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Regeneration

Each article is made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 2

Edited By: Susan V. Bryant and Enrique Amaya

Online ISSN: 2052-4412

Highlights

  • SHORT COMMUNICATION: TALEN-mediated gene editing of the thrombospondin-1 locus in axolotl

    SHORT COMMUNICATION: TALEN‐mediated gene editing of the thrombospondin‐1 locus in axolotl

    TALEN-targeted animals show increased macrophage and monocyte infiltration in regenerating limbs and decreased stump collagen deposition. NSE staining was performed to detect monocytes and macrophages in regenerating juvenile limbs at 6 days post-amputation. (A) Wild-type sibling control. (B) TALEN-targeted tsp-1 deletion animal. (C) The quantification of NSE positive cells (A, B, black) within the blastema mesenchyme were quantified (N = 14, 6, 16 limbs for wt, TAL1 and TAL2 respectively). (D), (E) Subepidermal collagen thickness was measured (yellow double arrow) in control and TALEN-targeted stumps, and quantified in (F) (N = 14 controls; 6 TAL1; 16 TAL2). Scale bars in all images are 50 μm; *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01; error bars indicate SEM.

  • REASEARCH ARTICLE: Reintegration of the regenerated and the remaining tissues during joint regeneration in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster

    REASEARCH ARTICLE: Reintegration of the regenerated and the remaining tissues during joint regeneration in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster

    Morphology of the radius and ulna regenerated without interaction with the remaining humerus. (A) 3D image constructed using EFIC image of the regenerated skeletal elements after joint and humerus amputation. The remaining tissues are segmented in pink, and the regenerated tissues are segmented in blue. (B) Whole-mount bone and cartilage staining of the regenerated skeletal elements after joint and humerus amputation. Bones are stained magenta, and cartilage is stained blue. The radius and ulna were regenerated without interacting with the remaining humerus, and in this case the proximal structures of the radius and ulna were not completely regenerated (arrowheads), as shown (C) in a schematic drawing.

  • REVIEW: The axolotl limb blastema: cellular and molecular mechanisms driving blastema formation and limb regeneration in tetrapods

    REVIEW: The axolotl limb blastema: cellular and molecular mechanisms driving blastema formation and limb regeneration in tetrapods

    The pattern-forming grid cells guide the behavior of pattern-following cells. The cells that retain positional memory (dark blue) are located in the connective tissues that line all of the structures in the intact limb. When the limb is amputated, a regeneration-competent environment is generated through nerve−epithelial interactions, which generate the apical epithelial cap (AEC) that dedifferentiates and recruits the grid cells from the tissues in different locations on the limb to accumulate below the AEC and interact (early blastema). The grid cells with differencing positional information (e.g., 4 and 6) induce an intercalary response to generate cells with the missing positional information (i.e., 5). At later stages of development (late blastema), the basal region of the blastema begins differentiating, and the grid cells provide positional cues to guide the behavior of other pattern-following cell types (e.g., muscle, epithelial, and Schwann cells) that do not retain positional memory. At the same time, positional interactions continue to occur in the apical tip of the blastema to generate the pattern of the more distal structures in the regenerate.

  • ORIGINAL ARTICLE: The regeneration blastema of lizards: an amniote model for the study of appendage replacement

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE: The regeneration blastema of lizards: an amniote model for the study of appendage replacement

    Immunofluorescent staining of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and vimentin in the blastema during tail regeneration in the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) (see supplementary methods). PCNA (red) labels cells in the S phase of the cell cycle (most commonly, proliferating cells); vimentin (green) is an intermediate filament characteristic of mesenchymal cells; DAPI (blue) is a nuclear stain. (A), (B) Cells of the blastema are positive for both PCNA and vimentin, while cells of the wound epithelium (separated by a hatched line) in (B) are positive for PCNA only. Vimentin demonstrates a gradient of expression within the blastema, being most abundant towards the apex (C) and diminishing proximally (D). Scale bar 10 μm. bl, blastema; we, wound epithelium.

  • SHORT COMMUNICATION: TALEN‐mediated gene editing of the thrombospondin‐1 locus in axolotl
  • REASEARCH ARTICLE: Reintegration of the regenerated and the remaining tissues during joint regeneration in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster
  • REVIEW: The axolotl limb blastema: cellular and molecular mechanisms driving blastema formation and limb regeneration in tetrapods
  • ORIGINAL ARTICLE: The regeneration blastema of lizards: an amniote model for the study of appendage replacement

Just Published Articles

  1. You have full text access to this Open Access content
    Go ahead, grow a head! A planarian's guide to anterior regeneration

    Suthira Owlarn and Kerstin Bartscherer

    Accepted manuscript online: 30 APR 2016 03:42AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/reg2.56

  2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    Physiological controls of large-scale patterning in planarian regeneration: a molecular and computational perspective on growth and form (pages 78–102)

    Fallon Durant, Daniel Lobo, Jennifer Hammelman and Michael Levin

    Version of Record online: 28 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/reg2.54

  3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    The relationship between growth and pattern formation (pages 103–122)

    Susan V. Bryant and David M. Gardiner

    Version of Record online: 28 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/reg2.55

  4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    Alternative flow cytometry strategies to analyze stem cells and cell death in planarians (pages 123–135)

    Tanuja Harshani Peiris, Marcos E. García-Ojeda and Néstor J. Oviedo

    Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/reg2.53

  5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    Planarian brain regeneration as a model system for developmental neurotoxicology (pages 65–77)

    Danielle Hagstrom, Olivier Cochet-Escartin and Eva-Maria S. Collins

    Version of Record online: 15 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/reg2.52

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Regeneration is the first and only world-class journal dedicated to regeneration and tissue repair. In the past few decades, we have learned much about the mechanisms underpinning the remarkable capacities of some organisms to repair and regenerate their tissues following injury. Against the backdrop of basic research in developmental biology, and in conjunction with the ascendancy of stem cell biology, the time is ripe to explore the next frontier: natural and assisted healing and regeneration.

Regeneration is a peer-reviewed, open access journal that aims to provide the first dedicated venue for research related to repair and regeneration in its many forms, and in all relevant species.

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  • Immediately open access, freely available to read, download and share
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