Niemi, Teemu Kokkonen and Alan W. Seed

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR015190

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Method to quantify the anisotropy of precipitation fields is proposed
      • Method is suitable for a time series of fields
      • Good performance is achieved with both generated and measured rain fields
    12. Modeling intersite dependence for regional frequency analysis of extreme marine events

      Jérôme Weiss, Pietro Bernardara and Michel Benoit

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015391

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Intersite dependence for regional frequency analysis (pooling method)
      • Model describing both the storm propagation in the region and the storm intensity
      • Assessment of the regional effective duration and the return periods of storms
    13. Water resources of the Black Sea Basin at high spatial and temporal resolution

      Elham Rouholahnejad, Karim C. Abbaspour, Raghvan Srinivasan, Victor Bacu and Anthony Lehmann

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014132

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A high-resolution hydrological model of the Black Sea Basin is built
      • We included river discharge, crop yield, and nitrate load in calibration
      • Blue and green water resources of the Basin are calculated at subbasin level
    14. Systematic assessment of the uncertainty in integrated surface water-groundwater modeling based on the probabilistic collocation method

      Bin Wu, Yi Zheng, Yong Tian, Xin Wu, Yingying Yao, Feng Han, Jie Liu and Chunmiao Zheng

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015366

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Systematic uncertainty analysis for integrated surface water-groundwater models
      • A holistic view of the modeling uncertainty achieved with a low computing cost
      • Insights into process understanding, model calibration, and data collection
    15. Integrated mathematical modeling of hydrological and hydrodynamic response to rainfall events in rural lowland catchments

      D. P. Viero, P. Peruzzo, L. Carniello and A. Defina

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014293

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A process-based, coupled surface-subsurface, 2-D mathematical model is presented
      • The model effectively integrates the main hydrologic and hydraulic processes
      • The model can be applied to storm events in rural lowland catchments
    16. The delivery of dissolved organic carbon from a forested hillslope to a headwater stream in southeastern Pennsylvania, USA

      Yi Mei, George M. Hornberger, Louis A. Kaplan, J. Denis Newbold and Anthony K. Aufdenkampe

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015635

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A finite element model was developed for DOC
      • Our model successfully reveals the DOC flushing processes during storms
      • Key factors controlling the discharge concentration relationship were identified
    17. Coping with model error in variational data assimilation using optimal mass transport

      Lipeng Ning, Francesca P. Carli, Ardeshir Mohammad Ebtehaj, Efi Foufoula-Georgiou and Tryphon T. Georgiou

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014966

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • We introduce a method to handle model uncertainty in data assimilation
      • Optimal mass transport is used to quantify mismatch between forecast and states
      • The promise of our method is demonstrated in advection-diffusion dynamics
    18. On the upscaling of chemical transport in fractured rock

      Vladimir Cvetkovic and Hrvoje Gotovac

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015505

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Probabilistic interpretation of flow-dependent specific surface area for rocks
      • Upscaling of reactive transport in rock
      • Bounds for flow-dependent specific surface area
    19. Effects of heterogeneous soil-water diffusivity on vegetation pattern formation

      H. Yizhaq, S. Sela, T. Svoray, S. Assouline and G. Bel

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015362

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Modeling the effects of heterogeneous soil-water diffusivity
      • Heterogeneity increases vegetation durability
      • Vegetation pattern changes from self-organized to imposed due to heterogeneity
    20. Solute transport in aquifers of arbitrary variability: A time-domain random walk formulation

      Vladimir Cvetkovic, Aldo Fiori and Gedeon Dagan

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015449

      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Simple tool for solute transport in 3-D aquifers of arbitrary variability
      • Origin of non-Fickian transport by higher-order temporal moments
      • Conceptual clarification on relationship between TDRW and CTRW approaches
    21. Electrical-hydraulic relationships observed for unconsolidated sediments in the presence of a cobble framework

      Lee Slater, Warren Barrash, Jeanette Montrey and Andrew Binley

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014631

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points:

      • The cobble framework complicates interpretation of K from SIP
      • Discounting the cobble framework improves SIP estimation of K
      • Such discounting also improves estimation of imaginary conductivity
    22. Modeling biofilm dynamics and hydraulic properties in variably saturated soils using a channel network model

      Ravid Rosenzweig, Alex Furman, Carlos Dosoretz and Uri Shavit

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR015211

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • A pore network was used to simulate coupled water flow and biofilm dynamics
      • Mass transfer at the water-biofilm interface controls biofilm dynamics
      • High mass transfer coefficient leads to severe clogging
    23. Global-scale assessment of groundwater depletion and related groundwater abstractions: Combining hydrological modeling with information from well observations and GRACE satellites

      Petra Döll, Hannes Müller Schmied, Carina Schuh, Felix T. Portmann and Annette Eicker

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015595

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Groundwater depletion is simulated by a global model
      • Seventy percent deficit irrigation is likely in groundwater depletion areas
      • About 15% of global groundwater abstractions are from nonrenewable sources
    24. Rescuing degrading aquifers in the Central Coastal Plain of North Carolina (USA): Just process, effective groundwater management policy, and sustainable aquifers

      Alex K. Manda and Wendy A. Klein

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR015242

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Incorporate social psychological and socio-legal concepts into policy process
      • Groundwater management process as an example for coastal communities
      • Acceptable policy results in groundwater recovery and sustainability
    25. Patterns of similarity of seasonal water balances: A window into streamflow variability over a range of time scales

      Wouter R. Berghuijs, Murugesu Sivapalan, Ross A. Woods and Hubert H. G. Savenije

      Article first published online: 9 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015692

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Framework for the seasonal water balance is developed based on climatic controls
      • The 321 catchments are grouped into 10 clusters with similar seasonal water balances
      • The seasonal water balance has an imprint both on streamflow and landscape
    26. Snowpack regimes of the Western United States

      Ernesto Trujillo and Noah P. Molotch

      Article first published online: 9 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014753

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • No proportionality in the SWE curve is inferred in the Western United States
      • Relationships between SWE metrics highlight the natural snowpack patterns
      • SWE metrics offer basis for comparison of current and future snowpack dynamics
    27. A diameter-sensitive flow entropy method for reliability consideration in water distribution system design

      Haixing Liu, Dragan Savić, Zoran Kapelan, Ming Zhao, Yixing Yuan and Hongbin Zhao

      Article first published online: 9 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014882

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Novel entropy as a surrogate measure for reliability assessment
      • Uncertainty inclusion in reliability assessment framework of water networks
      • Correlation analysis between entropy and reliability
    28. Cholera in the Lake Kivu region (DRC): Integrating remote sensing and spatially explicit epidemiological modeling

      Flavio Finger, Allyn Knox, Enrico Bertuzzo, Lorenzo Mari, Didier Bompangue, Marino Gatto, Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe and Andrea Rinaldo

      Article first published online: 9 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015521

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Markov chain model of cholera dynamics in the Lake Kivu area (DRC)
      • Global climate anomalies are the main drivers, together with rainfall
      • The influence of mobility and remotely sensed chlorophyll a were also tested
    29. Catchments as simple dynamical systems: A case study on methods and data requirements for parameter identification

      L. A. Melsen, A. J. Teuling, S. W. van Berkum, P. J. J. F. Torfs and R. Uijlenhoet

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014720

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Automatic calibration, recession analysis, and Boussinesq theory are compared
      • Automatic calibration leads to the highest model efficiencies
      • One season of data is needed for robust parameter estimation
    30. Absolute versus temporal anomaly and percent of saturation soil moisture spatial variability for six networks worldwide

      L. Brocca, G. Zucco, H. Mittelbach, T. Moramarco and S. I. Seneviratne

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015684

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • The behavior of absolute and anomaly soil moisture data is highly different
      • The spatial variability of temporal anomalies is much lower than absolute values
      • The variability of temporal anomalies has a miminum for intermediate conditions
    31. Annual bank and point bar morphodynamics of a meandering river determined by high-accuracy multitemporal laser scanning and flow data

      E. Lotsari, M. Vaaja, C. Flener, H. Kaartinen, A. Kukko, E. Kasvi, H. Hyyppä, J. Hyyppä and P. Alho

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014106

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Bank and point bar morphodynamics are analyzed by means of multitemporal data
      • Morphodynamics differ annually, but are rather consistent in a given year
      • Changes are most dependent on spring flow peak characteristics
    32. Analytical optimization of demand management strategies across all urban water use sectors

      Kenneth Friedman, James P. Heaney, Miguel Morales and John Palenchar

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014261

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • An analytical solution is presented for optimal urban water demand management
      • This approach allows for integrated management of all water use sectors
      • The data driven parcel level approach allows for strategic targeting
    33. Spatiotemporal flood sensitivity to annual precipitation: Evidence for landscape-climate coevolution

      Rui A. P. Perdigão and Günter Blöschl

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015365

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Spatial and temporal sensitivities of floods to precipitation can differ
      • Symmetry breaks relate to landscape-climate coevolution
      • Simple dynamical model of coevolution supports statistical results
    34. The role of tributary relative timing and sequencing in controlling large floods

      Ian Pattison, Stuart N. Lane, Richard J. Hardy and Sim M. Reaney

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014067

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Tributary timing is a significant control on downstream flooding
      • Synergy occurs between two subwatersheds, meaning impacts are unpredictable
      • Modifying biophysical properties play an important management due to timing
    35. Hydrodynamic parameters of a sandy soil determined by ground-penetrating radar inside a single ring infiltrometer

      Emmanuel Léger, Albane Saintenoy and Yves Coquet

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014226

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Monitoring the wetting front with on-ground GPR
      • Obtaining the whole set of Mualem-van Genuchten parameters
    36. Analytical model for flow duration curves in seasonally dry climates

      Marc F. Müller, David N. Dralle and Sally E. Thompson

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015301

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Probabilistic derivation of flow distribution in seasonally dry climate
      • Successfully applied in Nepal, California, and Western Australia
      • Disentangles inter- and intra-annual streamflow variations
    37. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Principal Component Geostatistical Approach for large-dimensional inverse problems

      P. K. Kitanidis and J. Lee

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014630

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • The geostatistical inverse method can now be applied for large problems
      • The large reduction in computational cost may entail very small accuracy loss
      • The method uses forward models and is easily parallelizable
    38. Large-scale hydraulic tomography and joint inversion of head and tracer data using the Principal Component Geostatistical Approach (PCGA)

      J. Lee and P. K. Kitanidis

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015483

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • We test the efficiency and accuracy of the PCGA with implementation guidance
      • The PCGA requires making calls to a forward model without the adjoint-state method
      • The randomized technique enables the low-rank approximation of large covariance
    39. Increased evaporation following widespread tree mortality limits streamflow response

      J. A. Biederman, A. A. Harpold, D. J. Gochis, B. E. Ewers, D. E. Reed, S. A. Papuga and P. D. Brooks

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2013WR014994

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Water vapor loss remained high following forest mortality
      • Abiotic evaporation counteracted reduced transpiration
      • Streamflow did not increase, in contrast to expectations
    40. Optimal plant water-use strategies under stochastic rainfall

      Stefano Manzoni, Giulia Vico, Gabriel Katul, Sari Palmroth and Amilcare Porporato

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015375

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Key Points

      • Plant hydraulic traits control mean transpiration and hence plant fitness
      • Coordination among plant hydraulic traits maximizes mean transpiration
      • Optimal coordination is tighter in mesic climates or with intermittent rain

VIEW

  1. 1 - 42

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION