Clinical and Experimental Dermatology

Cover image for Vol. 40 Issue 8

Editor: Dr George W. M. Millington, Norwich, UK

Impact Factor: 1.092

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 45/63 (Dermatology)

Online ISSN: 1365-2230

Associated Title(s): British Journal of Dermatology

Author Guidelines


Online Submission
Patient Consent Form
Contact the Editorial Office


Clinical and Experimental Dermatology (CED) is a unique provider of relevant and accessible material of educational value to practising clinicians and dermatological researchers. In supporting the continuing professional development (CPD) of dermatology specialists, the journal aims to advance understanding, management and treatment of skin disease and improve patient outcomes.

In addition to a dedicated CPD section, CED publishes review articles, original papers, concise reports and items of correspondence. CED is an official organ of the British Association of Dermatologists but attracts contributions from all countries in which sound clinical practice is conducted, and its circulation is equally international.

Journal content and further information—including author guidelines and submission details—can be found online at The 2010 impact factor is 1.267.


Clinical and Experimental Dermatology invites the following types of submission:

Review articles

The Journal aims to publish concise, high-quality review articles on subjects of interest covering both clinical and experimental aspects of dermatology. Review articles may be solicited by the Editor or may be submitted by authors for publication subject to peer review. Review articles must include an abstract (maximum 250 words), should not exceed 1200 words of body text, and are limited to 30 references. A bulleted list of up to 6 'learning points' must also be included; learning points should synthesise the key take home messages and convey how the review article will improve patient health outcomes. Use of illustrations and figures in review articles is encouraged.

Review articles must also include 5 multiple choice questions (MCQs) which test the knowledge of the reader. Detailed guidelines for authors in writing MCQs are provided here.

Original articles

Original articles may be submitted as either a ‘clinical original article’ or an ‘experimental original article’. Original articles must include a structured abstract (maximum 250 words), should not exceed 2000 words of body text, and are limited to 25 references. Figures should not normally exceed four in number. Original articles must include bulleted statements (maximum 70 words) in answer to the following questions: what's already known about this topic?; what does this study add?

Concise reports

The Journal wishes to encourage submission of concise reports, which may be submitted as either a ‘clinical concise report’ (including case reports and case series) or an ‘experimental concise report’. Concise reports must include an abstract (maximum 150 words, no subtitles), followed by the body text formatted into an introduction, report and discussion, and should not exceed 1000 words (excluding references). No more than 10 references should be cited. A bulleted list of up to 6 'Learning Points' must also be included; Learning Points should synthesise the key take home messages and convey how the Concise Report will improve patient health outcomes. A maximum of three figures are permitted.


Correspondence (Letters to the Editor) may be in response to issues arising from recently published articles, or short, free-standing pieces expressing an opinion. The correspondence section aims to reflect a wide number of issues relevant to clinical and experimental studies in dermatology, as well as encompassing personal views on clinical practice or dermatological research. Letters should be formatted in one continuous section, should not exceed 500 words, and are limited to 5 references, two tables and two figures.

Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

The Journal aims to publish regular, peer-reviewed educational features relevant to the practice of clinical dermatology. These may be invited by the Editorial team, although direct submissions are also welcomed. The main types of article are currently:

• Clinicopathological cases—These should provide a test of the reader's diagnostic skills. For each, the clinical history, pathology and illustration(s) should be presented first (on one printed page of the Journal). This should be followed by the diagnosis, discussion and learning points. The entire text and all illustrative material will be limited to two printed pages of the Journal. As a guide, clinicopathological cases should not exceed 600 words and are limited to 6 references.

• A paper that changed clinical practice—Such articles should encompass discussion of a published paper that has made an impact on the author's management of patients. The text should not exceed 800 words and no more than 6 references should be cited.

• A memorable patient—These should report a case that made an impact on the author. The text should not exceed 600 words and should include no more than two figures and 6 references.

• Therapeutic vignette—These should describe, and preferably illustrate, a therapeutic technique regularly used and considered especially useful by the author. This may be surgical, medical, or may relate to other therapeutic and cosmetic modalities such as cryotherapy, lasers etc. Illustrations should not exceed 2 in number. The text should not exceed 800 words and up to 6 references may be cited.


Submissions should be made online at the Clinical and Experimental Dermatology ScholarOne Manuscripts site (formerly known as Manuscript Central). New users should first create an account. Once a user is logged onto the site, submissions should be made via the Author Centre.

Completed consent forms must be uploaded to ScholarOne Manuscripts at the same time as manuscript submission using file designation 'Supplementary files not for review'.

Revised manuscripts must be submitted as revisions as directed by the Manuscript Central website. Do not resubmit a revision as a new manuscript as this may result in re-review and considerable delay. The revision should be complete and contain all the tables and figures. Do not resubmit the original manuscript with your revision.


Manuscripts must be written in English and must comply with these instructions in every detail.

Text should be supplied in a word processed format such as Microsoft Word for Windows. Charts and tables are considered textual and should be supplied in the same format. Figures (illustrations, diagrams, photographs) should be supplied in gif, jpeg, tif or eps format.

All manuscripts must be typed in 12 pt font with lines double spaced and margins of at least 2.5 cm.

Abbreviations must be defined when first used, both in the abstract and in the main text.

Manuscripts must be as succinct as possible. Text must comply with the word and figure limits defined in Section 2. If authors consider that a manuscript should not conform to the limits specified, exceptionally good reasons must be clearly provided in a letter to the Editor accompanying the submission. Repetition of information or data in different sections of the manuscript must be carefully avoided. Manuscripts should, where appropriate, include:

Title Page

The first page of all manuscripts (including correspondence) should contain the following information:

1) the title of the paper
2) Surnames (family names) and initials of each author
3) name of the institution at which the research was conducted
4) name, address, telephone and fax number, and email address of corresponding author
5) 2–6 article keywords
6) manuscript word count (excluding abstract and references), table and figure count
7) any conflict of interest disclosures (see Section 5).
8) a running head not exceeding 50 characters


Authors submitting Original Articles should note that structured abstracts (maximum 250 words) are required. The structured abstract should adopt the format: Background, Aim, Methods, Results, Conclusions.

Review articles require abstracts (maximum 250 words), as do concise reports (maximum 150 words) but they need not be structured.

Abstracts should contain no reference citations.

Correspondence and CPD articles do not require abstracts.


This should in general, but not necessarily, be divided into sections with the headings: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, Acknowledgements, References, Tables, Legends and Figures. Figures should be submitted as separate files. The acknowledgements should include a statement of all funding sources that supported the work.

Please submit the full text of the manuscript, including the abstract, tables, legends, references and bulleted statements as a single document. A separate abstract will be requested on submission and will be used for inviting reviewers. This should match the abstract in the main manuscript.

Tables and Figures

Tables and figures should not be inserted in the appropriate place in the text but should be included at the end of the manuscript, each on a separate page.

Tables and figures should be referred to in text as follows: Fig. 1, Figs 2–4; Table 1, Table 2. The place at which a table or figure is to be inserted in the printed text should be indicated clearly on a manuscript. Each table and/or figure must have a legend that explains its purpose without reference to the text. Where a figure has more than one panel, each panel should be labelled in the top left-hand corner using lower case letters in parentheses i.e. ‘(a)’, ‘(b)’ etc., and a brief description of each panel given in the figure legend.

Only figures of excellent quality will be considered for publication.

The Journal will publish colour photographs free of charge subject to editorial approval.

Authors are themselves responsible for obtaining permission to reproduce previously published figures or tables. When an individual is identifiable in a photograph written permission must be obtained (see under ‘ethics’ below).


References should be in Vancouver format and appear as consecutive, unbracketed superscript numbers in the text, e.g. ‘in our previous reports1,2 and those of Smith et al. 3–5’ and should be listed numerically in the reference list at the end of the article.

Format references as below, using standard (Medline) abbreviations for journal titles. When there are more than four authors, include the first three authors followed by et al.

1 de Berker DAR, Baran R, Dawber RPR. The Nail in Dermatological Diseases. In: Baran and Dawber's Diseases of the Nails and their Management (Baran R, Dawber RPR, de Berker DAR, Haneke E, Tosti, A, eds), 3rd edn. Oxford: Blackwell Science Ltd, 2001: 172–92.

2 Murray ML, Cohen JB. Mycophenolate mofetil therapy for moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. Clin Exp Dermatol 2007; 32: 23–7.

3 Graham-Brown R, Burns T. Lecture Notes: Dermatology. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2006.

4 Smith A. (1999) Select committee report into social care in the community [WWW document]. URL [accessed on 7 November 2003].

We recommend the use of a tool such as EndNote for reference management and formatting. EndNote reference styles can be searched for here:


Original Publication

Submission of a manuscript will be held to imply that it contains original unpublished work and is not being submitted for publication elsewhere at the same time. The author must supply a full statement to the Editor about all submissions and previous reports that might be regarded as redundant or duplicate publication of the same or very similar work. CED employs a plagiarism detection system. By submitting your manuscript, you accept that your manuscript may be screened for plagiarism against previously published works.

Conflicts of Interest

Authors are responsible for disclosing all financial and personal relationships between themselves and others that might be perceived by others as biasing their work. To prevent ambiguity, authors must state explicitly whether potential conflicts do or do not exist.


When reporting experiments on human subjects, indicate whether the procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional or regional) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 1983. Do not use patients' names, initials or hospital numbers, especially in illustrative material. When reporting experiments on animals, indicate whether the institution's or a national research council's guide for, or any national law on, the care and use of laboratory animals was followed. A statement describing explicitly the ethical background to the studies being reported should be included in all manuscripts in the Materials and Methods section. Ethics committee or institutional review board approval should be stated.

Patients have a right to privacy that should not be infringed without informed consent. Identifying information should not be published in written descriptions, photographs and pedigrees unless the information is essential for scientific purposes and the patient (or parent or guardian) gives written informed consent for publication. Identifying details should be omitted if they are not essential but patient data should never be altered or falsified in an attempt to attain anonymity. Complete anonymity is difficult to achieve and informed consent should be obtained if there is any doubt. For example, masking the eye region in photographs of patients is inadequate protection of anonymity.


All persons designated as authors should qualify for authorship and all those who qualify should be listed. Each author should have participated sufficiently in the work to take public responsibility for appropriate portions of the content. One or more authors should take responsibility for the integrity of the work as a whole, from inception to published article. Authorship credit should be based only on 1) substantial contributions to conception and design, or acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; 2) drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content; 3) final approval of the version to be published. Conditions 1, 2 and 3 must all be met. Acquisition of funding, the collection of data or general supervision of the research group, by themselves, do not justify authorship. All others who contributed to the work who are not authors should be named in the Acknowledgements section.

Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE)

As a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE), adherence to these submission criteria is considered essential for publication in Clinical and Experimental Dermatology; mandatory fields are included in the online submission process to ensure this. If, at a later stage in the submission process or even after publication, a manuscript or authors are found to have disregarded these criteria, it is the duty of the Editor to report this to COPE. COPE may recommend that action be taken, including but not exclusive to, informing the authors' professional regulatory body and/or institution of such a dereliction.

The website for COPE may be accessed at:

Copyright Transfer Agreement

If your paper is accepted, the author identified as the formal corresponding author for the paper will receive an email prompting them to login into Author Services; where via the Wiley Author Licensing Service (WALS) they will be able to complete the license agreement on behalf of all authors on the paper.

For authors signing the copyright transfer agreement
If the OnlineOpen option is not selected the corresponding author will be presented with the copyright transfer agreement (CTA) to sign. The terms and conditions of the CTA can be previewed in the samples associated with the Copyright FAQs below:
CTA Terms and Conditions

For authors choosing OnlineOpen
If the OnlineOpen option is selected the corresponding author will have a choice of the following Creative Commons License Open Access Agreements (OAA):

Creative Commons Attribution License OAA
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License OAA
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial -NoDerivs License OAA

To preview the terms and conditions of these open access agreements please visit the Copyright FAQs hosted on Wiley Author Services and visit

If you select the OnlineOpen option and your research is funded by The Wellcome Trust and members of the Research Councils UK (RCUK) you will be given the opportunity to publish your article under a CC-BY license supporting you in complying with Wellcome Trust and Research Councils UK requirements. For more information on this policy and the Journal’s compliant self-archiving policy please visit:



OnlineOpen is available to authors of primary research articles who wish to make their article available to non-subscribers on publication, or whose funding agency requires grantees to archive the final version of their article. With OnlineOpen the author, the author's funding agency, or the author's institution pays a fee to ensure that the article is made available to non-subscribers upon publication vis Wiley Online Library, as well as deposited in the funding agency's preferred archive. For the full list of terms and conditions, see

Prior to acceptance, there is no requirement to inform the Editorial Office that you intend to publish your paper OnlineOpen if you do not wish to. All OnlineOpen articles are treated in the same way as any other article. They go through the Journal's standard peer-review process and will be accepted or rejected based on their own merit.

Any authors wishing to send their paper OnlineOpen will be required to complete the payment form available from our website at:


The corresponding author will receive an email alert containing a link to a web site. The proof can be downloaded as a PDF file from this site. Further instructions will be sent with the proof. Excessive changes made by the author in the proofs, excluding typesetting errors, will be charged separately. Author proof corrections should be emailed to the Production Editor at

Author services

Author Services enables authors to track their article—once it has been accepted—through the production process to publication online and in print. Authors can check the status of their articles online and choose to receive automated e-mails at key stages of production. The author will receive an e-mail with a unique link that enables them to register and have their article automatically added to the system. Please ensure that a complete e-mail address is provided when submitting the manuscript. Visit for more details on online production tracking and for a wealth of resources including FAQs and tips on article preparation, submission and more.

Early View

Clinical and Experimental Dermatology is covered by the Publisher's Early View service. Early View articles are complete full-text articles published online in advance of their publication in a printed issue. Articles are therefore available as soon as they are ready, rather than having to wait for the next scheduled print issue. Early View articles are complete and final. They have been fully reviewed, revised and edited for publication, and the authors’ final corrections have been incorporated. Because they are in final form, no changes can be made after online publication. The nature of Early View articles means that they do not yet have volume, issue or page numbers, so Early View articles cannot be cited in the traditional way. They are therefore given a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the article to be cited and tracked before it is allocated to an issue. After print publication, the DOI remains valid and can continue to be used to cite and access the article. More information about DOIs can be found online at Articles to be published in the Continuing Professional Development section of the journal will not be published Early View.


Free access to the final PDF offprint of your article will be available via Author Services only. Please therefore sign up for Author Services if you would like to access your article PDF offprint and enjoy the many other benefits the service offers.

Note to NIH Grantees

Pursuant to NIH mandate, Wiley-Blackwell will post the accepted version of contributions authored by NIH grant-holders to PubMed Central upon acceptance.  This accepted version will be made publicly available 12 months after publication. For further information, see