Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 17

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Editors-in-Chief: Allen Moore, University of Georgia, USA and Andrew Beckerman, University of Sheffield, UK

Impact Factor: 1.658

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 85/140 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 2045-7758

VIEW

  1. 1 - 20
  2. 21 - 32
  1. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Genetic variation in nuclear and mitochondrial markers supports a large sex difference in lifetime reproductive skew in a lekking species

      Yvonne I. Verkuil, Cedric Juillet, David B. Lank, Fredrik Widemo and Theunis Piersma

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1188

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      When male life time reproductive success is strongly skewed, as in lek-breeding birds, the neutral genetic variation in biparentally inherited genes is expected to be reduced relative to maternally inherited genes (while in theory, under random mating, nuclear variation should be higher than mitochondrial variation). We empirically confirmed this theoretical prediction in a lek-breeding shorebird, the ruff: nuclear variation is reduced by 97% compared to maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Experimental evolution alters the rate and temporal pattern of population growth in Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a lethal fungal pathogen of amphibians

      Jamie Voyles, Leah R. Johnson, Cheryl J. Briggs, Scott D. Cashins, Ross A. Alford, Lee Berger, Lee F. Skerratt, Rick Speare and Erica Bree Rosenblum

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1199

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      We used experimental evolution to investigate shifts in growth and virulence in Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the fungal pathogen associated with amphibian declines around the world. Our key finding is that that Bd evolves in culture and that a longer passage history is likely to lead to greater divergence from the initial state of virulence in amphibian hosts. This research helps fill a gap in understanding evolutionary shifts in a highly lethal infectious pathogen.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Life history variation in Barents Sea fish: implications for sensitivity to fishing in a changing environment

      Magnus A. Wiedmann, Raul Primicerio, Andrey Dolgov, Camilla A. M. Ottesen and Michaela Aschan

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1203

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      Life history traits can be used to assess species' response to exploitation and environmental change. Focusing on the Barents Sea fish community, we show that climate change induce a borealization of fish communities in the Arctic, and show explicitly how this promotes changes in the sensitivity to fishing. Our findings should be of interest to ecologists as well as managers.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Variation in clutch size in relation to nest size in birds

      Anders P. Møller, Frank Adriaensen, Alexandr Artemyev, Jerzy Bańbura, Emilio Barba, Clotilde Biard, Jacques Blondel, Zihad Bouslama, Jean-Charles Bouvier, Jordi Camprodon, Francesco Cecere, Anne Charmantier, Motti Charter, Mariusz Cichoń, Camillo Cusimano, Dorota Czeszczewik, Virginie Demeyrier, Blandine Doligez, Claire Doutrelant, Anna Dubiec, Marcel Eens, Tapio Eeva, Bruno Faivre, Peter N. Ferns, Jukka T. Forsman, Eduardo García-Del-Rey, Aya Goldshtein, Anne E. Goodenough, Andrew G. Gosler, Iga Góźdź, Arnaud Grégoire, Lars Gustafsson, Ian R. Hartley, Philipp Heeb, Shelley A. Hinsley, Paul Isenmann, Staffan Jacob, Antero Järvinen, Rimvydas Juškaitis, Erkki Korpimäki, Indrikis Krams, Toni Laaksonen, Bernard Leclercq, Esa Lehikoinen, Olli Loukola, Arne Lundberg, Mark C. Mainwaring, Raivo Mänd, Bruno Massa, Tomasz D. Mazgajski, Santiago Merino, Cezary Mitrus, Mikko Mönkkönen, Judith Morales-Fernaz, Xavier Morin, Ruedi G. Nager, Jan-Åke Nilsson, Sven G. Nilsson, Ana C. Norte, Markku Orell, Philippe Perret, Carla S. Pimentel, Rianne Pinxten, Ilze Priedniece, Marie-Claude Quidoz, Vladimir Remeš, Heinz Richner, Hugo Robles, Seppo Rytkönen, Juan Carlos Senar, Janne T. Seppänen, Luís P. da Silva, Tore Slagsvold, Tapio Solonen, Alberto Sorace, Martyn J. Stenning, János Török, Piotr Tryjanowski, Arie J. van Noordwijk, Mikael von Numers, Wiesław Walankiewicz and Marcel M. Lambrechts

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1189

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      Clutch size varies consistently with nest size among species of birds, albeit in a species-specific manner according to 121 slope estimates of the relationship between clutch size and nest size based on 17,472 clutches. The relationship between clutch size and nest size is causal as shown by three experiments. The reaction norm for clutch size variation with nest size shows an increase at small nest box sizes, but a leveling off at larger nest box sizes. These findings have implications for population studies of hole nesting birds (and other nest-building animals) because clutch size and hence parental care and reproductive output will in a species-specific manner depend on the choice of nest box size by scientists.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Abundance, diversity, and feeding behavior of coral reef butterflyfishes at Lord Howe Island

      Morgan S. Pratchett, Andrew S. Hoey, Christopher Cvitanovic, Jean-Paul A. Hobbs and Christopher J. Fulton

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1208

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      This study examined correlates of abundance for coral reef butterflyfishes at Lord Howe Island, which is the world's southernmost coral reef. Contrary to expectations, there was no relationship between abundance and geographic range; The single most abundant butterflyfish was a restricted range endemic, which is also seemingly very specialised in terms of its’ diet.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Sperm mixing in the polyandrous leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior

      Marlene Stürup, David R. Nash, William O. H. Hughes and Jacobus J. Boomsma

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1176

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      We analyzed long- and short-term variation in sperm use in a multiple mated, long lived ant species, by genotyping batches of eggs, as well as worker cohorts. We found no temporal variation in either egg paternity or patriline distributions in worker cohorts, consistent with expectations if queens are to maximize the benefits of genetic diversity in the colony.

  2. Rebuttal

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The role of calcium and predation on plate morph evolution in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

      Carl Smith, Rowena Spence, Iain Barber, Mirosław Przybylski and Robert J. Wootton

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1180

  3. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Historical land-use and landscape change in southern Sweden and implications for present and future biodiversity

      Qiao-Yu Cui, Marie-José Gaillard, Geoffrey Lemdahl, Li Stenberg, Shinya Sugita and Ganna Zernova

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1198

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      We studied the last three centuries of land-use history in central Småland (Southern Sweden) using historical maps, pollen records from three small bogs and models of the relationship between pollen and vegetation (the Landscape Reconstruction Algorithm, LRA). The aims of the study is to (1) evaluate the performance of the LRA for quantitative pollen-based reconstructions of past landscape and (2) discuss the impact of recent land-use changes (over the last three centuries) on changes in biodiversity (mainly landscape diversity and beetle fauna). The results indicate that the LRA is a robust modelling approach to translate pollen data into vegetation/plant cover, and that the transformation of the landscape since the 18th century strongly diminished biodiversity both at the landscape and species level.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Optimizing occupancy surveys by maximizing detection probability: application to amphibian monitoring in the Mediterranean region

      Maud Petitot, Nicolas Manceau, Philippe Geniez and Aurélien Besnard

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1207

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      The aim of this study was to define an optimised survey protocol for the Mediterranean amphibian community. We demonstrated the detection probability of amphibians sharply differed between species, the survey method used and the date of the survey. These three covariates also interacted. Thus a minimum of three visits spread over the breeding season, using a combination of all three survey methods, is needed to reach a 95% detection level for all species in the Mediterranean region.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Choosing and using diversity indices: insights for ecological applications from the German Biodiversity Exploratories

      E. Kathryn Morris, Tancredi Caruso, François Buscot, Markus Fischer, Christine Hancock, Tanja S. Maier, Torsten Meiners, Caroline Müller, Elisabeth Obermaier, Daniel Prati, Stephanie A. Socher, Ilja Sonnemann, Nicole Wäschke, Tesfaye Wubet, Susanne Wurst and Matthias C. Rillig

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1155

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      Biodiversity is a difficult concept to quantify, partly because of its multidimensional nature, and many simple to complex indices have been developed for this purpose. We collected data on diversity of herbaceous plants, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, aboveground arthropods, belowground insect larvae, and Plantago lanceolata molecular and chemical diversity in 60 temperate grasslands and calculated a variety of simple to complex diversity indices for each (S, H', D1, D2, E, BP). While these common diversity indices appeared interchangeable in simple analyses quantifying changes in diversity, when quantifying interactions between diversities the conclusions varied with the index chosen.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Elevation-dependent responses of tree mast seeding to climate change over 45 years

      Robert B. Allen, Jennifer M. Hurst, Jeanne Portier and Sarah J. Richardson

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1210

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Forty five year trends in tree seed production are tested for along an elevation gradient, in relation to temporal changes in climate, using seed count data from a southern hemisphere beech forest. We demonstrate a trend of increasing seed production, that strengthens with increasing elevation, and significant changes in four seasonal climate variables shown to strongly relate to variation in seeding. Regression coefficients for climate variables were consistent with increased seed production. The greater influence of changes in climate on seed production at higher elevations is interpreted as the result of climate driven changes in soil nutrient availability at higher elevations rather than the direct effects of climate change.

  4. Commentary

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Inappropriate analysis does not reveal the ecological causes of evolution of stickleback armour: a critique of Spence et al. 2013

      Andrew D. C. MacColl and Beth Aucott

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1179

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      In a recent paper Spence et al. sought to identify the ecological causes of morphological evolution in three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus, by examining phenotypic and environmental variation between populations on the island of North Uist, Scotland. However, by using simple qualitative assessments of phenotype and inappropriate measures of environmental variation Spence et al. have come to a conclusion that is diametrically opposite to that which we have arrived at in studying the same populations.

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