Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 3

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Editors-in-Chief: Allen Moore, University of Georgia, USA and Andrew Beckerman, University of Sheffield, UK

Impact Factor: 2.32

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 63/145 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 2045-7758

VIEW

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  2. 21 - 40
  3. 41 - 45
  1. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Context-dependent outcomes in a reproductive mutualism between two freshwater fish species

      Brandon K. Peoples and Emmanuel A. Frimpong

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1979

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      We investigated context dependency in outcomes of a reproductive mutualism between two freshwater fishes. The outcome switched from commensalistic to mutualistic with improved spawning habitat quality.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Morphometric traits capture the climatically driven species turnover of 10 spruce taxa across China

      He Li, GuoHong Wang, Yun Zhang and WeiKang Zhang

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1971

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      Previous studies have characterized the overall influence of climate on spruce distribution and trait variation. However, most of the previous studies of these topics in spruce have focused on one or a few species, and little is known about the relationship between trait variation and species turnover for a wide array of spruce species at large scales, and even less has been clarified about relative roles of climate and phylogenetic background in driving morphometric trait variation. Using data from field surveys in the spruce forests across China, we showed that the climatically driven replacement of the spruces in question could be well indicated by the between-species variation in morphometric traits that carry weak phylogenetic signals but strong climatic signals and demonstrate a narrower temperature amplitude but wider ranges on the moisture gradient.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Fluctuating selection on basal metabolic rate

      Johan F. Nilsson and Jan-Åke Nilsson

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1954

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      We here show that BMR is under selection in a wild population of Blue tits. Interestingly the direction of selection differs between years, possibly due to environmental conditions.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Implications of recurrent disturbance for genetic diversity

      Ian D. Davies, Geoffrey J. Cary, Erin L. Landguth, David B. Lindenmayer and Sam C. Banks

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1948

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      We examine the relative importance of factors driving genetic diversity within and among populations that persist in an environment of recurrent disturbance. We demonstrate likely scenarios under which future changes to disturbance size, severity or frequency will have the strongest impacts on population genetic patterns. In addition, our findings have implications for the inference of biological processes from genetic data, because the effects of dispersal on genetic patterns were strongly mediated by disturbance regimes.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The use of Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium in clonal plant systems

      Vladimir Douhovnikoff and Matthew Leventhal

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1946

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      There is an important risk of misinterpretation when HW calculations are applied to a clonal plant not recognized as clonal, as well as when the definition of the individual for those calculations is not clearly stated in a known clonal species. Focusing on heterozygosity values we investigate cases that demonstrate the extreme range of potential modeling outcomes and describe the different contexts where a particular definition could better meet ecological modeling goals. We emphasize that the HW model can be ecologically relevant when applied to clonal plants, but caution is necessary in how it is used, reported and interpreted.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Testosterone and cortisol concentrations vary with reproductive status in wild female red deer

      Alyson T. Pavitt, Josephine M. Pemberton, Loeske E. B. Kruuk and Craig A. Walling

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1945

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      Although hormones are key regulators of many fitness and life history traits, the causes of individual level variation in hormones, particularly in wild systems, remain poorly understood. Using faecal samples collected from females in a wild red deer population between 2001 and 2013, this study shows how faecal androgen and cortisol metabolite concentrations change with age and season, and how individual differences may arise due to variation in reproductive state. This ultimately illustrates the importance of accounting for a female's life history and current reproductive status, as well as temporal variation, when examining individual differences in hormone levels.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Female Salix viminalis are more severely infected by Melampsora spp. but neither sex experiences associational effects

      Kim K. Moritz, Christer Björkman, Amy L. Parachnowitsch and Johan A. Stenberg

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1923

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      We investigated sex effects of individual plants and associational effects of plant sex, in a large-scale field experiment. Female dioecious Salix viminalis were more severely infected by rust-causing Melampsora spp. Furthermore, a literature survey revealed that female-biased fungal infections are most common in dioecious plants.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Response of pest control by generalist predators to local-scale plant diversity: a meta-analysis

      Anicet Gbèblonoudo Dassou and Philippe Tixier

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1917

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      We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 papers containing 175 independent measures of the relationship between plant diversity and arthropod communities. We found that generalist predators and herbivores had a strong positive and a weak negative response to plant diversity, respectively. The response was negative for specialists and not significant for generalists. Our results suggest that the response of herbivores to plant diversity at the local scale is a balance between habitat and trophic effects that vary according to arthropod specialization and habitat type.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Intraspecific variation in seed dispersal of a Neotropical tree and its relationship to fruit and tree traits

      Carol K. Augspurger, Susan E. Franson, Katherine C. Cushman and Helene C. Muller-Landau

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1905

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      Variation in fruit traits among 20 parents of Platypodium elegans, a wind-dispersed tropical canopy tree, explained descent rate in still air, which predicted dispersal distance from a forest tower. Saplings of six parents were heavily concentrated in the 95th percentiles of seed shadow distributions. Variation among parents in these distribution tails are likely determined by wind conditions as they could not be explained by fruit or tree traits.

    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Molecular and iridescent feather reflectance data reveal recent genetic diversification and phenotypic differentiation in a cloud forest hummingbird

      Juan Francisco Ornelas, Clementina González, Blanca E. Hernández-Baños and Jaime García-Moreno

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1950

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      This study is the first to examine the alternative patterns of phylogeographic structure of hummingbird species on cloud forest communities in the Mesoamerican region. We found that both genetic and gorget coloration differentiation of amethyst-throated hummingbirds were highly geographically structured. Results of species distribution modelling and Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis fit a model of lineage divergence after the LGM when tested against competing scenarios, and that its suitable habitat was disjunct during current and past conditions. Our findings challenge the the generality of the contraction/expansion glacial model to cloud forest-interior species and urge management of cloud forest to prevent further loss of genetic diversity or extinction.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Using Africa's protected area network to estimate the global population of a threatened and declining species: a case study of the Critically Endangered White-headed Vulture Trigonoceps occipitalis

      Campbell Murn, Peter Mundy, Munir Z. Virani, Wendy D. Borello, Graham J. Holloway and Jean-Marc Thiollay

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1931

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      Africa's protected area network was used as the basis for estimating the White-headed Vulture (Trigonoceps occipitalis) population, a critically endangered species restricted to protected areas. We estimate there are fewer than 2000 nests across a fragmented range of approximately 400 protected areas; only five protected areas are estimated to contain more than 20 nests.

    12. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Population genomics of divergence among extreme and intermediate color forms in a polymorphic insect

      Jeffrey D. Lozier, Jason M. Jackson, Michael E. Dillon and James P. Strange

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1928

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      Geographic variation in insect coloration is among the most intriguing examples of rapid phenotypic evolution and provides opportunities to study mechanisms of phenotypic change and diversification in closely related lineages. The bumble bee Bombus bifarius comprises two geographically disparate color groups characterized by red-banded and black-banded abdominal pigmentation, but with a range of spatially and phenotypically intermediate populations, and previous microsatellite studies revealed that B. bifarius are structured into two major groups concordant with geography and color pattern, but also suggest ongoing gene flow among regional populations. Here we analyze populations representing two extremes and an intermediate color form with RNAseq and RADtag sequencing, and find substantial divergence but little evidence for admixture in the intermediate population, illustrating the importance of taking a genome-wide perspective for understanding population genetic processes in recently diverging populations.

    13. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Genomic population structure of freshwater-resident and anadromous ide (Leuciscus idus) in north-western Europe

      Mikkel Skovrind, Morten Tange Olsen, Filipe Garrett Vieira, George Pacheco, Henrik Carl, M. Thomas P. Gilbert and Peter Rask Møller

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1909

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      Ide (Leuciscus idus) are stenohaline freshwater fish that primarily inhabits rivers, with frequent anadromous behavior when sea salinity does not exceed 15%. We used Genotyping-by-Sequencing to determine genomic population structure of both freshwater resident and anadromous ide populations in north-western Europe. In addition to providing a first insight into the population structure our results also demonstrate high level of differentiation between sites hosting freshwater resident populations, but little differentiation among anadromous populations. Thus ide exhibit the genomic population structure of both a typical freshwater species, and a typical anadromous species.

    14. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Effects of fertilization on microbial abundance and emissions of greenhouse gases (CH4 and N2O) in rice paddy fields

      Xianfang Fan, Haiyang Yu, Qinyan Wu, Jing Ma, Hua Xu, Jinghui Yang and Yiqing Zhuang

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1879

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      Effects of fertilization on microbial abundance and emissions of greenhouse gases (CH4 and N2O) in rice paddy fields.

    15. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Accounting for size-specific predation improves our ability to predict the strength of a trophic cascade

      Christine F. Stevenson, Kyle W. Demes and Anne K. Salomon

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1870

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      We estimated shifts in grazing pressure associated with changes in the abundance and per capita consumption rates of sea urchins triggered by size-selective predation by sea otters (Enhydra lutris). We provide strong evidence that incorporating size-specific parameters into ecological models enhances our ability to describe species interactions and predict trophic cascades by accounting for a common and large source of variation in per capita interaction strength: size.

    16. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A conserved pattern in plant-mediated interactions between herbivores

      Jing Lu, Christelle A. M. Robert, Yonggen Lou and Matthias Erb

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1922

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      We investigated the influence of herbivore identity and plant genotype on the interaction between leaf-chewing and root-feeding herbivores in maize and found a highly conserved pattern. This finding opens up the possibility of adaptation of higher trophic levels and neighbouring plants and suggests that plant-mediated interactions may contribute more strongly to evolutionary dynamics in terrestrial (agro)ecosystems than previously assumed.

    17. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Fine root tradeoffs between nitrogen concentration and xylem vessel traits preclude unified whole-plant resource strategies in Helianthus

      Alan W. Bowsher, Chase M. Mason, Eric W. Goolsby and Lisa A. Donovan

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1947

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      Recent work suggests variation in plant growth strategies is governed by an evolutionary tradeoff in resource acquisition and use, ranging from a fast-growing, resource-acquisitive strategy to a resource-conservative, stress-tolerant strategy. Here, we investigated variation in fine root morphology, chemistry, and anatomy in 26 Helianthus species and compared root trait variation in this study with leaf trait variation previously reported for a parallel greenhouse study of these species. We found little evidence for correlated evolution of root traits or for a single acquisition–conservation tradeoff at the whole-plant level, likely reflecting the vastly different selection pressures shaping roots and leaves, and the different resources they are optimized to obtain.

    18. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Dominant male song performance reflects current immune state in a cooperatively breeding songbird

      Jenny E. York, Andrew N. Radford, Ton G. Groothuis and Andrew J. Young

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1938

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      Conspicuous displays are thought to have evolved as signals of individual “quality”, though precisely what they encode remains a focus of debate. We experimentally demonstrate that male song performance is impaired by immune system activation in the cooperatively breeding white-browed sparrow weaver (Plocepasser mahali). Impacts of current state on signaling may be of particular importance in social species, where subordinates may benefit from an ability to identify and subsequently challenge same-sex dominants in a weakened state.

    19. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Nested species interactions promote feasibility over stability during the assembly of a pollinator community

      Serguei Saavedra, Rudolf P. Rohr, Jens M. Olesen and Jordi Bascompte

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1930

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this manuscript, we introduce novel mathematical methods to investigate whether species mutualistic interactions are more conditioned by the community's need to be stable or feasible. We clearly demonstrate that there is a general trade-off between feasibility and stability in mutualistic communities. Additionally, we unveil that the nested architecture of interactions is responsible for increasing feasibility at the expense of stability.

    20. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Impacts of temperature on giant panda habitat in the north Minshan Mountains

      Gang Liu, Tianpei Guan, Qiang Dai, Huixin Li and Minghao Gong

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1901

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      We integrated temperature data with two main habitat parameters, vegetation and elevation, to evaluate the influence of climate change on giant panda habitat and temperature preferences using spatial analysis and a habitat assessment model in the north Minshan Mountains. The results suggest that giant pandas might have the potential to be resilient to climate change.

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