MicrobiologyOpen

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 1

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited by Pierre Cornelis, Microbial Interactions, VIB Department of Structural Biology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium

Online ISSN: 2045-8827

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  1. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Adaptive responses of Bacillus cereus ATCC14579 cells upon exposure to acid conditions involve ATPase activity to maintain their internal pH

      Khadidja Senouci-Rezkallah, Michel P. Jobin and Philippe Schmitt

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.239

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      Bacillus cereus is able to induce acid tolerance response. ATPase activity is induced and activated in cells grown at low pH. Internal pH was maintained in cells grown at low pH.

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      Dynamics of marine bacterial community diversity of the coastal waters of the reefs, inlets, and wastewater outfalls of southeast Florida

      Alexandra M. Campbell, Jay Fleisher, Christopher Sinigalliano, James R. White and Jose V. Lopez

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.245

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      The bacterioplankton communities associated with coastal seawater habitats adjacent to populated Broward County, FL, have now been characterized with DNA pyrosequencing. This study has found significant differences between inlets, coral reef, and treated sewage outfalls across a four quarter time span.

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      Molecular basis for the recognition of cyclic-di-AMP by PstA, a PII-like signal transduction protein

      Philip H. Choi, Kamakshi Sureka, Joshua J. Woodward and Liang Tong

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.243

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      Crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes PstA in complex with cyclic-di-AMP.

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      Comparative genomic analysis of seven Mycoplasma hyosynoviae strains

      Eric A. Bumgardner, Weerayuth Kittichotirat, Roger E. Bumgarner and Paulraj K. Lawrence

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.242

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      The draft genome sequences of the seven NPL strains reported here paint a picture of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae as an opportunistic parasite dependent on its host for numerous nutritional requirements. This is in concordance with other members of the Mycoplasma genus as most Mycoplasma species are heavily dependent on their hosts for fixation of nutrients. However, M. hyosynoviae possesses several unique adaptations that confer a selective advantage for growth in its environmental niche including a large arsenal of ribonucleases, several DNA repair mechanisms, and an enhanced ability to shield itself from damage due to oxidative and heat stressors.

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      Molecular investigation of the radiation resistance of edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005

      Hanène Badri, Pieter Monsieurs, Ilse Coninx, Ruddy Wattiez and Natalie Leys

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.229

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      This study demonstrated for the first time the resistance of the free-floating filamentous and edible cyanobacteria Arthrospira to high doses of gamma rays. Arthrospira cells exposed to ionizing radiation shut down photosynthesis and carbon fixation while protein and DNA damage gets repaired. A clear activation of thiol-based antioxidant systems, such the glutathione, was seen in Arthrospira, a system which is well known for plants but absent in many other radiation resistant bacteria such as Deinococcus. Beyond the response linked to genes with known functions, a novel set of seven conserved proteins of unknown function was identified. They were overexpressed in response to radiation exposure in a dose-dependent manner, providing new interesting targets for the future research.

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      Characterizing the diversity of active bacteria in soil by comprehensive stable isotope probing of DNA and RNA with H218O

      Elizabeth A. Rettedal and Volker S. Brözel

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.230

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      Use of stable isotope probing (SIP) can help identify active bacterial members of a community by labeling and separation of nucleic acids with heavy isotopes. Results from SIP of a soil community using H218O suggests that it may be successfully used as a universal label for capture of active DNA and RNA synthesis in entire bacterial communities. The analysis also indicated that total and active members of the same type of nucleic acid represented similar community structures, while DNA and RNA-derived community structures were dissimilar.

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      Microbial diversity and abundance in the Xinjiang Luliang long-term water-flooding petroleum reservoir

      Peike Gao, Huimei Tian, Guoqiang Li, Hongwen Sun and Ting Ma

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.241

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      Microbial populations associated with microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) and their abundance in the Xinjiang Luliang water-flooding petroleum reservoir were investigated by 16S rRNA, nitrate reductases, dissimilatory sulfate reductase, and methyl coenzyme-M reductase-encoded genes to provide ecology information for potential application of MEOR. Our results imply that the Luliang reservoir breeds abundant microbial populations associated with oil recovery, and suggest that this reservoir has potential for MEOR.

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      Functional chimeras of flagellar stator proteins between E. coli MotB and Vibrio PomB at the periplasmic region in Vibrio or E. coli

      Yuuki Nishino, Yasuhiro Onoue, Seiji Kojima and Michio Homma

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.240

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      We constructed chimeric proteins between PomB and MotB with various chimeric junctions at the periplasmic region. All the chimeras are functional in either Escherichia coli or Vibrio and either with or without T ring though the motilities were very weak in E. coli.

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      A new regulatory mechanism for bacterial lipoic acid synthesis

      Huimin Zhang, Qixia Luo, Haichun Gao and Youjun Feng

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.237

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      Biotin and lipoic acid are both sulfur-containing fatty acid derivatives and act as enzyme cofactors required for central metabolism in three domains of life. Unlike the fact that the regulation of bacterial biotin metabolism has been extensively investigated, the knowledge about genetic control of lipoic acid synthesis remains missing or lagged in the past 60 years since its discovery. Through revisiting this long-term unanswered fundamental question, here we report integrative evidence that bacterial cAMP-dependent signaling is linked to lipoic acid synthesis in Shewanella species, the certain of unique marine-borne bacteria with special ability of metal reduction. Definitely, it is a breakthrough finding and represents a first paradigm for genetic control of lipoic acid synthesis.

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      The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

      Anubrata Ghosal, Bimal Babu Upadhyaya, Joëlle V. Fritz, Anna Heintz-Buschart, Mahesh S. Desai, Dilmurat Yusuf, David Huang, Aidos Baumuratov, Kai Wang, David Galas and Paul Wilmes

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.235

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      Analogous to eukaryotic cells, the enteric bacterium Escherichia coli releases RNA into its extracellular medium through shedding of outer membrane vesicles in addition to the likely involvement of secretory pathways.

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      Pyrosequencing analysis of a bacterial community associated with lava-formed soil from the Gotjawal forest in Jeju, Korea

      Jong-Shik Kim, Keun Chul Lee, Dae-Shin Kim, Suk-Hyung Ko, Man-Young Jung, Sung-Keun Rhee and Jung-Sook Lee

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.238

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      In this study, we analyzed the bacterial diversity in soils collected from Gotjawal forest, where globally unique topography, geology, and ecological features support a forest grown on basalt flows from 110,000 to 120,000 years ago and 40,000 to 50,000 years ago. Results from 454-pyrosequencing revealed 12,621 operational taxonomic units at 3% dissimilarity, distributed among the following groups: Proteobacteria (56.2%) with 45.7% of α-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria (25%), Acidobacteria (10.9%), Chloroflexi (2.4%), and Bacteroidetes (0.9%).

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      Remodeling of host phosphatidylcholine by Chlamydia acyltransferase is regulated by acyl-CoA binding protein ACBD6 associated with lipid droplets

      Eric Soupene, Derek Wang and Frans A. Kuypers

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.234

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      In human Chlamydia-infected cells, host lipids are scavenged and modified into bacterial-specific lipids by the action of a shared human-bacterial acylation mechanism. The lipid droplet-mediated transfer of human acyl-CoA carrier ACBD6 into the parasitophorous vacuole is needed to buffer the lumen concentration of acyl-CoAs and sustains the activity of the bacterial acyltransferase CT775.

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      Biodiversity hot spot on a hot spot: novel extremophile diversity in Hawaiian fumaroles

      Kate Wall, Jennifer Cornell, Richard W. Bizzoco and Scott T. Kelley

      Article first published online: 6 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.236

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      Fumaroles (steam vents) are the most common, yet least understood, microbial habitat in terrestrial geothermal settings. In this study, we applied culture-independent molecular methods to explore fumarole deposit microbial assemblages in fifteen different fumaroles in four geographic locations on the Big Island of Hawaii. Our results suggest that fumarole deposits function as an “extremophile collector” and may be hot a spot of novel extremophile biodiversity.

    14. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The Aeromonas caviae AHA0618 gene modulates cell length and influences swimming and swarming motility

      Rebecca C. Lowry, Jennifer L. Parker, Ramhari Kumbhar, Stephane Mesnage, Jonathan G. Shaw and Graham P. Stafford

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.233

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      Mutation of the AHA0618 gene in Aeromonas caviae caused an increase in motility. Similar to the mutation of a putative deglycosylation gene from Helicobacter pylori. However, in A. caviae there appeared to be an effect on flagellin glycosylation, but a small change in cell size was observed.

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