Ecological Entomology

Cover image for Vol. 42 Issue 6

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Rebeca B. Rosengaus, Francis Gilbert and Bernard D. Roitberg

Impact Factor: 1.771

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2016: 20/93 (Entomology)

Online ISSN: 1365-2311

Associated Title(s): Agricultural and Forest Entomology, Insect Conservation and Diversity, Insect Conservation and Diversity, Medical and Veterinary Entomology, Physiological Entomology, Systematic Entomology

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  1. 1 - 20
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  1. Original Articles

    1. Entrapped sand as a plant defence: effects on herbivore performance and preference

      ERIC F. LOPRESTI, PATRICK GROF-TISZA, MORIA ROBINSON, JESSIE GODFREY and RICHARD KARBAN

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12483

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      • Many plants entrap sand on their sticky surfaces (‘psammophory’).
      • This sand negatively affects preference for and performance on these plants by a large, externally feeding caterpillar, but not a leaf miner.
      • Sand reduced performance, possibly due to extreme mandibular wear suffered by caterpillars feeding on these sandy plants.
    2. Seasonal variation in abundance and diversity of eavesdropping frog-biting midges (Diptera, Corethrellidae) in a neotropical rainforest

      HENRY D. LEGETT, VIKTOR A. BARANOV and XIMENA E. BERNAL

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12492

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      • For tropical predators and parasites, precipitation patterns result in seasonal changes in prey and host availability.
      • The seasonal interaction between frog-biting midges (Corethrella spp.) and their hosts was investigated, examining how the abundance and diversity of the midge community fluctuate between the rainy and dry season.
      • The results of this study suggest that midge populations can shift between hosts as they become available across seasons, allowing adult populations of frog-biting midges to persist year-round.
    3. Spatial distribution, sampling efficiency and Taylor's power law

      R. A. J. TAYLOR

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12487

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      • Combining L.R. Taylor's definition of sampling efficiency with the eponymous power law demonstrates how density-dependent sampling efficiency modifies the slope of Taylor's power law (TPL).
      • Attractant traps, such as pheromone and light traps which depend upon a behavioural response, causing efficiency to decline with increasing population density, underestimate the slope of TPL.
      • The alteration of TPL by density-dependent efficiency of behaviourally mediated attractant samplers suggests that the power law is sensitive to the target's spatial behaviour.
    4. Niche divergence of two closely related Carbula species (Insecta: Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) despite the presence of a hybrid zone

      HUAXI LIU, ZHEN YE, JINGYU LIANG, SHUJING WANG and WENJUN BU

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12486

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      • Ecological niche modelling (ENM), multilocus genetic markers and morphological variation analyses were applied to delineate a geographical hybrid zone between Carbula humerigera (Uhler, 1860) and Carbula putoni (Jakovlev, 1876).
      • This study revealed that the two closely related Carbula species occupy different ecological niches, possibly maintained by ecologically divergent selection, despite hybridisation and ongoing gene flow.
      • The results suggest that niche divergence and climate change played a key role in facilitating and maintaining divergence of the two closely related Carbula species.
    5. Nesting aggregation as a predictor of brood parasitism in mason bees (Osmia spp.)

      ADAM F. GROULX and JESSICA R. K. FORREST

      Version of Record online: 1 NOV 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12484

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      • Higher nest densities increase brood parasitism by sapygid wasps in natural mason bee populations. This effect is observed even in small aggregations of nesting bees (< five individuals).
      • Evidence that mason bees terminate parasitised nests suggests a defensive strategy by which bees minimise further offspring losses to brood parasites.
      • Increased parasitism in larger nesting aggregations has implications for the management of mason bees in agriculture, as cultivating them at high densities could reduce offspring survival.
    6. Nature protection areas of Europe are insufficient to preserve the threatened beetle Rosalia alpina (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae): evidence from species distribution models and conservation gap analysis

      LUCIANO BOSSO, SONIA SMERALDO, PIERPAOLO RAPUZZI, GIANFRANCO SAMA, ANTONIO P. GARONNA and DANILO RUSSO

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12485

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      • Suitable habitat for Rosalia alpina in Europe amounts to c. 754 171 km2 and stretches across substantially uninterrupted areas from Portugal to Romania and from Greece to Germany.
      • The overlay between the existing system of conservation areas in Europe and the binary map for R. alpina showed that only c. 42% of potential habitat is protected.
      • Special areas of conservation, special protection areas, Natura 2000 network and national protected areas protect 25%, 21%, 31% and 29%, respectively, of Rosalia alpina's potential habitat.
    7. Evolution of the optimal reproductive schedule in the ant Camponotus (Colobopsis) nipponicus (wheeler): a demographic approach

      EISUKE HASEGAWA, SAORI WATANABE and YUUKA MURAKAMI

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12478

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      • The reproductive schedule of an ant was examined for its optimality.
      • Having enough demographic data enables the above issue to be examined without the usual required effort and time.
      • This study showed that the schedule is optimised to maximise the expected lifetime fitness, and that having enough demographic data is a useful tool to study this usually difficult issue.
    8. Lower thermal tolerance in nocturnal than in diurnal ants: a challenge for nocturnal ectotherms facing global warming

      CARLOS GARCIA-ROBLEDO, HECTOR CHUQUILLANQUI, ERIN K. KUPREWICZ and FEDERICO ESCOBAR-SARRIA

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12481

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      • Tolerance to high temperatures is a physiological trait that will determine the ability of ectotherms to cope with projected global warming.
      • This study explores differences in heat tolerance among diurnal and nocturnal ant species in four ecosystems in Mexico. In general, nocturnal ants display lower thermal tolerance than diurnal ants.
      • The projected increase in nocturnal temperatures, combined with lower tolerance to high temperatures, could represent a substantial challenge for nocturnal ectotherms in a warming world.
    9. Effect of host instar on host discrimination of heterospecific-parasitised hosts by sympatric parasitoids

      RUTH CEBOLLA, PABLO BRU, ALBERTO URBANEJA and ALEJANDRO TENA

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12479

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      • The effect of host instar on the ability of parasitoids to discriminate between unparasitised and heterospecific-parasitised hosts is tested using two parasitoid of genus Aphytis.
      • Both parasitoid species were able to discriminate when they found third-instar hosts (larger size) but not when they found second-instar hosts (smaller size).
      • The behavioural strategies adopted towards multi-parasitise third-instar hosts varied between species. Aphytis chrysomphali reduced its clutch size in heterospecific-parasitised hosts and A. melinus tended to probe them for longer.
    10. You have free access to this content
      The impacts of predators and parasites on wild bumblebee colonies

      DAVE GOULSON, STEPH O'CONNOR and KIRSTY J. PARK

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12482

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      • Forty-seven wild bumblebee nests were located using a trained sniffer dog and volunteers. The entrances to 32 nests were filmed continuously to identify successful nests and observe predation events.
      • Great tits (Parus major) depredated or attempted to depredate bees on 32 occasions at the entrances to 10 nests, something that has not previously been described.
      • Nests with a high prevalence of the gut parasite Crithidia bombi infection were less likely to produce gynes, the first evidence of a direct impact of this common parasite on bumblebee colony reproduction in wild nests.
    11. Venom is beneficial but not essential for development and survival of Nasonia

      ELLEN O. MARTINSON and JOHN H. WERREN

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12480

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      • Nasonia venom is beneficial, but not essential, to developing larvae and has implications for how to interpret venom composition and host effects going forward.
      • Wasps raised on unstung hosts have higher mortality but similar lifetime fecundity to wasps on stung or cold-killed hosts. However, after multiple generations on cold-killed hosts, significant fitness reduction is seen.
      • The major benefits of venom are to induce developmental arrest and suppress the host response to the larva; however other effects of venom may be significant to the fitness of developing wasps under natural or stressful conditions.
    12. Spatial and temporal variation in host–parasitoid interactions: leafcutter ant hosts and their phorid parasitoids

      LUCIANA ELIZALDE, RICHARD J. W. PATROCK, R. HENRY L. DISNEY and PATRICIA J. FOLGARAIT

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12477

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      • Phorid parasitoids of leafcutter ants represent a well-defined module within a larger network of ant–symbiont interactions, with most parasitoid species being highly specialised, using one ant species as host.
      • Interaction frequency for parasitoid species using more than one host species was not related to host abundance, indicating host election.
      • The high specialization in these parasitoids, even when hosts are phylogenetically related and highly similar in their ecology, is promising from a biological control perspective.
    13. Host plant and habitat preference of the endangered Euphydryas maturna (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): evidence from northern Europe

      LY LINDMAN, JAANUS REMM, HENDRIK MEISTER and TOOMAS TAMMARU

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12474

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      • The larvae representing the Estonian population of the endangered butterfly Euphydryas maturna are able to develop on Fraxinus excelsior, Viburnum opulus, and Melampyrum pratense.
      • Both smaller-scale habitat occupancy analyses as well as a country-wide landscape occupancy analyses suggest that the butterfly is associated with F. excelsior in Estonia, which is different from the situation in neighbouring Finland.
      • Conservation actions for E. maturna should focus on securing the favourable status of the locally used host plant; F. excelsior is currently threatened by a fungal disease.
    14. Linkages between nectaring and oviposition preferences of Manduca sexta on two co-blooming Datura species in the Sonoran Desert

      GORDON P. SMITH, CHRISTOPHER A. JOHNSON, GOGGY DAVIDOWITZ and JUDITH L. BRONSTEIN

      Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12475

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      • In the hawkmoth Manduca sexta, behavioural links between nectaring and oviposition behaviour can bias oviposition decisions onto inferior larval hosts.
      • Late-instar M. sexta larvae had higher survivorship on the large perennial Datura wrightii compared with the smaller annual Datura discolor.
      • Adult moths in general preferred D. wrightii as an oviposition host, but showed no preference between the species when only D. discolor bore flowers.
  2. Short Communications

    1. Pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris) reduce secretion of extrafloral nectar in broad bean (Vicia faba)

      TATSUYA YOSHIDA, HARUKA KAKUTA and YASUYUKI CHOH

      Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12476

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      • This study tested whether broad bean plants (Vicia faba) reduced secretion of extrafloral nectar (EFN), which functions as an indirect defence against herbivores after infestation of pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris).
      • Acyrthosiphon pisum-infested broad bean plants secreted significantly smaller amounts of EFN than did uninfested plants and plants infested by another aphid species (Aphis craccivora Koch).
      • These results suggest that A. pisum reduced EFN production in broad bean plants.
  3. Original Articles

    1. An asexual strain of Lysiphlebus fabarum (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) gains fitness in superparasitised hosts, but a sexual strain pays costs

      Arash Rasekh, J. P. Michaud, Leila Mohseni and Farhan Kocheili

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12473

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      • In a comparison of a sexual and an asexual strain of Lysiphlebus fabarum, it was noted that superparasitism increased body size and ovary size in asexual females, but delayed development in sexual females and reduced their egg load.
      • Elimination of supernumerary sexual larvae in superparasitised aphids was complete after 4.5 days, but no such elimination occurred among asexual larvae, suggesting more cooperative host exploitation.
      • Sexual females parasitised a larger percentage of available hosts, suggesting that they sought to maximise offspring number, whereas asexual females benefited from improved host quality in superparasitised hosts.
    2. Plant species, mycorrhiza, and aphid age influence the performance and behaviour of a generalist

      VIKTORIA V. TOMCZAK and CAROLINE MÜLLER

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12461

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      • Life-history traits of generalist aphids are partly affected by external variables, such as plant species and arbuscular mycorrhiza, but individuals can compensate for differences in plant quality during ontogeny.
      • Nymphal activity, which is assumed to be an important behavioural trait in predator escape and resource localisation in an unprotected and unknown environment, is highly impacted by aphid age.
      • The combination of extrinsic and intrinsic variables shapes aphid activity and exploration.
    3. Trophic ecology of adult male Odonata. I. Dietary niche metrics by foraging guild, species, body size, and location

      LENIN D. CHARI, SYDNEY MOYO and NICOLE B. RICHOUX

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12458

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      • The use of both fatty acid and stable isotope tracers has improved researchers' understanding of the trophic ecology of odonates.
      • There is dietary niche separation amongst odonates of different sizes and foraging strategies.
      • Dietary niche overlap and resource sharing are greater amongst odonate species at a less productive section of a river than among those in a more productive one.
    4. Trophic ecology of adult male Odonata. II. Dietary contributions of aquatic food sources

      LENIN D. CHARI, SYDNEY MOYO and NICOLE B. RICHOUX

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12459

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      • The extent of dietary contributions of aquatic food sources to odonate diets is influenced by body size and foraging strategies.
      • Odonates in different sections of the same river have different proportions of aquatic food sources in their diets, with those in upstream areas having higher proportions than those downstream.
      • Generally, there is a high amount of interspecific variation in the dietary proportions of aquatic food sources of odonates.
    5. Patterns of parasitism in monarch butterflies during the breeding season in eastern North America

      D. T. TYLER FLOCKHART, ANJULI DABYDEEN, DARA A. SATTERFIELD, KEITH A. HOBSON, LEONARD I. WASSENAAR and D. RYAN NORRIS

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/een.12460

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      • Migratory behavior can result in reduced prevalence of pathogens in host populations through escaping pathogen accumulation in contaminated environments or the selective removal of infected individuals that occurs during migration.
      • Infection prevalence in monarchs increased over the breeding season and was higher at southern latitudes compared to northern latitudes. There was no effect of migration distance on infection prevalence.
      • These results imply a potential fitness advantage to monarchs that migrate further north to exploit parasite-free habitats during the monarchs' spring and summer movements when they recolonize the breeding range.

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