Brain and Behavior

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 11

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Maryann Martone, University of California, San Diego, USA

Impact Factor: 2.128

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 31/51 (Behavioral Sciences); 167/256 (Neurosciences)

Online ISSN: 2162-3279

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  1. 1 - 39
  1. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Childhood maltreatment, psychopathology, and the development of hippocampal subregions during adolescence

      Sarah Whittle, Julian G. Simmons, Sylke Hendriksma, Nandita Vijayakumar, Michelle L. Byrne, Meg Dennison and Nicholas B. Allen

      Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.607

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      This study investigated whether childhood maltreatment and psychopathology were associated with the development of hippocampal subregion volumes from early to late adolescence. Childhood maltreatment, and both early and late onset psychopathology, were associated with altered development of different hippocampal subregions. Our results highlight the importance of considering development in research examining associations between stress, mental illness, and hippocampal morphology.

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      Secondary prophylactic treatment and long-term prognosis after TIA and different subtypes of stroke. A 25-year follow-up hospital-based observational study

      Sven-Erik Eriksson

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.603

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      Long-term prognosis after TIA and different subtypes of stroke including secondary prophylactic treatment.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Psychometric properties of a Norwegian adaption of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 in a sample of Parkinson patients, headache patients, and controls

      Jonas C. Lindstrøm, Nora G. Wyller, Marianne M. Halvorsen, Silje Hartberg and Christofer Lundqvist

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.605

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      The BIS-11 scale was translated into Norwegian and a sample of Parkinson's disease and headache patients was surveyed in addition to a group of healthy subjects. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were done for a single-factor model, the original BIS-11 three-factor model and a two-factor model.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Increased thalamic centrality and putamen–thalamic connectivity in patients with parkinsonian resting tremor

      Quanquan Gu, Hengyi Cao, Min Xuan, Wei Luo, Xiaojun Guan, Jingjing Xu, Peiyu Huang, Minming Zhang and Xiaojun Xu

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.601

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      The thalamus serves as a functionally central hub affecting the generation of resting tremor in Parkinson's disease, and the altered thalamic centrality correlates to parkinsonian tremor severity. Compared with the healthy controls, the modular structure of the thalamus in patients with parkinsonian resting tremor is more extensively linked to regions covering the cerebello-thalamic-motor cortical (CRB-THA-MC) loop. The putamen–thalamic functional connectivity is enhanced in patients with parkinsonian resting tremor may be responsible for the aberrant interactions between the CRB-THA-MC loop and the basal ganglia in resting tremor.

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      Aberrant neural networks for the recognition memory of socially relevant information in patients with schizophrenia

      Jooyoung Oh, Ji-Won Chun, Eunseong Kim, Hae-Jeong Park, Boreom Lee and Jae-Jin Kim

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.602

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      In this study, we aimed to elucidate the dysfunctional brain networks in patients with schizophrenia while they were recognizing socially relevant information using an old–new recognition task. We found that patients exhibited significantly decreased connectivity in the frontopolar and language comprehension networks compared to controls, suggesting that those networks could be potential therapeutic targets in patients with schizophrenia.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Topographic separation of fornical fibers associated with the anterior and posterior hippocampus in the human brain: An MRI-diffusion study

      Kat Christiansen, Claudia Metzler-Baddeley, Greg D. Parker, Nils Muhlert, Derek K. Jones, John P. Aggleton and Seralynne D. Vann

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.604

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      Diffusion MR imaging was used to reconstruct the fornix according to connections with the anterior and posterior hippocampus. A clear distinction with anterior hippocampal fibers located laterally within the fornix and posterior hippocampal fibers located medial was found, consistent with what is currently known about fornix topography in the nonhuman primate. Our method provides a novel way to investigate functional dissociations along the long axis of the hippocampus.

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      Severe carotid artery stenosis evaluated by ultrasound is associated with post stroke vascular cognitive impairment

      Xuefeng Li, Xiangling Ma, Jing Lin, Xiangqin He, Feng Tian and Dongmei Kong

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.606

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      In conclusion, we demonstrated that high-grade carotid artery stenosis was associated with post stroke cognitive dysfunction in patients with acute ischemic stroke and this relationship persisted even after adjusting for potential confounders.

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      The lack of association between angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and nicotine dependence in multiple sclerosis

      Sergej Nadalin, Alena Buretić-Tomljanović, Polona Lavtar, Nada Starčević Čizmarević, Alenka Hodžić, Juraj Sepčić, Miljenko Kapović, Borut Peterlin and Smiljana Ristić

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.600

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      Although the detrimental effects of smoking in multiple sclerosis (MS) are well established and genetics has been proposed to play a substantial role in vulnerability to smoking, no studies have elucidated the etiology of nicotine dependence in MS. Several lines of evidence suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), beyond its classical role of mediating blood pressure regulation, might contribute to the etiology of substance addictions by influencing dopaminergic signaling. We investigated whether the functional insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene, which has previously proved to be relevant in both nicotine dependence and MS, might be associated with smoking behavior among 521 Croatian and Slovenian patients with MS. Our results indicate that the ACE-I/D polymorphism does not contribute to the risk of developing nicotine dependence or to smoking severity among MS patients. Furthermore, in the context of reports on the ACE-I/D polymorphism and nicotine dependence among healthy controls and patients with depression, the mechanism by which this polymorphism influences nicotine dependence risk may differ in MS compared to depression, although possibly not compared to a healthy population

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Dalfampridine effects on cognition, fatigue, and dexterity

      Melanie Korsen, Rhina Kunz, Ulf Schminke, Uwe Runge, Thomas Kohlmann and Alexander Dressel

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.559

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      Dalfampridine improves walking ability in a subset of MS patients. Our study provides evidence that dalfampridine may also exert beneficial effects on other neurological functions such as cognition, depression, and fatigue. These effects were not limited to patients who responded to dalfampridine with improved mobility measures.

    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      “Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are usually nice persons”—How physicians experienced in ALS see the personality characteristics of their patients

      Theresa Mehl, Berit Jordan and Stephan Zierz

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.599

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      The main objective was to analyze the personality structure of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients assessed by experienced physicians. The reason for this investigation was the predominant anecdotal descriptions of these patients as very “nice” and “warm” persons compared to other patient groups. As a main result, we showed that there is a similar personality characteristic common to patients with ALS that differentiate them from other patient groups. This personality dimension is quite similar to the concept of “niceness”.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Effects of preoperative statin use on perioperative outcomes of carotid endarterectomy

      Enzo Ballotta, Antonio Toniato, Filippo Farina and Claudio Baracchini

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.597

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      Recent reports have shown that the preoperative use of statins has a protective role after noncardiac vascular and cardiac surgery, attenuating the perioperative incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction, and death. Only few studies, however, have investigated on the benefit of statin use in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy for severe carotid disease, reporting variable results. Findings from our study show that taking statins prior to carotid endarterectomy did not seem to affect the risk of major perioperative ischemic events and death, most likely due to the extremely low overall incidence of perioperative complications.

    12. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Lentiviral vector-encoded microRNA-based shRNA-mediated gene knockdown of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in skin reduces pain

      Chien-Cheng Liu, Jiin-Tsuey Cheng, Kuo-Chuan Hung, Yuan-Yi Chia and Ping-Heng Tan

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.587

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      RNA polymerase II promoters expressing rationally designed primary microRNA-based shRNA, for example, shRNAmir, can produce more potent gene knockdown than RNA polymerase III does. Peripheral administration of the vector-encoding NR1 shRNAmir offers a fast and potent therapy for persistent inflammatory pain with no motor function impairment.

    13. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Interhemispheric characterization of small vessel disease imaging markers after subcortical infarct

      Maria del C. Valdés Hernández, Xinyi Qiu, Xin Wang, Stewart Wiseman, Eleni Sakka, Lucy C. Maconick, Fergus Doubal, Cathie L. M. Sudlow and Joanna M. Wardlaw

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.595

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      We report the spatial distribution and prevalence of small vessel disease imaging markers with respect to the location of the recent subcortical infarct on 187 patients who had an acute ischemic stroke clinical syndrome and a relevant DWI-positive lesion. The MRI scan was obtained in the interval between stroke onset and 4 weeks after. There was no difference in median percent volume of the right RSSIs versus left (p = .16). Neither was there a significant interhemispheric difference in the volume of any of the markers regardless of the location of the infarct and they were equally distributed in both hemispheres.

    14. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Serum uric acid levels in Parkinson's disease and related disorders

      Hideki Sakuta, Keisuke Suzuki, Tomoyuki Miyamoto, Masayuki Miyamoto, Ayaka Numao, Hiroaki Fujita, Yuji Watanabe and Koichi Hirata

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.598

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      Serum uric acid (UA) levels were significantly lower in patients with PD, MSA, and PSP compared with controls in men. Serum UA levels were significantly decreased in tauopathy group (PSP patients) compared with synucleinopathy group. Significant correlations were found between serum UA levels and disease severity in MSA and PSP patients, but not in PD patients.

    15. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      High-angular resolution diffusion imaging tractography of cerebellar pathways from newborns to young adults

      Thomas J. Re, Jacob Levman, Ashley R. Lim, Andrea Righini, Patricia Ellen Grant and Emi Takahashi

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.589

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      This work demonstrates the usefulness of HARDI tractography for studying the normal development of the cerebellar peduncle pathways in a pediatric population. We showed that it is possible to distinguish in vivo two subpathways of the middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP), the motor component (MCPmot) and the higher cognitive function component (MCPcog) at all ages even in the premature newborn.

    16. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Preliminary fMRI findings concerning the influence of 5-HTP on food selection

      Stephanos Ioannou and Adrian L. Williams

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.594

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      The influence of 5-HTP in response to food aids the activation of brain regions responsible for the correct appraisal of nutrient selection. The brain's activity is altered by macronutrients rich or deprived in the body. By reading the organisms’ physiological states and combining them with memory experiences, it constructs behavioral strategies steering an individual toward or in opposition to a particular food.

    17. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Fiber up-sampling and quality assessment of tractograms – towards quantitative brain connectivity

      Stefan Sommer, Sebastian Kozerke, Erich Seifritz and Philipp Staempfli

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.588

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      We propose an approach which enables the inspection of the quality of a tractogram optimization by evaluating the residual error signal. Scalar and directionally dependent metrics are introduced and evaluated along segmented tractography fiber bundles, in order to investigate the goodness of fit of the tractography optimization. Furthermore, we also present an additional up-sampling procedure to increase the number of streamlines of a given fiber population prior to the optimization.

    18. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Chemotherapy-induced neuropathies—a growing problem for patients and health care providers

      Marta Banach, Judyta K. Juranek and Aneta L. Zygulska

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.558

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      Chemotherapy-induced neuropathies are one of the most common side effects of the cancer treatment, surpassing bone marrow suppression and kidney dysfunctions. Chemotherapeutics exerting neurotoxic effects on peripheral nervous system are often the ones that are also the most commonly used, often listed as a standard, routine medication for most common types of cancer. Here, we review the most common neuropathy-inducing anti-cancer drugs and outline preventive measures and treatment recommendations for cancer patients and their care givers.

    19. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Traumatic brain injury among female offenders in a prison population: results of the FleuryTBI study

      Eric Durand, Laurence Watier, Anne Lécu, Michel Fix, Jean-Jacques Weiss, Mathilde Chevignard and Pascale Pradat-Diehl

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.535

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      The study was designed to estimate the prevalence of TBI in a French prison population of female offenders. The rate of self-reported TBI was high, with a prevalence of 21% and the first cause of TBI was violence related.

    20. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Elevated cerebrospinal fluid uric acid during relapse of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders

      Yaqing Shu, Haiyan Li, Lei Zhang, Yuge Wang, Youming Long, Rui Li, Wei Qiu, Zhengqi Lu, Xueqiang Hu and Fuhua Peng

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.584

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      Cerebrospinal fluid UA levels were elevated in patients with NMOSDs during relapse, and were likely modified by serum UA and blood–brain barrier integrity.

    21. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Side-of-onset of Parkinson's disease in relation to neuropsychological measures

      Edward J. Modestino, Chioma Amenechi, AnnaMarie Reinhofer and Patrick O'Toole

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.590

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      Clear differences between LOPD and ROPD were found within our cohort. Most of these findings are indeed consistent with previous research about side-of-onset in relation to cognitive, neuropsychological, and clinical differences.

    22. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Different mechanosensory stimulations of the lower back elicit specific changes in hemodynamics and oxygenation in cortical sensorimotor areas—A fNIRS study

      Andrea Vrana, Michael L. Meier, Sabina Hotz-Boendermaker, Barry K. Humphreys and Felix Scholkmann

      Version of Record online: 14 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.575

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      This study investigated cortical hemodynamic and oxygenation changes in sensorimotor areas after painful and non-painful mechanosensory stimulation applied on the lower back using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Results showed that fNIRS is sensitive enough to detect varying hemodynamic responses to different types of mechanosensory stimulation.

    23. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Cognition, depression, fatigue, and quality of life in primary Sjögren's syndrome: correlations

      Belgin Koçer, Mehmet Engin Tezcan, Hale Zeynep Batur, Şeminur Haznedaroğlu, Berna Göker, Ceyla İrkeç and Rümeysa Çetinkaya

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.586

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      Clock drawing, PASAT, and AVLT are very useful tests to determine the subclinical and clinical cognitive dysfunction to evaluate attention, information processing speed, executive functions, and short-term and long-term memory in PSS patients.

    24. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Assessment of feigned cognitive impairment in severe traumatic brain injury patients with the Forced-choice Graphics Memory Test

      Zilong Liu, Juan Dong, Xiaohong Zhao, Xiaorui Chen, Sara M. Lippa, Jerome S. Caroselli and Xiang Fang

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.593

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      The Forced-choice Graphics Memory Test (FGMT) is a newly developed measure, based on binomial theorem, to assess feigned cognitive impairment. This study indicated that the FGMT can be used as a fast and reliable tool for identification of feigned cognitive impairment in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    25. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Prevalence of progressive supranuclear palsy in Yonago: change throughout a decade

      Hiroshi Takigawa, Michio Kitayama, Kenji Wada-Isoe, Hisanori Kowa and Kenji Nakashima

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.557

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      The prevalence of progressive supranuclear palsy and Richardson's syndrome.

    26. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Effects of isoflurane anesthesia on resting-state fMRI signals and functional connectivity within primary somatosensory cortex of monkeys

      Tung-Lin Wu, Arabinda Mishra, Feng Wang, Pai-Feng Yang, John C. Gore and Li Min Chen

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.591

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      The goals of this study are to determine (1) the general effects of isoflurane on rsfMRI signals in the S1 circuit and (2) whether the effects are functional- and regional-dependent, by quantifying the relationships between isoflurane levels, power and inter-regional correlation coefficients in digit and face regions of distinct S1 subregions. Our findings demonstrate that isoflurane induced similar dose-dependent suppressive effects on the power of rsfMRI signals and local fine-scale FC across functionally related but distinct S1 subregions.

    27. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Sensory reanimation of the hand by transfer of the superficial branch of the radial nerve to the median and ulnar nerve

      Thilo L. Schenck, Shenyu Lin, Jessica K. Stewart, Konstantin C. Koban, Michaela Aichler, Farid Rezaeian and Riccardo E. Giunta

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.578

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      Our anatomic and histomorphometric results indicate that the SBRN is a suitable donor for the MN and SBUN. The measurements show feasibility of this procedure and shall help in planning this sensory nerve transfer. Identification of high axon density in the SBRN identifies it or its branches as an optimal candidate for sensory reanimation of the fingers and the thumb.

    28. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Support vector machine classification of arterial volume-weighted arterial spin tagging images

      Yash S. Shah, Luis Hernandez-Garcia, Hesamoddin Jahanian and Scott J. Peltier

      Version of Record online: 7 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.549

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      In this article, we test the performance of our recently introduced method for dynamic arterial blood volume imaging (AVAST) in the context of functional MRI data classification. AVAST is compared with blood oxygenation–level dependent (BOLD) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion data collected during a simple motor task using a support vector machine algorithm to classify the brain state. Findings suggest that the AVAST technique has similar performance as BOLD imaging, while preserving the statistical benefits of ASL techniques.

    29. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Cortical asymmetry in Parkinson's disease: early susceptibility of the left hemisphere

      Daniel O. Claassen, Katherine E. McDonell, Manus Donahue, Shiv Rawal, Scott A. Wylie, Joseph S. Neimat, Hakmook Kang, Peter Hedera, David Zald, Bennett Landman, Benoit Dawant and Swati Rane

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.573

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      In this study, we evaluated hemispheric differences in estimated rates of atrophy in a large, well-characterized cohort of PD patients. We describe a pattern of early left-lateralized cortical atrophy, which holds true regardless of handedness or side of motor severity. Our findings are consistent with previous reports of a left-lateralized distribution of cortical atrophy in PD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Further investigation is warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of this asymmetry and its implications for pathogenesis in neurodegeneration.

    30. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Reduced brain activation during inhibitory control in children with COMT Val/Val genotype

      Lora M. Cope, Jillian E. Hardee, Mary E. Soules, Margit Burmeister, Robert A. Zucker and Mary M. Heitzeg

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.577

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      The goal of this work was to investigate the association between genetic variation in COMT functioning and fronto-striatal brain functioning during inhibitory control, a critical aspect of behavioral control. Participants were 65 (22 female) 7–12 year olds who were genotyped for the functional COMT Val158Met (rs4680) single-nucleotide polymorphism and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a go/no-go task. There was a significant main effect of genotype on brain activation in left and right putamen during successful versus failed inhibition and in right inferior frontal gyrus/insula during successful inhibition versus baseline; follow-up tests revealed that Met homozygotes had greater activation in each region relative to Val homozygotes.

    31. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Structural and functional neural correlates of spatial navigation: a combined voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity study

      Xin Hao, Yi Huang, Xueting Li, Yiying Song, Xiangzhen Kong, Xu Wang, Zetian Yang, Zonglei Zhen and Jia Liu

      Version of Record online: 3 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.572

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      The research has found that the anatomical variation in a wide range of brain regions was associated with spatial navigation ability. Further network analyses revealed that these navigation-related regions constituted a hierarchical neural network through synchronized neural fluctuations under the resting state. Importantly, the brain network for spatial navigation can be further categorized into three relatively independent components: “scene recognition,” “cognitive map,” and “head direction for locomotion.”

    32. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Covariation between plasma phosphate and daytime cortisol in early Parkinson's disease

      Lena Håglin and Lennart Bäckman

      Version of Record online: 3 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.556

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      This study shows an inverse relationship between phosphate and cortisol together with a positive association with both albumin and transferrin in patients with Parkinson's disease. Mini-Mental State Examination score was associated with plasma phosphate in PD patients.

    33. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Dopaminergic modulation of default mode network brain functional connectivity in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

      Richard B. Silberstein, Andrew Pipingas, Maree Farrow, Florence Levy and Con K. Stough

      Version of Record online: 28 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.582

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      Methylphenidate robustly reversed the transient increase in brain functional connectivity observed in ADHD diagnosed boys while undertaking the A-X version of the continuous performance task. Brain functional connectivity was assessed using a 13 Hz steady-state visual evoked potential that appeared to preferentially index top-down cortico-cortico communication.

    34. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Brain functional connectivity abnormalities in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

      Richard B. Silberstein, Andrew Pipingas, Maree Farrow, Florence Levy, Con K. Stough and David A. Camfield

      Version of Record online: 28 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.583

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      Steady-state visually evoked potential coherence was used to examine rapid changes in brain functional connectivity in a group of boys diagnosed with ADHD and a control group. Compared to a low-demand reference task, the control group exhibited a robust reduction in parieto-frontal functional connectivity while performing the more demanding continuous performance task. By contrast, the ADHD group exhibited increased parieto-frontal and prefrontal functional connectivity during the continuous performance task. Our findings are consistent with suggestions of default mode network functional abnormalities in ADHD.

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      Orbitofrontal cortical thinning and aggression in mild traumatic brain injury patients

      Daniel J. Epstein, Margaret Legarreta, Elliot Bueler, Jace King, Erin McGlade and Deborah Yurgelun-Todd

      Version of Record online: 28 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.581

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      Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) comprises upwards of 80% of TBI, but to date, the neurobiological underpinnings of aggression in this population have not been morphologically explored.Compared to a health control group (= 27), a mTBI group (= 55) exhibited a significant decrease in the cortical thickness of the right LOFC. Additionally, the mTBI group displayed increased aggression on the Buss Perry Aggression Questionnaire, which negatively correlated with lateral OFC (LOFC) cortical thickness.

  2. Commentary

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A rare association between multiple sclerosis and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1B

      Rosa Cortese, Stefano Zoccolella, Maria Muglia, Alessandra Patitucci, Antonio Scarafino, Damiano Paolicelli and Isabella Laura Simone

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.580

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      The association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and hereditary and sporadic demyelinating disorders of the peripheral nervous system is extremely rare. We herein report a case of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B with p.Val102fs mutation in the MPZ gene that developed relapsing remitting MS.

  3. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      fMRI functional connectivity of the periaqueductal gray in PTSD and its dissociative subtype

      Sherain Harricharan, Daniela Rabellino, Paul A. Frewen, Maria Densmore, Jean Théberge, Margaret C. McKinnon, Allan N. Schore and Ruth A. Lanius

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.579

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      Posttraumatic stress disorder patients exhibited widespread periaqueductal gray functional connectivity during resting state, which may suggest the presence of greater defensive posturing at rest in these patients. Furthermore, those with the dissociative subtype of PTSD demonstrated unique functional connectivity patterns of the periaqueductal gray, with notable differences in connectivity between the dorsolateral and ventrolateral subdivisions.

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      Sleep duration and resting fMRI functional connectivity: examination of short sleepers with and without perceived daytime dysfunction

      Brian J. Curtis, Paula G. Williams, Christopher R. Jones and Jeffrey S. Anderson

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.576

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      Using the Human Connectome Project dataset, self-reported habitual short sleep duration (<6 hr/night) is shown to be one of the most informative behavioral characteristics underlying resting brain functional connectivity. Characteristic and reproducible findings differ with reported daytime dysfunction, and suggest that individuals who sleep less than six hours a night, even among those who deny daytime sleepiness, may be dependent on environmental stimulation to sustain wakefulness.

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      Striatal morphology correlates with frontostriatal electrophysiological motor processing in Huntington's disease: an IMAGE-HD study

      Lauren M. Turner, David Jakabek, Fiona A. Wilkes, Rodney J. Croft, Andrew Churchyard, Mark Walterfang, Dennis Velakoulis, Jeffrey C. L. Looi, Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis and Deborah Apthorp

      Version of Record online: 27 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/brb3.511

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      Research on Huntington's disease (HD) suggests that presymptomatic individuals show no functional motor abnormalities despite significant and well-established structural degeneration; however, our previous paper (Turner et al., PLoS One, 2015) identified aberrant premotor activation, which we suggest implicated frontostriatal network impairment. Here, we expand on our first study to demonstrate correlations between premotor activation and morphology of the striatum in a combined HD sample, suggesting that functional connectivity and motor compensation is dependent on structural integrity of such regions.

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