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Regeneration

Each article is made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Cover image for Vol. 4 Issue 4

Edited By: Susan V. Bryant and Enrique Amaya

Online ISSN: 2052-4412

Highlights

  • SHORT COMMUNICATION: TALEN-mediated gene editing of the thrombospondin-1 locus in axolotl

    SHORT COMMUNICATION: TALEN‐mediated gene editing of the thrombospondin‐1 locus in axolotl

    TALEN-targeted animals show increased macrophage and monocyte infiltration in regenerating limbs and decreased stump collagen deposition. NSE staining was performed to detect monocytes and macrophages in regenerating juvenile limbs at 6 days post-amputation. (A) Wild-type sibling control. (B) TALEN-targeted tsp-1 deletion animal. (C) The quantification of NSE positive cells (A, B, black) within the blastema mesenchyme were quantified (N = 14, 6, 16 limbs for wt, TAL1 and TAL2 respectively). (D), (E) Subepidermal collagen thickness was measured (yellow double arrow) in control and TALEN-targeted stumps, and quantified in (F) (N = 14 controls; 6 TAL1; 16 TAL2). Scale bars in all images are 50 μm; *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01; error bars indicate SEM.

  • REASEARCH ARTICLE: Reintegration of the regenerated and the remaining tissues during joint regeneration in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster

    REASEARCH ARTICLE: Reintegration of the regenerated and the remaining tissues during joint regeneration in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster

    Morphology of the radius and ulna regenerated without interaction with the remaining humerus. (A) 3D image constructed using EFIC image of the regenerated skeletal elements after joint and humerus amputation. The remaining tissues are segmented in pink, and the regenerated tissues are segmented in blue. (B) Whole-mount bone and cartilage staining of the regenerated skeletal elements after joint and humerus amputation. Bones are stained magenta, and cartilage is stained blue. The radius and ulna were regenerated without interacting with the remaining humerus, and in this case the proximal structures of the radius and ulna were not completely regenerated (arrowheads), as shown (C) in a schematic drawing.

  • REVIEW: The axolotl limb blastema: cellular and molecular mechanisms driving blastema formation and limb regeneration in tetrapods

    REVIEW: The axolotl limb blastema: cellular and molecular mechanisms driving blastema formation and limb regeneration in tetrapods

    The pattern-forming grid cells guide the behavior of pattern-following cells. The cells that retain positional memory (dark blue) are located in the connective tissues that line all of the structures in the intact limb. When the limb is amputated, a regeneration-competent environment is generated through nerve−epithelial interactions, which generate the apical epithelial cap (AEC) that dedifferentiates and recruits the grid cells from the tissues in different locations on the limb to accumulate below the AEC and interact (early blastema). The grid cells with differencing positional information (e.g., 4 and 6) induce an intercalary response to generate cells with the missing positional information (i.e., 5). At later stages of development (late blastema), the basal region of the blastema begins differentiating, and the grid cells provide positional cues to guide the behavior of other pattern-following cell types (e.g., muscle, epithelial, and Schwann cells) that do not retain positional memory. At the same time, positional interactions continue to occur in the apical tip of the blastema to generate the pattern of the more distal structures in the regenerate.

  • ORIGINAL ARTICLE: The regeneration blastema of lizards: an amniote model for the study of appendage replacement

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE: The regeneration blastema of lizards: an amniote model for the study of appendage replacement

    Immunofluorescent staining of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and vimentin in the blastema during tail regeneration in the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) (see supplementary methods). PCNA (red) labels cells in the S phase of the cell cycle (most commonly, proliferating cells); vimentin (green) is an intermediate filament characteristic of mesenchymal cells; DAPI (blue) is a nuclear stain. (A), (B) Cells of the blastema are positive for both PCNA and vimentin, while cells of the wound epithelium (separated by a hatched line) in (B) are positive for PCNA only. Vimentin demonstrates a gradient of expression within the blastema, being most abundant towards the apex (C) and diminishing proximally (D). Scale bar 10 μm. bl, blastema; we, wound epithelium.

  • SHORT COMMUNICATION: TALEN‐mediated gene editing of the thrombospondin‐1 locus in axolotl
  • REASEARCH ARTICLE: Reintegration of the regenerated and the remaining tissues during joint regeneration in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster
  • REVIEW: The axolotl limb blastema: cellular and molecular mechanisms driving blastema formation and limb regeneration in tetrapods
  • ORIGINAL ARTICLE: The regeneration blastema of lizards: an amniote model for the study of appendage replacement

Recently Published Issues

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Now closed for new submissions

Regeneration is now closed for new submissions as of the 1st February 2018. The journal will then be fully closed once the last issue is published, although all published content will remain to be hosted in perpetuity on Wiley Online Library.

Recently Published Articles

  1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    High throughput measurement of metabolism in planarians reveals activation of glycolysis during regeneration

    Edie A. Osuma, Daniel W. Riggs, Andrew A. Gibb and Bradford G. Hill

    Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2018 | DOI: 10.1002/reg2.95

    Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

    Osuma et al. standardized a method to measure mitochondrial and glycolytic metabolism in live planarians. Using this method, the authors found that planarian regeneration is associated with an activation of glycolysis. This method should be useful to investigators with an interest in the role of metabolism in planarian biology.

  2. You have full text access to this Open Access content
    The diversity of myeloid immune cells shaping wound repair and fibrosis in the lung

    Laura Florez-Sampedro, Shanshan Song and Barbro N. Melgert

    Accepted manuscript online: 4 JAN 2018 01:50AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/reg2.97

  3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    Mechanisms of urodele limb regeneration (pages 159–200)

    David L. Stocum

    Version of Record online: 26 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/reg2.92

    Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

    Limb regeneration in urodeles occurs by the formation of a blastema that is a product of tissue histolysis by proteolytic enzymes, factors released by macrophages, and lineage-restricted contributions of resident progenitor cells and progenitors produced by dedifferentiation. Blastema growth is a complex process requiring nerve and apical epidermal factors, and an interaction of cells from disparate positions on the circumference of the limb, all of which are required for mitosis. The result of these processes, which are not yet well understood, is the progressive distalization of blastemal positional identities to complete the proximodistal (PD) pattern. Several mechanisms, illustrated in the Figure, have been proposed for distalization. (A) Polar coordinate model. Top, planar representation of the amputation surface. Concentric circles labeled A-E represent the PD positional identities generated by successive reiterations of centripetal migration and interaction. Numbers represent angular values. Bottom, conical representation represents all the PD identities generated by distalization. (B) “Bootstrap” model. An AEC factor (green) that increases morphogen levels (red) in a proximal to distal direction to generate progressively more distal PD identities. AB = accumulation blastema, MB = medium bud; LB = late bud; D = digits. (C) Timing mechanism. Regeneration of the segment of amputation (distal stylopodium, red), driven by a high level of retinoic acid (red arrow) that drops off distally to interact with a mitotic timing mechanism to specify remaining PD positional identities. (D) Intercalary averaging mechanism. Missing PD identities represented as A-E. The first step is intercalation of the intermediate positional identity; successive intercalations complete the PD sequence.

  4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    Limb regeneration in a direct-developing terrestrial salamander, Bolitoglossa ramosi (Caudata: Plethodontidae) : Limb regeneration in plethodontid salamanders (pages 227–235)

    Claudia Marcela Arenas Gómez, Andrea Gómez Molina, Juliana D. Zapata and Jean Paul Delgado

    Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/reg2.93

    Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

    Limb regeneration process in Bolitoglossa ramosi, a direct-developing terrestrial salamander of the plethodontid family, follow the previous described process for axolotls and newts, but limb regeneration in this species is considerably slower than in axolotls and newts and some histological difference were observed in B. ramosi.

  5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    Investigation into the cellular origins of posterior regeneration in the annelid Capitella teleta

    Danielle M. de Jong and Elaine C. Seaver

    Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/reg2.94

    Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

    The source, behavior and molecular characteristics of cells that form new tissue during posterior regeneration in the annelid Capitella teleta are largely unknown. We show that cell migration occurs during C. teleta regeneration. We hypothesize that cells originate from a multipotent progenitor cell (MPC) cluster, migrate posteriorly, and contribute to new tissue. We demonstrate that the capacity for regeneration is greater with than without the MPC cluster. Finally, we propose a working model of posterior regeneration in C. teleta.

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