Ecological Entomology

Cover image for Vol. 42 Issue 3

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Rebeca B. Rosengaus, Francis Gilbert and Bernard D. Roitberg

Impact Factor: 1.687

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 23/94 (Entomology)

Online ISSN: 1365-2311

Associated Title(s): Agricultural and Forest Entomology, Insect Conservation and Diversity, Insect Conservation and Diversity, Medical and Veterinary Entomology, Physiological Entomology, Systematic Entomology

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  1. Short Communications

    1. A defensive endosymbiont fails to protect aphids against the parasitoid community present in the field

      PAUL A. LENHART and JENNIFER A. WHITE

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12419

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      Among Aphis craccivora in a central Kentucky alfalfa field, we demonstrate experimentally that Hamiltonella infection did not lower successful parasitism by naturally occurring parasitoid wasps.

      Hamiltonella was also ineffective against the most common parasitoid wasp species in a controlled laboratory assay.

      Our work emphasises the fact that defensive symbionts sometimes provide no tangible defensive benefits under field conditions, depending on parasitoid community composition.

    2. Host phylogeny and nutrient content drive galler diversity and abundance on willows

      MARTIN VOLF, JAN KADLEC, PHILIP T. BUTTERILL and VOJTECH NOVOTNY

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12420

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      We studied gall abundance and richness on willows to illustrate the processes maintaining one of the richest assemblages of gall formers associated with a single genus of host plants.

      Integrated information on willow defences, nutrient content and phylogeny shows that the abundance of gallers on willows is affected mainly by leaf nutrient content.

      On the other hand, the richness of gallers was affected mainly by willow phylogeny, suggesting that it is probably willow radiation driving galler speciation.

    3. Actuarial senescence in laboratory and field populations of Lepidoptera

      JUSTIN CARROLL and THOMAS N. SHERRATT

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12417

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      Recent observations of actuarial senescence – an increase in mortality rate with age – have challenged the assertion that the brevity of adult insect life spans precludes ageing.

      Here we quantified the rate of senescence in 22 species of Lepidoptera by fitting demographic models to adult survivorship data drawn from a range of field and laboratory studies.

      Senescence was evident in all 22 species investigated, with a model of age-related mortality consistently fitting the survivorship curves significantly better than an alternative model that assumes constant mortality.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Biology, ecology and demography of the tropical treehopper Ennya maculicornis (Hemiptera: Membracidae): relationships between female fitness, maternal care and oviposition sites

      LILIANA CACERES-SANCHEZ, DANIEL TORRICO-BAZOBERRY, ROMINA COSSIO, KENIA REQUE, SANDRA AGUILAR, HERMANN M. NIEMEYER and CARLOS F. PINTO

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12410

    2. Evidence for the transfer of a soil-borne contaminant from plants to ants via an aphid mediator

      DEBORAH G. DE LA RIVA, MICHAEL B. JONES and JOHN T. TRUMBLE

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12415

    3. Behavioural ecology of defence in a risky environment: caterpillars versus ants in a Neotropical savanna

      SEBASTIÁN F. SENDOYA and PAULO S. OLIVEIRA

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12416

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      We investigate whether caterpillars with morphological or behavioural defences have decreased risk of falling prey to ants, and if defence traits mediate host plant use in ant-rich cerrado savanna.

      Caterpillars without morphological defences or inside open shelters were found on plants with fewer ants. Caterpillars using ant-visited plants (with extrafloral nectaries) lived in closed shelters or presented morphological defences.

      Efficient defence against ants is crucial for caterpillar survival and mediates host plant use by lepidopterans in cerrado. Our study highlights the importance of a tritrophic viewpoint in risky environments.

    4. Healthier or bigger? Trade-off mediating male dimorphism in the black scavenger fly Sepsis thoracica (Diptera: Sepsidae)

      JUAN P. BUSSO, WOLF U. BLANCKENHORN and DANIEL GONZÁLES-TOKMAN

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12413

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      We found a male polymorphism in Sepsis thoracica, which is largely determined by condition-dependent plasticity rather than genes.

      The males' polymorphism involves a trade-off between body size and immunity.

      Contrary to the predictions of the density-dependent prophylaxis hypothesis, larval density did not affect the immune system activity of the individuals.

    5. Behavioural plasticity induced by intraspecific competition in host orientation in a parasitoid

      GUSTAVO A. MARTÍNEZ, MARCELA K. CASTELO and JOSÉ E. CRESPO

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12407

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      Increasing the intensity of intraspecific competition lowers the host selectivity threshold in a density-dependent way.

      Increasing the density of conspecifics increases the orientation to sub-optimal hosts' odours in a linear fashion.

      Modulation of the orientation to sub-optimal host odours is a general response to every sub-optimal host.

    6. High floral resource density leads to neural constraint in the generalist, floriphilic katydid, Phaneroptera brevis (Orthoptera: Phaneropterinae)

      MING KAI TAN, CHERYL J. M. LEEM and HUGH T. W. TAN

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12414

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      The present results indicated that increase in floral-resource density generally led to lower efficiency and attentiveness in the foraging floriphilic katydids.

      The first evidence of the neural constraint hypothesis in the context of resource density is provided.

      The applicability of the neural constraint hypothesis in florivory is also corroborated.

    7. Impacts of grazing intensity and increased precipitation on a grasshopper assemblage (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in a meadow steppe

      HUI ZHU, YEKUAN QU, DUO ZHANG, JUNJIAN LI, MING WEN, DELI WANG and BINGZHONG REN

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12403

    8. Vertical transmission in feather mites: insights into its adaptive value

      JORGE DOÑA, JAIME POTTI, IVÁN DE LA HERA, GUILLERMO BLANCO, OSCAR FRÍAS and ROGER JOVANI

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12408

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      The adaptive causes of symbiont transmission strategies are little understood. Here we studied the vertical transmission of ectosymbiotic mites living on bird feathers.

      We found that feather mites transmit massively from parents to chicks even though adult birds are considered to be safer hosts.

      We compared the observed transmission patterns with hypothetical predictions and concluded that massive transmission could be interpreted as a way to reduce intraspecific competition or to spread the risk of host mortality.

    9. Availability of unfertilised eggs increases the fitness of nymphal crickets (Gryllidae)

      YANG ZENG, FENG-HAO ZHOU, WEI-NAN KANG and DAO-HONG ZHU

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12411

  3. Short Communications

    1. Host plant exodus and larval wandering behaviour in a butterfly: diapause generation larvae wander for longer periods than do non-diapause generation larvae

      CHRISTER WIKLUND, CONSTANTÍ STEFANESCU and MAGNE FRIBERG

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12409

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      When fully grown, butterfly larvae enter a wandering phase and typically pupate at a distance from their host plant, probably because mortality from predation decreases with distance from the host.

      The duration of the wandering phase is probably a trade-off between mortality during wandering and mortality during the pupal period, giving more weight to reducing pupal mortality in overwintering generations.

      In accordance with theory, we show that larvae wander for longer in diapausing, overwintering, generations compared with directly developing, summer, generations of the bivoltine European swallowtail butterfly, Papilio machaon.

  4. Original Articles

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Plant-mediated species networks: the modulating role of herbivore density

      ANA PINEDA, ROXINA SOLER, VICTORIA PASTOR, YEHUA LI and MARCEL DICKE

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12404

    2. Foraging at a safe distance: crab spider effects on pollinators

      SPENCER HUEY and JAMES C. NIEH

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12406

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      Nearly all pollinator taxa (honey bees, wasps, other Hymenoptera and non-bombyliid flies) spent less time foraging on the predator cluster.

      Visiting honey bees and wasps avoided inflorescences within 90 mm of the crab spider: they spent three- and 18-fold more time, respectively, foraging on more distant flower clusters.

      Whether honey bees can smell spiders was then tested, and this study provides the first demonstration that honey bees will avoid crab spider odour alone at a food source.

  5. Methods

  6. Original Articles

    1. Phylloplane bacteria increase the negative impact of food limitation on insect fitness

      GRANT L. OLSON, JUDITH H. MYERS, LIA HEMERIK and JENNY S. CORY

      Version of Record online: 3 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12399

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      Organisms are subjected to multiple stressors in natural situations; however, the impacts of combined stressors on fitness are rarely assessed.

      Here we show that the combination of food limitation and phylloplane bacteria had negative synergistic effects on survival, growth rate and pupal mass, but feeding on induced foliage had mixed effects.

      Fecundity was only reduced by food limitation but insects fed damaged leaves produced smaller eggs.

  7. Short Communications

    1. Do males with higher mating success invest more in armaments? An across-populations study in damselflies

      SZYMON SNIEGULA, MONIKA A. PRUS, MARIA J. GOLAB and DAVID OUTOMURO

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12397

  8. Original Articles

    1. Habitat variation, mutualism and predation shape the spatio-temporal dynamics of tansy aphids

      MATTHIAS SENFT, WOLFGANG W. WEISSER and SHARON E. ZYTYNSKA

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12396

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      • Tansy aphid metapopulations are not only structured by dispersal limitations and population growth but also by the biotic community in which they live.
      • Mutualistic ants shape the metapopulation structure of tansy aphids by increasing the colonisation success of empty plant patches.
      • Top-down predation effects do not exclusively drive aphid metapopulation structuring in this system, it is rather a combination of many factors acting at the same time.
    2. The use of digital video recorders in pollination biology

      AMY-MARIE GILPIN, ANDREW J. DENHAM and DAVID J. AYRE

      Version of Record online: 21 FEB 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12394

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