Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 5

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Editors-in-Chief: Allen Moore, University of Georgia, USA and Andrew Beckerman, University of Sheffield, UK

Impact Factor: 1.658

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 85/141 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 2045-7758

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  2. 21 - 26
  1. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Potential for adaptive evolution at species range margins: contrasting interactions between red coral populations and their environment in a changing ocean

      Jean-Baptiste Ledoux, Didier Aurelle, Nathaniel Bensoussan, Christian Marschal, Jean-Pierre Féral and Joaquim Garrabou

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1324

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In marine conservation, the deep-refugia hypothesis proposes that disturbed shallow and marginal populations of a given species can be replenished by mesophotic populations. Combining reciprocal transplant and common garden experiments with population genetics analyses we question the relevance of this hypothesis in the red coral, Corallium rubrum. Our study highlights the conservation value of marginal populations as a putative reservoir of adaptive genetic polymorphism.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Tree height–diameter allometry across the United States

      Catherine M. Hulshof, Nathan G. Swenson and Michael D. Weiser

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1328

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tree height-diameter allometry is plastic and scaling parameters vary around predicted central tendencies due to climatic variation. The magnitude of allometric variation due to climate depends largely on differences between angiosperms and gymnosperms.

  2. Hypotheses

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      Stress relief may promote the evolution of greater phenotypic plasticity in exotic invasive species: a hypothesis

      Qiao Q. Huang, Xiao Y. Pan, Zhi W. Fan and Shao L. Peng

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1424

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An open question in invasion ecology is why some exotic invaders can even evolve to be more plastic given that there may be costs to being plastic. We propose a hypothesis stating that any factors mitigating stress in the introduced range may promote exotic invaders to evolve increased adaptive plasticity by reducing the costs and increasing the benefits of plasticity.

  3. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The effect of developmental nutrition on life span and fecundity depends on the adult reproductive environment in Drosophila melanogaster

      Christina M. May, Agnieszka Doroszuk and Bas J. Zwaan

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1389

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We show that adult fecundity and lifespan depend on the developmental nutritional environment experienced in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In particular, we highlight two main findings: first: contrary to expectations, experiencing very calorically poor food during development can lead to a longer lifespan and increased fecundity in the adult fly, while calorically rich developmental food has the opposite effect; and second, the magnitude of the long term effect of developmental nutrition depends on the reproductive potential of the adult environment experienced. These findings are important for both the study of the interplay between life history traits and evolution, but also for understanding long term developmental effects on adult health.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Shifting ranges and conservation challenges for lemurs in the face of climate change

      Jason L. Brown and Anne D. Yoder

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1418

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      Major distribution patterns predicted for lemurs resulting from future climate change. Our results predict that most lemurs will experience considerable range shifts into the future.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      No-tillage and fertilization management on crop yields and nitrate leaching in North China Plain

      Manxiang Huang, Tao Liang, Lingqing Wang and Chenghu Zhou

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1420

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A field experiment was performed from 2003 to 2008 to evaluate the effects of tillage system and nitrogen regimes on crop yields and nitrate leaching from the fluvo-aquic soil with a winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-maize (Zea mays L.) double cropping system.

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