Food and Energy Security

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 3

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Professor Martin Parry, Rothamsted Research

Online ISSN: 2048-3694

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  1. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The effect of aboveground biomass removal on soil macronutrient over time in Munesa Shashemane, Ethiopia

      Aklilu Bajigo Madalcho

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/fes3.77

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      Total harvest of the biomass in the continues farmlands, would result in loss of macronutrients. Total removal of the aboveground biomass under tree plantation stands may also result in the loss of soil macronutrients, which in turn result in land degradation. Especially, the leaves of the plantation trees contain higher concentration of macronutrients, and returning this part will lead to land restoration and soil macronutrient improvement.

  2. Reviews

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      Crop biotechnology: a pivotal moment for global acceptance

      Eric Hallerman and Elizabeth Grabau

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/fes3.76

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      The development of GE crops offers the potential for many important contributions to food security but has become mired in controversy. Public misconception and regulatory inaction have contributed to delays in realizing the benefits of GE crops for food security, human well-being, and ecological sustainability.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A new emphasis on root traits for perennial grass and legume varieties with environmental and ecological benefits

      Athole H. Marshall, Rosemary P. Collins, Mike W. Humphreys and John Scullion

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/fes3.78

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      We review current knowledge on the role of grassland ecosystems in delivering ecological and environmental benefits in comparison with arable ecosystems. We will consider how improved grassland (grasslands less than five years old) can deliver these benefits and the potential opportunities for plant breeding to improve specific traits that will enhance these benefits whilst maintaining forage production for livestock consumption.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Genetics-based dynamic systems model of canopy photosynthesis: the key to improve light and resource use efficiencies for crops

      Qingfeng Song, Chengcai Chu, Martin A. J. Parry and Xin-Guang Zhu

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/fes3.74

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mechanistic dynamic systems models of canopy photosynthesis are now available which can be used to design the optimal canopy architectural and physiological parameters to maximize CO2 uptake. Rapid development of modern crop genetics research now makes it possible to link such canopy models with genetic variations of crops to develop genetics-based dynamic systems models of canopy photosynthesis. Such models can guide marker-assisted breeding or genomic selection or engineering of crops to enhance light and nitrogen use efficiencies for different region under future climate change scenarios.

  3. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Design and characterization of spatial units for monitoring global impacts of environmental factors on major crops and food security

      René Gommes, Bingfang Wu, Zhongyuan Li and Hongwei Zeng

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/fes3.73

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sixty-five monitoring and reporting units (MRU) were designed for monitoring the impact of agroclimatic factors on crops at the global scale. The current distribution of major food crops fits well into the ecologically defined MRUs. Issues related to variability among MRUs and spatial variability/inhomogenity inside MRUs are discussed. Variability in agriculture exceeds environmental variability and ecologically defined cropping zones can be used as agricultural vulnerability zones.

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