Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 10

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Editors-in-Chief: Allen Moore, University of Georgia, USA and Andrew Beckerman, University of Sheffield, UK

Impact Factor: 1.658

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 85/141 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 2045-7758

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  2. 21 - 26
  1. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Separation in flowering time contributes to the maintenance of sympatric cryptic plant lineages

      Stefan G. Michalski and Walter Durka

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1481

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      Sympatric cryptic lineages are a challenge for the understanding of species coexistence and lineage diversification. Here, we show that two homoploid and sympatrically coexisting lineages within a common wetland plant are genetically highly differentiated but morphologically cryptic. We argue that the strong differentiation in flowering time contributes to reproductive isolation and the maintenance of these lineages.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Heteroskedasticity as a leading indicator of desertification in spatially explicit data

      David A. Seekell and Vasilis Dakos

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1510

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      Vegetation patterns change predictably prior to desertification. Statistical indicators summarize these changes, warning that adaptive management may be necessary.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Occurrence of an invasive coral in the southwest Atlantic and comparison with a congener suggest potential niche expansion

      Lélis A. Carlos-Júnior, Danilo M. Neves, Newton P. U. Barbosa, Timothy P. Moulton and Joel C. Creed

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1506

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      The coral Tubastraea tagusensis is native to the Galapagos Archipelago and has successfully invaded the Brazilian coast. A Species Distribution Model (SDM) did not predict the invasion. Niche conservatism, an assumption of the SDM procedure, did not hold and the use of SDMs should be treated with caution when applied to biological invasion (or climate change) scenarios.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Extreme heat changes post-heat wave community reassembly

      Linda I. Seifert, Guntram Weithoff and Matthijs Vos

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1490

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      Investigating the effects of different heat wave intensities to a bi-trophic plankton community, we could show that community reassembly was significantly changed as it was more variable, and hence less predictable, after an extreme heat wave, and more canalized after a moderate one. Our results suggest that ecological legacies introduced by extremely high temperature events may change subsequent ecological recovery and even prevent the successful re-establishment of lost species.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Does sex-biased dispersal account for the lack of geographic and host-associated differentiation in introduced populations of an aphid parasitoid?

      Francisca Zepeda-Paulo, Blas Lavandero, Frédérique Mahéo, Emilie Dion, Yannick Outreman, Jean-Christophe Simon and Christian C. Figueroa

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1504

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      We studied the extent of gene flow mediated by female and male parasitoids and its impact on genetic differentiation in the aphid parasitoid Aphidius ervi. The results support a high gene flow among parasitoid populations. The high gene flow among parasitoid populations was found to be largely male-mediated.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Virulence of oomycete pathogens from Phragmites australis-invaded and noninvaded soils to seedlings of wetland plant species

      Ellen V. Crocker, Mary Ann Karp and Eric B. Nelson

      Article first published online: 5 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1468

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We examined the diversity and virulence of soil oomycete pathogens in wetland soils invaded by non-native Phragmites australis (European common reed) to better understand the potential impacts of invasive plant species on soil pathogen communities and the potential feedback of these pathogen species to influence invasive success. We isolated oomycetes from four sites over a 2-year period, collecting nearly 500 isolates belonging to 36 different species. Many of the Pythium species were differentially virulent to a range of native and non-native plant species and isolates from invaded and non-invaded soils exhibited similar levels of virulence to individual plant species with no apparent differences between native and non-native plant species were observed.

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