MicrobiologyOpen

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 3

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited by Pierre Cornelis, Microbial Interactions, VIB Department of Structural Biology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium

Online ISSN: 2045-8827

VIEW

  1. 1 - 11
  1. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Identification of vacuoles containing extraintestinal differentiated forms of Legionella pneumophila in colonized Caenorhabditis elegans soil nematodes

      Jacqueline R. Hellinga, Rafael A. Garduño, Jay D. Kormish, Jennifer R. Tanner, Deirdre Khan, Kristyn Buchko, Celine Jimenez, Mathieu M. Pinette and Ann Karen C. Brassinga

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.271

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The facultative intracellular bacterium Legionella pneumophila features a unique morphological differentiation process that takes place in formations termed Legionella-containing vacuoles (LCVs). To date, this developmental cell cycle has only been observed in protozoa and in the HeLa epithelial cell line. Here, we report the novel observation of LCVs containing differentiated bacterial forms in Legionella-infected nematodes highlighting the potential role of soil nematodes as an additional environmental reservoir of L. pneumophila.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Posttranslational modification of a vanadium nitrogenase

      Erin K. Heiniger and Caroline S. Harwood

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.265

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We demonstrate that the activity of a somewhat unusual form of nitrogenase, vanadium nitrogenase, from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris, is inhibited by posttranslational modification in response to ammonium addition. Posttranslational modification of vanadium nitrogenase is a new finding.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives

      Seryoung Kim, Kohei Ihara, Satoshi Katsube, Hatsuhiro Hori, Tasuke Ando, Emiko Isogai and Hiroshi Yoneyama

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.269

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study, we characterized the function of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli by determining (i) its transport activity by means of inverted membrane vesicles, and (ii) the impact of the existence or nonexistence of AlaE on the susceptibility of cells to l-alanine and l-Ala-l-Ala. The results clearly demonstrated that AlaE catalyzes the active export of l-alanine using an energy of proton motive force, and functions as a “safety valve” to protect the cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Paracoccus denitrificans possesses two BioR homologs having a role in regulation of biotin metabolism

      Youjun Feng, Ritesh Kumar, Dmitry A. Ravcheev and Huimin Zhang

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.270

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recently, we determined that BioR, the GntR family of transcription factor, acts as a repressor for biotin metabolism exclusively distributed in certain species of α-proteobacteria including the zoonotic agent Brucella melitensis and the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. However, the scenario is quite unusual in Paracoccus denitrificans, the closely-related bacterium featuring with denitrification within the same phylum α-proteobacteria. Given the fact that P. denitrificans encodes two BioR homologues Pden_1431 and Pden_2922 (designated as BioR1 and BioR2, respectively), and has six predictive BioR-recognizable sites (the two bioR homologue each has one site, whereas the two bio operons (bioBFDAGC and bioYB) each contains two tandem BioR boxes), it raised the possibility that unexpected complexity is present in BioR-mediated biotin regulation. By using the integrative approaches, we defined a complex regulatory network for biotin metabolism in P. denitrificans by two BioR proteins.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Quantitative analysis of commensal Escherichia coli populations reveals host-specific enterotypes at the intra-species level

      Mounira Smati, Olivier Clermont, Alexandre Bleibtreu, Frédéric Fourreau, Anthony David, Anne-Sophie Daubié, Cécile Hignard, Odile Loison, Bertrand Picard and Erick Denamur

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.266

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We estimated the relative proportions of the Escherichia coli phylogroups in the faeces of 137 wild and domesticated animals with various diets living in the Ile de France (Paris) region by real-time PCR. We distinguished three main clusters characterised by a particular abundance of two or more phylogroups within the E. coli animal commensal populations, which we call “enterocolitypes” by analogy with the enterotypes defined in the human gut microbiota at the genus level. These enterocolitypes differed from human ones observed in a previous work using the same methodology and were associated with different host species, diets and habitats.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Protective role of bacillithiol in superoxide stress and Fe–S metabolism in Bacillus subtilis

      Zhong Fang and Patricia C. Dos Santos

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.267

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bacillus subtilis strains lacking bacillithiol (BSH) displays growth defects in minimal media which can be recover upon addition of BSH disulfide (BSSB) (A, B), casa amino acids (C), or Fe (D).

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A factor converting viable but nonculturable Vibrio cholerae to a culturable state in eukaryotic cells is a human catalase

      Mitsutoshi Senoh, Takashi Hamabata and Yoshifumi Takeda

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.264

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study, a factor converting viable but nonculturable to culturable state was identified as a human catalase. It was confirmed by RNAi knockdown experiment and treatment of catalase inhibitor.

  2. Reviews

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Experimental approaches to identify small RNAs and their diverse roles in bacteria – what we have learnt in one decade of MicA research

      Sandra Van Puyvelde, Jozef Vanderleyden and Sigrid C. J. De Keersmaecker

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.263

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Small RNAs constitute a class of bacterial regulators acting at the post-transcriptional level and are receiving increased attention due to their involvement in a number of phenotypes. In this review experimental approaches employed in small RNA research are summarized, that is, identification and conservation analyses, the quest for mRNA targets and their corresponding biological functions, as well as the elucidation of structural properties, using the well-studied small RNA MicA as a model.

  3. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Lactobacillus fermentum AGR1487 cell surface structures and supernatant increase paracellular permeability through different pathways

      Ranjita Sengupta, Rachel C. Anderson, Eric Altermann, Warren C. McNabb, Siva Ganesh, Kelly M. Armstrong, Paul J. Moughan and Nicole C. Roy

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.260

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lactobacillus fermentum is commonly found in fermented foods and is generally thought to be harmless. However, L. fermentum AGR1487 dramatically decreases transepithelial electrical resistance, a measure of intestinal barrier integrity. The results of this research show that the cell surface structure of AGR1487 is critical for its negative effect on intestinal epithelial barrier function in vitro, but also provide evidence that secreted compounds play a role.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains B301D and HS191 and insights into intrapathovar traits associated with plant pathogenesis

      Aravind Ravindran, Neha Jalan, Joshua S. Yuan, Nian Wang and Dennis C. Gross

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.261

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The complete genome sequences were generated for the P. syringae pv. syringae strains B301D and HS191, which represent dicot and monocot strains with distinct host specificities. Intrapathovar comparisons of the B301D (6.09 Mb) and HS191 (5.95 Mb plus a 52 kb pCG131 plasmid) genomes to the previously sequenced B728a genome demonstrated that the shared genes encompass about 83% of each genome, and include genes for siderophore biosynthesis, osmotolerance, and extracellular polysaccharide production. Between 7% to 12% of the genes are unique among the genomes, and most of the unique gene regions carry transposons, phage elements, or IS elements associated with horizontal gene transfer.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Scaffold-fused riboregulators for enhanced gene activation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

      Yuta Sakai, Koichi Abe, Saki Nakashima, James J. Ellinger, Stefano Ferri, Koji Sode and Kazunori Ikebukuro

      Article first published online: 10 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.257

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Here, we demonstrated that the scaffold sequence fused to the riboregulators improved their gene regulation ability in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Additionally, to further enhance gene regulation, we expressed an exogenous RNA chaperone protein, which resulted in higher target gene expression.

VIEW

  1. 1 - 11

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION