Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences

Cover image for Vol. 120 Issue 5

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Impact Factor: 3.426

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 19/175 (Geosciences Multidisciplinary)

Online ISSN: 2169-8961

Associated Title(s): Journal of Geophysical Research

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  1. 1 - 13
  1. Research Articles

    1. Soil surface organic layers in Arctic Alaska: Spatial distribution, rates of formation, and microclimatic effects

      Carson A. Baughman, Daniel H. Mann, David L. Verbyla and Michael L. Kunz

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015JG002983

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      Key Points

      • Organic layers on the ground surface protect underlying permafrost
      • These layers need 500–700 years to recover after disturbance
      • Topography and NDVI can be used to model soil surface organic layers in Alaska
    2. Chemical weathering and long-term CO2 consumption in the Ayeyarwady and Mekong river basins in the Himalayas

      Takuya Manaka, Souya Otani, Akihiko Inamura, Atsushi Suzuki, Thura Aung, Raywadee Roachanakanan, Takeshige Ishiwa and Hodaka Kawahata

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015JG002932

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      Key Points

      • Total alkalinity budgets of the Ayeyarwady are dominated by carbonate weathering
      • Long-term CO2 uptake by the Ayeyarwady is smaller than previous studies
      • The Himalayan contribution to the Cenozoic global cooling needs to be reviewed
    3. Emission of methyl chloride from a fern growing in subtropical, temperate, and cool-temperate climate zones

      Yoko Yokouchi, Akio Takenaka, Yuzo Miyazaki, Kimitaka Kawamura and Tsutom Hiura

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015JG002994

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      Key Points

      • Seasonal and spatial variations of CH3Cl emission from a fern were studied
      • Climate is not likely a major environmental factor controlling CH3Cl emission
      • Developmental stage might be an important factor controlling biogenic CH3Cl emission rates
    4. Soil organic matter composition and quality across fire severity gradients in coniferous and deciduous forests of the southern boreal region

      Jessica R. Miesel, William C. Hockaday, Randall K. Kolka and Philip A. Townsend

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015JG002959

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      Key Points

      • Carbohydrate stocks decreased with fire severity in organic and mineral layers
      • SOM stability index decreased and decomposition index increased with severity
      • Past fire legacies confound interpretation of single-fire effects on SOM
    5. Isotopic and nutritional evidence for species- and site-specific responses to N deposition and elevated CO2 in temperate forests

      Lucas C. R. Silva, Armando Gómez-Guerrero, Timothy A. Doane and William R. Horwath

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014JG002865

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      Key Points

      • Effects of rising CO2 were studied in forests under high and low N deposition
      • Response to rising CO2 varied with N deposition rates and species traits
      • The impact of N deposition was more evident in fir than pine trees
    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The interplay between transport and reaction rates as controls on nitrate attenuation in permeable, streambed sediments

      K. Lansdown, C. M. Heppell, M. Trimmer, A. Binley, A. L. Heathwaite, P. Byrne and H. Zhang

      Article first published online: 20 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014JG002874

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      Key Points

      • Deep sediments (>10 cm) are nitrate sinks in groundwater-fed rivers
      • Denitrification can be sustained without substantial buried organic matter
      • Denitrification in a sand-dominated reach can be transport-controlled
    7. Methane oxidation in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean water column

      Mary A. Pack, Monica B. Heintz, William S. Reeburgh, Susan E. Trumbore, David L. Valentine, Xiaomei Xu and Ellen R. M. Druffel

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014JG002900

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      Key Points

      • The first CH4 oxidation (MOx) rates in the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP) Ocean
      • Water column MOx strongly mitigates sea-air CH4 flux in the ETP region
      • Advances in rate measurements are needed to provide accurate ocean CH4 budgets
    8. Strontium source and depth of uptake shifts with substrate age in semiarid ecosystems

      Ashley A. Coble, Stephen C. Hart, Michael E. Ketterer, Gregory S. Newman and Andrew L. Kowler

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015JG002992

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      Key Points

      • Shift from rock-derived to atmospheric sources of Sr with substrate age
      • Plants acquire Sr from greater depths as ecosystem development progresses
      • Demonstrates that similar ecosystem processes occur across climate types
    9. Long-term variations in the dissolved oxygen budget of an urbanized tidal river: The upper Delaware Estuary

      Daniel J. Tomaso and Raymond G. Najjar

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014JG002758

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      Key Points

      • The upper Delaware Estuary is strongly net heterotrophic
      • Net oxygen consumption has decreased substantially between 1970 and 2014
      • Exchange with the atmosphere is the main process that balances O2 consumption
    10. Increased nitrogen export from eastern North America to the Atlantic Ocean due to climatic and anthropogenic changes during 1901–2008

      Qichun Yang, Hanqin Tian, Marjorie A. M. Friedrichs, Charles S. Hopkinson, Chaoqun Lu and Raymond G. Najjar

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014JG002763

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      Key Points

      • Nitrogen export from eastern North America increased from 1901 to 2008
      • Climate determined the interannual variability of nitrogen export
      • Enhanced nitrogen export was mainly contributed by increased nitrogen input
    11. Application of artificial neural networks as a tool for moisture prediction in microbially colonized halite in the Atacama Desert

      K. Wierzchos, J. C. Cancilla, J. S. Torrecilla, P. Díaz-Rodríguez, A. F. Davila, C. Ascaso, J. Nienow, C. P. McKay and J. Wierzchos

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014JG002837

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      Key Point

      • Prediction of moisture in halite from Atacama using an ANN-based model
    12. Isotopic identification of soil and permafrost nitrate sources in an Arctic tundra ecosystem

      Jeffrey M. Heikoop, Heather M. Throckmorton, Brent D. Newman, George B. Perkins, Colleen M. Iversen, Taniya Roy Chowdhury, Vladimir Romanovsky, David E. Graham, Richard J. Norby, Cathy J. Wilson and Stan D. Wullschleger

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014JG002883

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      Key Points

      • Nitrate isotopes indicate microbial nitrate in high-centered polygons
      • No clear primary isotopic signal of atmospheric nitrate in active layer soils
      • Permafrost nitrate isotopes intermediate to microbial and atmospheric nitrate
    13. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Distinct patterns of microbial metabolism associated to riverine dissolved organic carbon of different source and quality

      Martin Berggren and Paul A. del Giorgio

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015JG002963

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      Key Points

      • Riverine DOC is associated to patterns in microbial metabolic responses
      • These metabolic responses are strongly linked to both DOC quality and DOC source
      • Changes in DOC source affect aquatic ecosystem functioning

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