MicrobiologyOpen

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 6

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited by Pierre Cornelis, Microbial Interactions, VIB Department of Structural Biology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium

Online ISSN: 2045-8827

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  1. 1 - 13
  1. Original Research

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      CopM is a novel copper-binding protein involved in copper resistance in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

      Joaquín Giner-Lamia, Luis López-Maury and Francisco J. Florencio

      Article first published online: 26 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.231

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      We have characterized a new periplasmic copper-binding protein (CopM) that is part of the copper resistance mechanism in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We have showed that CopM is able to bind both Cu(I) and Cu(II) and to confer resistance to copper. Furthermore, CopM is found not only in the periplasm but also in the extracellular space and is able to reduce total copper contents in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  2. Reviews

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      Anaerobic oxidation of methane: an “active” microbial process

      Mengmeng Cui, Anzhou Ma, Hongyan Qi, Xuliang Zhuang and Guoqiang Zhuang

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.232

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      The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is an important sink of methane that plays a significant role in global warming. This review summarizes the mechanisms and associated microbes of AOM.

  3. Original Research

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      Fimbriae-mediated outer membrane vesicle production and invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis

      Chinmay K. Mantri, Chin-Ho Chen, Xinhong Dong, Jeffery Shawn Goodwin, Siddharth Pratap, Victor Paromov and Hua Xie

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.221

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      Porphyromonas gingivalis strains lacking or having a reduced FimA expression showed a significant reduction in vesiculation. Differential invasive activity was found among P. gingivalis strains

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      The Aeromonas caviae AHA0618 gene modulates cell length and influences swimming and swarming motility

      Rebecca C. Lowry, Jennifer L. Parker, Ramhari Kumbhar, Stephane Mesnage, Jonathan G. Shaw and Graham P. Stafford

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.233

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      Mutation of the AHA0618 gene in Aeromonas caviae caused an increase in motility. Similar to the mutation of a putative deglycosylation gene from Helicobacter pylori. However, in A. caviae there appeared to be an effect on flagellin glycosylation, but a small change in cell size was observed.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Linking regional variation of epibiotic bacterial diversity and trophic ecology in a new species of Kiwaidae (Decapoda, Anomura) from East Scotia Ridge (Antarctica) hydrothermal vents

      Katrin Zwirglmaier, William D. K. Reid, Jane Heywood, Christopher J. Sweeting, Benjamin D. Wigham, Nicholas V. C. Polunin, Jeff A. Hawkes, Douglas P. Connelly, David Pearce and Katrin Linse

      Article first published online: 16 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.227

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      This is the first analysis of the microbial diversity of the epibionts of a new species of Kiwa yeti crabs found in two recently discovered hydrothermal vent fields on the East Scotia Ridge, Antarctica. The composition of the epibionts community shows strong regional differences. Furthermore, stable isotope analysis of both the epibionts and the Kiwa hosts provide evidence that the epibionts serve as a food source for the crabs.

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      The evolution of Jen3 proteins and their role in dicarboxylic acid transport in Yarrowia

      Rémi Dulermo, Heber Gamboa-Meléndez, Stéphanie Michely, France Thevenieau, Cécile Neuvéglise and Jean-Marc Nicaud

      Article first published online: 16 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.225

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      Until now, two Jen family proteins, Jen1 and Jen2, were described. Here, we found and analyzed phylogenetically and functionally a third family, Jen3, in Yarrowia lipolytica. We found that these genes are involved in uptake of fumarate, malate, and succinate.

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      Role of bifidobacteria in the hydrolysis of chlorogenic acid

      Stefano Raimondi, Andrew Anighoro, Andrea Quartieri, Alberto Amaretti, Francisco A. Tomás-Barberán, Giulio Rastelli and Maddalena Rossi

      Article first published online: 16 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.219

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      This study aimed to explore the capability of potentially probiotic bifidobacteria to hydrolyze chlorogenic acid into caffeic acid (CA), and to recognize the enzymes involved in this reaction. A possible role of Bifidobacterium animal is in the activation of hydroxycinnamic acids was demonstrated and new perspectives were opened in the development of new probiotics, specifically selected for the enhanced bioconversion of phytochemicals into bioactive compounds.

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      Lignocellulose depolymerization occurs via an environmentally adapted metabolic cascades in the wood-rotting basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium

      Jin Seop Bak

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.228

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      Recalcitrant plant biomass can be efficiently utilized by a lignocellulose-degrading fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, but the regulatory and metabolic mechanisms involved are not well understood. Elucidation of the self-regulated system in P. chrysosporium is important for the enhanced utilization of renewable biomass in biorefineries for the production of chemicals and fuels. This study is the first to evaluate the interconnected lignocellulolytic networks of P. chrysosporium based on combined multi-omics approach with target optimization.

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      Dietary iron depletion at weaning imprints low microbiome diversity and this is not recovered with oral nano Fe(III)

      Dora I. A. Pereira, Mohamad F. Aslam, David M. Frazer, Annemarie Schmidt, Gemma E. Walton, Anne L. McCartney, Glenn R. Gibson, Greg J. Anderson and Jonathan J. Powell

      Article first published online: 2 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.213

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      Alterations in the gut microbiota have been recently linked to oral iron. In this work, we show that dietary iron depletion at weaning imprints low diversity in the microbiota that is not easily recovered with subsequent iron supplementation and that nano iron appears to be less accessible to the gut microbiota.

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      Deciphering a pathway of Halobacterium salinarum N-glycosylation

      Lina Kandiba and Jerry Eichler

      Article first published online: 2 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.215

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      Schematic depiction of the proposed Hbt. salinarum N-glycosylation pathway. Proteins predicted to mediate the assembly and attachment of one of the two N-linked glycans decorating the S-layer glycoprotein in this species are indicated.

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      AmgRS-mediated envelope stress-inducible expression of the mexXY multidrug efflux operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

      Calvin Ho-Fung Lau, Thomas Krahn, Christie Gilmour, Erin Mullen and Keith Poole

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.226

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      AmgRS is an envelope stress-responsive two-component system shown here to protect Pseudomonas aeruginosa from membrane damage caused by aminoglycoside-generated mistranslated polypeptides. Activation of AmgRS via mutation or following exposure of the organism to aminoglycosides promoted expression of the aminoglycoside resistance-promoting multidrug efflux operon, mexXY, dependent on the AmgRS target genes htpX and PA5528. Aminoglycoside induction of mexXY is, thus, a response to membrane damage and activation of the AmgRS two-component system.

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      Regulation of nitrite resistance of the cytochrome cbb3 oxidase by cytochrome c ScyA in Shewanella oneidensis

      Jianhua Yin, Miao Jin, Haiyan Zhang, Lili Ju, Lili Zhang and Haichun Gao

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.224

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      When in overabundance, small soluble cytochrome c ScyA enhances nitrite resistance of the cbb3 oxidase, facilitating growth against nitrite inhibition in the absence of the bd oxidase. Based on the data presented in this study, we suggest two possible underlying mechanisms, (1) that the anti-nitrite effect may be attributed to electron transfer; (2) that ScyA promotes nitrite resistance of the oxidase, possibly by direct interaction.

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      The E. coli sirtuin CobB shows no preference for enzymatic and nonenzymatic lysine acetylation substrate sites

      Alaa AbouElfetouh, Misty L. Kuhn, Linda I. Hu, Michael D. Scholle, Dylan J. Sorensen, Alexandria K. Sahu, Dörte Becher, Haike Antelmann, Milan Mrksich, Wayne F. Anderson, Bradford W. Gibson, Birgit Schilling and Alan J. Wolfe

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.223

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      We provide genetic, mass spectrometric, structural, and immunological evidence that CobB, a member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases, can reverse acetylation regardless of acetyl donor or acetylation mechanism. We also provide evidence that CobB is the predominant or perhaps the sole deacetylase in E. coli. Finally, we present evidence that three-dimensional structure should be used to predict CobB substrates.

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