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Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation

Each article is made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 4

Edited By: Dr. Nathalie Pettorelli

Online ISSN: 2056-3485

Associated Title(s): Animal Conservation, International Zoo Yearbook, Journal of Zoology

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Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation is a new, fully open access journal from Wiley and the Zoological Society of London. The journal will provide a forum for the rapid publication of peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary research from the interface between remote sensing science and ecology and conservation. The journal defines remote sensing in its broadest sense, including data acquisition by hand-held and fixed ground-based sensors, such as camera traps and acoustic recorders, and sensors on airplanes and satellites. The journal's intended audience includes ecologists, conservation scientists, policy makers, managers of terrestrial and aquatic systems, remote sensing scientists, and students.

Good news:Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation is now indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)!

Read the Editorial: 'A new platform to support research at the interface of remote sensing, ecology and conservation'


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Reasons to publish in Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation:

• high standard, rigorous peer review

• immediate open access

• articles published under Creative Commons Licenses

• articles can be enhanced by integrated hosting of multimedia and data content

• fully compliant with all open access mandates

Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation provides an automatic waiver or discount to lead authors based in countries on this list.

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Special Issues - Call for Content

PhotosCar

New Approaches to Citizen Science
For centuries amateur naturalists have contributed to science; for example, by recording the distribution of species. However, in recent decades, advances in technology have revolutionised "citizen science" and far more people are involved in different ways than was historically the case. We invite high-quality contributions about citizen science to a special issue of Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation. The aim is to demonstrate the diversity of citizen science, in terms of approach and research themes, and the contributions of remote-sensing techniques. We are particularly interested in innovative research that identifies the intersection between remote sensing and citizen science for conservation, such as DIY balloon or kite mapping, the use of photo-sharing apps and the integration of satellite observations with ground truth by volunteers. Papers that reveal how citizen science and remote sensing can be used to monitor Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) are also welcome. The main objective is to describe the breadth and depth of engagement that is now possible using different approaches to citizen science. High-quality submissions for this special issue will be considered on a case-to-case basis for a full fee waiver, where authors are unable to pay the Article Processing Fees.
Submission deadline 15 July 2017.

UAV in Myanmar

Remotely Piloted Aircraft System Applications in Conservation and Ecology
Remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) are increasingly being used to conduct remote sensing research and applications largely due to improvements in technology, price reductions, and new rules and regulations. This special issue aims to illustrate the breadth of avenues for RPAS to inform ecology and conservation. We are particularly interested in novel applications of RPAS, and articles discussing how small (25 Kg) RPA are being used now and will be used in the foreseeable future as a remote sensing platform for ecological research and conservation applications. The goal is to raise awareness among students and professionals and to demonstrate the responsible use of RPAS. High quality submissions for this special issue will be considered on a case-to-case basis for a full fee waiver, where authors are unable to pay the Article Processing Fees.
Submission deadline 15 March 2017.

Novel Remote Sensing Approaches to Climate Change Research

Novel Remote Sensing Approaches to Climate Change Research
Climate change is increasingly recognized as a major risk to global biodiversity, potentially affecting a huge range of species and ecosystems and putting livelihoods at risk. Remote sensing techniques provide a formidable opportunity to further our understanding of the direct and indirect impacts of changing climatic conditions on wildlife, and inform the management of data deficient areas. This special issue invites perspectives and research papers that specifically focus on novel applications of remote sensing for climate change research, using e.g. new sensors, new methods, and/or interdisciplinary approaches to expand current ecological knowledge and/or help design effective mitigation/adaptation strategies. High quality submissions for this special issue will be considered on a case-to-case basis for a full fee waiver, where authors are unable to pay the Article Processing Fees. Enquiries about potential submissions should be directed to RSEC.admin@zsl.org

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