Ecology and Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 3

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Editors-in-Chief: Allen Moore, University of Georgia, USA and Andrew Beckerman, University of Sheffield, UK

Impact Factor: 2.32

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 63/145 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 2045-7758

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  1. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Varying foraging patterns in response to competition? A multicolony approach in a generalist seabird

      Anna-Marie Corman, Bettina Mendel, Christian C. Voigt and Stefan Garthe

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1884

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In a multiyear tracking study, we tested whether the foraging behaviors of incubating lesser black-backed gulls differed between six island colonies varying in size (breeding pairs) and distance to mainland, and whether any differences could be related to the foraging habitats visited. Birds fed at terrestrial and marine habitats, although birds from colonies with larger sizes tended to utilize terrestrial habitats stronger than those from small-size colonies. The clearly segregated foraging patterns among all studied colonies might be a strategy to avoid intraspecific competition, which might in turn lead to a more intensive utilization of terrestrial foraging sites offering more predictable and easily available foraging compared with the marine environment.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Dispersal, niche, and isolation processes jointly explain species turnover patterns of nonvolant small mammals in a large mountainous region of China

      Zhixin Wen, Qing Quan, Yuanbao Du, Lin Xia, Deyan Ge and Qisen Yang

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1962

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Our study indicates that dispersal, niche, and isolation processes are all important determinants of the spatial turnover patterns of nonvolant small mammals in the Hengduan Mountains. The spatial configuration of the landscape and geographic isolation can strongly influence the rate of species turnover in mountainous regions at multiple spatial scales.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The effects of habitat management on the species, phylogenetic and functional diversity of bees are modified by the environmental context

      Markus A. K. Sydenham, Stein R. Moe, Diana N. Stanescu-Yadav, Ørjan Totland and Katrine Eldegard

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1963

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We used three treatments to manipulate the habitat conditions for bees in power line clearings: clearing woody vegetation and removing the debris; clearing woody vegetation and leaving debris within treatment plots; and leaving plots unmanipulated. Manipulated plots where the debris had been removed attracted more species from the local species assemblage. However, this response was only found in the most productive and floristically diverse sites, suggesting that management plans should be adapted to local habitat conditions.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Gillespie eco-evolutionary models (GEMs) reveal the role of heritable trait variation in eco-evolutionary dynamics

      John P. DeLong and Jean P. Gibert

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1959

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      We introduce a new type of eco-evolutionary model that (1) incorporates changes in heritable trait variation through time; and (2) does not require the specification of fitness functions. We show that these models – Gillespie eco-evolutionary models, or GEMs – provide a powerful tool for understanding and modeling a wide range of eco-evolutionary processes.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Bacterial characterization of Beijing drinking water by flow cytometry and MiSeq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene

      Tingting Liu, Weiwen Kong, Nan Chen, Jing Zhu, Jingqi Wang, Xiaoqing He and Yi Jin

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1955

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      Twelve water samples were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM), heterotrophic plate count (HPC), and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. FCM was utilized in this study to obtain a better understanding of total and intact cell concentrations, which cannot be detected by HPC. The combined use of FCM to detect total bacteria concentrations and sequencing to determine the relative abundance of pathogenic bacteria resulted in the quantitative evaluation of drinking water distribution systems.

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