Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 2

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Editors-in-Chief: Allen Moore, University of Georgia, USA; Andrew Beckerman, University of Sheffield, UK; Jennifer Firn, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Impact Factor: 2.537

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 54/150 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 2045-7758

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  1. 1 - 30
  1. ORIGINAL RESEARCH

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Spring phenology of cotton bollworm affects wheat yield

      Jian Huang and Jing Li

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2719

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      Expansion of the asynchronous responses in change rate of wheat anthesis and overwintering cotton bollworm likely decreased wheat yield due to climate warming in the future. The change of spring phenology of cotton bollworm affected wheat yield due to climate warming.

  2. Original Research

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      Interactions between body size, abundance, seasonality, and phenology in forest beetles

      Mark A. K. Gillespie, Tone Birkemoe and Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2732

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      Using a large dataset covering 13 years of insect sampling, this article explores the associations between body size, abundance, seasonality and phenology. The results highlight the temporal specialization of large beetle species and we discuss the interaction between this and other traits.

  3. ORIGINAL RESEARCH

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      Determining the factors affecting the distribution of Muscari latifolium, an endemic plant of Turkey, and a mapping species distribution model

      Hatice Yilmaz, Osman Yalçın Yilmaz and Yaşar Feyza Akyüz

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2766

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      Muscari latifolium is an endemic bulbous species of Turkey. Factors were determined that affect the distribution on M. latifolium. We used a large environmental variable data set and simplified them with BRTs. We used biotic interactions in the model. The information obtained in the study can be used to support management, conservation, and, if needed, restoration programs for this species.

  4. Original Research

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      Seasonal home range dynamics and sex differences in habitat use in a threatened, coastal marsh bird

      Jaan R. Kolts and Susan B. McRae

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2761

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      In a resident population of the king rail, a threatened species, radiotelemetry revealed seasonal variation in home range size, variable patterns of habitat use among life stages, and previously unknown sexual segregation in habitat use during the nonbreeding period. We show that members of this coastal breeding population move between natural marsh and managed impoundments at key life-history stages. In particular, we report habitat preferences during the brood-rearing period, a life stage about which exceedingly little is known for rails and other marsh birds.

  5. ORIGINAL RESEARCH

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      Community assembly in Lake Tanganyika cichlid fish: quantifying the contributions of both niche-based and neutral processes

      Thijs Janzen, Adriana Alzate, Moritz Muschick, Martine E. Maan, Fons van der Plas and Rampal S. Etienne

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2689

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      Neolamprologus fasciatus in it’s natural habitat. Picture taken at Kalambo Lodge, Lake Tanganyika, Zambia by Thijs Janzen.

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      Abundance distributions for tree species in Great Britain: A two-stage approach to modeling abundance using species distribution modeling and random forest

      Louise Hill, Andy Hector, Gabriel Hemery, Simon Smart, Matteo Tanadini and Nick Brown

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2661

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      Producing accurate, fine-resolution abundance distributions has long been an important aim for theoretical ecology and would have a wide range of practical applications. We have developed a straightforward and user-friendly method for this, first modeling the probability of occupancy of a species and then linking the results of this to a small amount of abundance data, and show that it produces good-quality maps of predicted abundance for 20 British tree species.

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      Composition of riparian litter input regulates organic matter decomposition: Implications for headwater stream functioning in a managed forest landscape

      Johan Lidman, Micael Jonsson, Ryan M. Burrows, Mirco Bundschuh and Ryan A. Sponseller

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2726

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      We investigated how variation in riparian plant community composition, and thus variation in quality of litter input to streams, influenced in-stream litter decomposition rates, using litter of three native and one introduced tree species. We also measured water chemistry, as this is known to influence rates of litter decomposition. Contrary to what has been shown previously, we found that litter-input quality was the primary driver of decomposition rates, but that the main drivers differed between the native and the introduced species.

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      Responses of holocyclic and anholocyclic Rhopalosiphum padi populations to low-temperature and short-photoperiod induction

      Xiong Peng, Xianfeng Qiao and Maohua Chen

      Version of Record online: 19 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2720

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      Aphids provide an excellent model for studying the evolution of sex and ecological adaptation of insects; empirically examining the relative costs and benefits of sexual versus asexual reproduction, we identified two different life cycles (holocyclic and anholocyclic) in six geographically distant populations of Rhopalosiphum padi and evaluated the development and reproduction of holocyclic and anholocyclic populations. The results provided evidence for the short-term cost of sex.

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      Local site differences in survival and parasitism of periwinkles (Littorina sitkana Philippi, 1846)

      Mónica Ayala-Díaz, Jean M. L. Richardson and Bradley R. Anholt

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2708

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      Subpopulations of the intertidal periwinkle Littorina sitkana have potential to show differential survival in a small geographical area. We show that four subpopulations of L. sitkana differ in survival and parasite communities, but survival does not seem to be related to parasite presence. We compare maximum likelihood (program MARK) and Bayesian (program WinBUGS) inference modes and state advantages and disadvantages of both statistical approaches.

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      Edge responses are different in edges under natural versus anthropogenic influence: a meta-analysis using ground beetles

      Tibor Magura, Gábor L. Lövei and Béla Tóthmérész

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2722

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      We hypothesized that the dissimilar edge histories (edges maintained only by natural processes vs. edges repeatedly disturbed by anthropogenic activities) will be reflected in the diversity and assemblage composition of inhabitants. A meta-analysis, testing this “history-based edge effect” hypothesis showed that the diversity-enhancing properties and filter function of the forest edges are significantly different according to their history.

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      Evaluating the responses of forest ecosystems to climate change and CO2 using dynamic global vegetation models

      Xiang Song and Xiaodong Zeng

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2735

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      This work investigates the response of the forest ecosystem structure to changes in climate (temperature and precipitation) and CO2 concentration by two dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs): IAP-DGVM coupled with CLM3 and CLM4-CNDV. It is predicted that warming benefits most boreal forests, while cooling is conductive to temperate and tropical forests. Furthermore, the changes in forest fractional coverage largely depend on forest ecosystem component and secondly rely on climatic factors.

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      Tracing the history and ecological context of Wolbachia double infection in a specialist host (Urophora cardui)—parasitoid (Eurytoma serratulae) system

      Jes Johannesen

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2713

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      I tested the hypothesis that immigration of a specialist endoparasitoid (Eurytoma serratulae) led to transmission of its Wolbachia strain to the fly host Urophora cardui, resulting in double-strain infection, by analyzing infection in the fly before (2001) and after (2013–2014) immigration of the parasitoid. I then used geographic and community level surveys to study the age, stability, and prevalence of infections in host and parasitoid. Based on the data, I derive a mechanistic hypothesis to explain horizontal transmissions among diverse holometabolic taxa.

  6. Original Research

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      No inbreeding depression in laboratory-reared individuals of the parasitoid wasp Allotropa burrelli

      Bastien Quaglietti, Lucie Tamisier, Géraldine Groussier, Alexandre Fleisch, Isabelle Le Goff, Nicolas Ris, Philippe Kreiter, Xavier Fauvergue and Thibaut Malausa

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2643

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      Inbreeding depression is the biggest issue in reared populations, including biological control agents, and may lead to a decrease in production yield and even to population extinction. We assessed the risk of inbreeding depression in laboratory-reared individuals of Allotropa burrelli, natural enemy of the Comstock mealybug, and found no evidence of major inbreeding depression.

  7. ORIGINAL RESEARCH

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      Invasive termites in a changing climate: A global perspective

      Grzegorz Buczkowski and Cleo Bertelsmeier

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2674

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      We used predictive climate modeling to provide the first global risk assessment for 13 of the world's most invasive termites. Our results show that all but one termite species are expected to significantly increase in their global distribution, irrespective of the climatic scenario and year. The range shifts by species (shift vectors) revealed a complex pattern of distributional changes across latitudes rather than simple poleward expansion.

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      Growth-form and spatiality driving the functional difference of native and alien aquatic plants in Europe

      Balázs A. Lukács, Anna E. Vojtkó, Attila Mesterházy, Attila Molnár V, Kristóf Süveges, Zsolt Végvári, Guido Brusa and Bruno E. L. Cerabolini

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2703

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      Alien aquatic plants differs in their leaf traits from native aquatic plants. The trait differences of natives and aliens are driven by species growth-form and spatiality factors.

  8. Original Research

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      Eggshell coloration and its importance in postmating sexual selection

      Miroslav Poláček, Matteo Griggio, Ivan Mikšík, Michaela Bartíková, Manfred Eckenfellner and Herbert Hoi

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2664

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      Female birds invest more into eggshell pigmentation when mated to more attractive partners which are males with bigger melanin-based ornaments relative to their own. Males in turn invest more in parental care (feeding) when nestlings hatch from more pigmented eggs. Our results indicate that eggshell coloration signals female postmating investment into offspring rather than female quality. Thus, the question why birds lay colorful eggs can be also seen in a sexual context.

  9. ORIGINAL RESEARCH

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      Geographical differentiation of the Euchiloglanis fish complex (Teleostei: Siluriformes) in the Hengduan Mountain Region, China: Phylogeographic evidence of altered drainage patterns

      Yanping Li, Arne Ludwig and Zuogang Peng

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2715

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      This study utilized phylogeographic methods based on mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite data to investigate the genetic structure and geographic differentiation of the Euchiloglanis species complex throughout the Hengduan Mountain Region. Furthermore, the study tested a vicariant speciation hypothesis derived from geological evidence of large-scale paleo-drainage changes that were linked to the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. We believe that our study makes a significant contribution to the literature because the results, in combination with geologic data, provide evidence that supports the hypothesis of quaternary divergence between fish populations, which resulted from vicariant isolation due to river capture events.

  10. Original Research

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      The interplay between natural and sexual selection in the evolution of sexual size dimorphism in Sceloporus lizards (Squamata: Phrynosomatidae)

      Víctor H. Jiménez-Arcos, Salomón Sanabria-Urbán and Raúl Cueva del Castillo

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2572

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      Using a phylogenetic comparative approach, we explored the allometric relationships among females and males of Sceloporus species. After controlling for phylogenetic effects, results suggested that selection for higher fecundity has had a main role on the evolution of female body size. Even though there is a strong effect of body size on female fecundity, we found that the relative impact of sexual selection acting on males has been stronger than fecundity selection acting on females.

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      Sex-specific responses to territorial intrusions in a communication network: Evidence from radio-tagged great tits

      Lysanne Snijders, Kees van Oers and Marc Naguib

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2686

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      Sexually selected signals are commonly assumed to have a dual function: attracting mates and repelling rivals; yet, these contrasting responses often remain untested in the field. Using a novel tracking system, we show that the spatial behavior of male and female great tits (Parus major) indeed changes in relation to long-distance vocal signals of a male neighbor. Stronger signalers were also older and in better body condition, suggesting that the strength of a male's vocal response can simultaneously provide relevant public information to both the males and the females in the neighborhood.

  11. ORIGINAL RESEARCH

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      The most primitive metazoan animals, the placozoans, show high sensitivity to increasing ocean temperatures and acidities

      Dáša Schleicherová, Katharina Dulias, Hans-Jűrgen Osigus, Omid Paknia, Heike Hadrys and Bernd Schierwater

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2678

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      We here test placozoans for their sensitivity to increasing ocean temperature and acidification in relevance to the current forecasts of global warming effects. Our results (1) show that placozoans respond highly sensitively to such changes, (2) reveal differential responses in different placozoan lineages, and (3) encourage efforts to develop placozoans as a potential long-term biomonitoring system for global change in coastal marine environments.

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      Effect of marker choice and thermal cycling protocol on zooplankton DNA metabarcoding studies

      Laurence J. Clarke, Jason M. Beard, Kerrie M. Swadling and Bruce E. Deagle

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2667

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      We use metabarcoding to characterize zooplankton assemblages with three different metabarcoding markers (nuclear 18S rDNA, mitochondrial COI, and mitochondrial 16S rDNA) and compare their performance in terms of taxonomic coverage, taxonomic resolution, and correspondence between morphology- and DNA-based identification. Our results show the taxonomic coverage and resolution provided by degenerate COI primers, combined with a comparatively well-developed reference sequence database, make them valuable metabarcoding markers for biodiversity assessment.

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      Prevalence dependence in model goodness measures with special emphasis on true skill statistics

      Imelda Somodi, Nikolett Lepesi and Zoltán Botta-Dukát

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2654

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      It has long been a concern that performance measures of species distribution models (SDM) react to attributes of the modeled entity arising from the input data structure (including the ratio of presences and absences known as prevalence) rather than to model performance. The true skill statistics (TSS) has been propagated as unaffected by prevalence changes; however, experience questioned this. Therefore, we examined possible causes of observed prevalence dependence for TSS, while also extending the theory of prevalence dependence in general.

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      Increased juvenile predation is not associated with evolved differences in adult brain size in Trinidadian killifish (Rivulus hartii)

      Shannon M. Beston, Whitnee Broyles and Matthew R. Walsh

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2668

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      Here, we evaluate the role of age-specific mortality on the evolution of adult brain size in Trinidadian killifish, Rivulus hartii. Rivulus are found at sites with guppy predators that prey upon juvenile Rivulus, as well as at sites that lack predators. We compared brain size of second-generation common garden-reared Rivulus from sites with and without guppy predators and found no difference in brain size between these sites.

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      Links between soil microbial communities and plant traits in a species-rich grassland under long-term climate change

      Emma J. Sayer, Anna E. Oliver, Jason D. Fridley, Andrew P. Askew, Robert T. E. Mills and J. Philip Grime

      Version of Record online: 9 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2700

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      Climate change can influence soil microbes indirectly by altering plant growth and species composition. Our study shows that 17 years of experimental climate change treatments in a species-rich grassland modified soil microbial communities. Soil fungi and subordinate microbial taxa were particularly affected by summer drought. The shifts in microbial community structure were linked to changes in the vegetation and specific plant traits reflecting the quality of resources available to soil microbes.

  12. Original Research

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      Refuge or predation risk? Alternate ways to perceive hiker disturbance based on maternal state of female caribou

      Frédéric Lesmerises, Chris J. Johnson and Martin-Hugues St-Laurent

      Version of Record online: 6 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2672

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      Many large mammals perceive humans as potential predators, but in some cases, human presence can offer a refuge from real predators. We related the observed behavior of female caribou to a real-time estimation of hiker abundance on trails in a National Park and demonstrated that caribou response differed depending on maternal state. Females with a calf decreased their vigilance with an increased number of hikers, while lone females fed less and were more vigilant.

  13. Reviews

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      Trait-based approaches to analyze links between the drivers of change and ecosystem services: Synthesizing existing evidence and future challenges

      Violeta Hevia, Berta Martín-López, Sara Palomo, Marina García-Llorente, Francesco de Bello and José A. González

      Version of Record online: 4 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2692

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      We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the scientific literature linking direct drivers of change and ecosystem services via functional traits. We found multiple evidence of links, particularly between land-use changes and regulating services mediated by vegetation and invertebrate functional traits. Our review highlights the existence of “key functional traits”, understood as those that have the capacity to influence the provision of multiple ecosystem services, while responding to specific drivers of change, across a variety of systems and organisms.

  14. Original Research

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      Time-restricted flight ability influences dispersal and colonization rates in a group of freshwater beetles

      Lars Lønsmann Iversen, Riinu Rannap, Lars Briggs and Kaj Sand-Jensen

      Version of Record online: 4 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2680

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      This study examines how flight ability might vary across seasons and between two closely related genera of freshwater beetles. We find profound differences in flight ability between the two study genera across seasons, and the data suggest that different dispersal potential can account for different local occurrences between the study genera. Our findings provide some of the first insights into the understanding of seasonal restrictions in flight patterns of aquatic beetles and their consequences for species distributions.

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      Combining habitat loss and agricultural intensification improves our understanding of drivers of change in avian abundance in a North American cropland anthrome

      John E. Quinn, Tala Awada, Federico Trindade, Lilyan Fulginiti and Richard Perrin

      Version of Record online: 3 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2670

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      Identification of means to accommodate demand for food, fiber, and fuel while protecting biodiversity is essential. We analyzed the response of species abundance to multiple measures of agricultural change over a 40-year period along the 41st parallel in the central United States. These data provide evidence that a more comprehensive analysis of the relationship between North American biodiversity and agricultural production is necessary to improve conservation decision-making and regional conservation prioritization.

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      IRBAS: An online database to collate, analyze, and synthesize data on the biodiversity and ecology of intermittent rivers worldwide

      Catherine Leigh, Baptiste Laporte, Núria Bonada, Ken Fritz, Hervé Pella, Eric Sauquet, Klement Tockner and Thibault Datry

      Version of Record online: 3 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2679

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      The Intermittent River Biodiversity Analysis and Synthesis (IRBAS) project has collated, analyzed, and synthesized data from across the world on the biodiversity and environmental characteristics of intermittent rivers. The IRBAS database (http://irbas.cesab.org) integrates and provides free access to these data, contributing to the growing, and global, knowledge base on these ubiquitous and important river systems. The database serves as a portal, storage, standardization, and discovery tool, enabling collation, synthesis, and analysis of data to elucidate patterns in river biodiversity and guide management.

  15. ORIGINAL RESEARCH

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      Out of Africa: Biogeography and diversification of the pantropical pond skater genus Limnogonus Stål, 1868 (Hemiptera: Gerridae)

      Zhen Ye, Yahui Zhen, Yanyan Zhou and Wenjun Bu

      Version of Record online: 1 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.2688

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      The historical biogeography of the pond skater genus Limnogonus was reconstructed to evaluate the impact of biogeographical scenarios in shaping their modern transoceanic disjunction. The current transoceanic disjunctions in Limnogonus could be better explained by the disruption of “mixed-mesophytic” forest belt; however, the direct transoceanic LDD between the Neotropics and Africa could not be ruled out.

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