Functional Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 8

Accepted Articles (Accepted, unedited articles published online and citable. The final edited and typeset version of record will appear in future.)

Edited By: Charles Fox, Duncan Irschick, Ken Thompson, Alan Knapp and Craig White.

Impact Factor: 5.21

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 15/149 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 1365-2435

Associated Title(s): Journal of Animal Ecology, Journal of Applied Ecology, Journal of Ecology, Methods in Ecology and Evolution

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  1. 1 - 24
  1. Standard Papers

    1. Resource- and pollinator-mediated selection on floral traits

      Nina Sletvold, Matthew Tye and Jon Ågren

      Accepted manuscript online: 29 AUG 2016 06:10AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12757

    2. Endure and Call for Help: Strategies of Black Mustard Plants to deal with a Specialised Caterpillar

      Dani Lucas-Barbosa, Marcel Dicke, Twan Kranenburg, Yavanna Aartsma, Teris A. van Beek, Martinus E. Huigens and Joop J.A. van Loon

      Accepted manuscript online: 29 AUG 2016 06:05AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12756

    3. Herbivore-specific induction of defence metabolites in a grass-endophyte association

      Benjamin Fuchs, Markus Krischke, Martin J. Mueller and Jochen Krauss

      Accepted manuscript online: 29 AUG 2016 05:55AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12755

    4. Dynamic changes in death cues modulate risks and rewards of corpse management in a social insect

      Qian Sun, Kenneth F. Haynes and Xuguo Zhou

      Accepted manuscript online: 27 AUG 2016 04:30AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12754

  2. Plant-pollinator interactions from flower to landscape

    1. Reviews

      You have free access to this content
      The long and the short of it: a global analysis of hawkmoth pollination niches and interaction networks

      Steven D. Johnson, Marcela Moré, Felipe W. Amorim, William A. Haber, Gordon W. Frankie, Dara A. Stanley, Andrea A. Coccuci and Robert A. Raguso

      Accepted manuscript online: 27 AUG 2016 04:30AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12753

  3. Standard Papers

    1. Does diet drive the evolution of head shape and bite force in chameleons of the genus Bradypodion?

      Alexis Y. Dollion, G. John Measey, Raphaël Cornette, Liza Carne, Krystal A. Tolley, Jessica M. da Silva, Renaud Boistel, Anne-Claire Fabre and Anthony Herrel

      Accepted manuscript online: 27 AUG 2016 04:25AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12750

  4. Plant-pollinator interactions from flower to landscape

    1. Reviews

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      Direct interactions between invasive plants and native pollinators: evidence, impacts and approaches

      Jane C. Stout and Erin Jo Tiedeken

      Accepted manuscript online: 27 AUG 2016 04:25AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12751

  5. Standard Papers

    1. Differential aphid toxicity to ladybeetles is not a function of host plant or facultative bacterial symbionts

      Jennifer A. White, Joshua S. McCord, Kelly A. Jackson, Allison C. Dehnel and Paul A. Lenhart

      Accepted manuscript online: 23 AUG 2016 08:55AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12736

    2. Relationship between cladoceran (Crustacea) functional diversity and lake trophic gradients

      Liisa Nevalainen and Tomi P. Luoto

      Accepted manuscript online: 23 AUG 2016 08:55AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12737

    3. Tree Genetics Strongly Affect Forest Productivity, but Intraspecific Diversity-Productivity Relationships Do Not

      Dylan G. Fischer, Gina M. Wimp, Erika Hersch-Green, Randy K. Bangert, Carri J. LeRoy, Joseph K. Bailey, Jennifer A. Schweitzer, Clarissa Dirks, Stephen C. Hart, Gerard J. Allan and Thomas G. Whitham

      Accepted manuscript online: 23 AUG 2016 08:45AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12733

    4. Temporal dynamics of nutrient uptake by neighboring plant species: evidence from intercropping

      Wei-Ping Zhang, Guang-Cai Liu, Jian-Hao Sun, Dario Fornara, Li-Zhen Zhang, Fang-Fang Zhang and Long Li

      Accepted manuscript online: 23 AUG 2016 08:45AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12732

    5. Accumulation rates and sources of external nitrogen in decaying wood in a Norway spruce dominated forest

      Katja T. Rinne, Tiina Rajala, Krista Peltoniemi, Janet Chen, Aino Smolander and Raisa Mäkipää

      Accepted manuscript online: 23 AUG 2016 08:45AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12734

    6. Fungal endophytes as priority colonizers initiating wood decomposition

      Zewei Song, Peter G. Kennedy, Feng Jin Liew and Jonathan S. Schilling

      Accepted manuscript online: 23 AUG 2016 08:45AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12735

    7. The influence of DOC and UVR on the genomic integrity of Daphnia magna

      Raoul Wolf, Tom Andersen, Dag O. Hessen and Ketil Hylland

      Accepted manuscript online: 23 AUG 2016 08:40AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12730

    8. Disentangling the interplay of generative and vegetative propagation among different functional groups during gap colonization in meadows

      Alena Vítová, Petr Macek and Jan Lepš

      Accepted manuscript online: 23 AUG 2016 08:40AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12731

    9. Accelerometers can measure total and activity-specific energy expenditures in free-ranging marine mammals only if linked to time-activity budgets

      Tiphaine Jeanniard-du-Dot, Christophe Guinet, John PY Arnould, John R. Speakman and Andrew W. Trites

      Accepted manuscript online: 9 AUG 2016 09:49AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12729

  6. The ecology of de-extinction

    1. Reviews

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      A mammoth undertaking: harnessing insight from functional ecology to shape de-extinction priority setting

      Douglas J. McCauley, Molly Hardesty-Moore, Benjamin S. Halpern and Hillary S. Young

      Accepted manuscript online: 3 AUG 2016 07:55AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12728

    2. You have free access to this content
      De-extinction and evolution

      Alexandre Robert, Charles Thévenin, Karine Princé, François Sarrazin and Joanne Clavel

      Accepted manuscript online: 3 AUG 2016 07:45AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12723

  7. Standard Papers

    1. Physiological regulation and efficient xylem water transport regulate diurnal water and carbon balances of tropical lianas

      Ya-Jun Chen, Stefan A. Schnitzer, Yong-Jiang Zhang, Ze-Xin Fan, Guillermo Goldstein, Kyle W. Tomlinson, Hua Lin, Jiao-Lin Zhang and Kun-Fang Cao

      Accepted manuscript online: 2 AUG 2016 09:40AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12724

    2. Adaptation to heat stress reduces phenotypic and transcriptional plasticity in a marine copepod

      Morgan. W. Kelly, M. Sabrina Pankey, Melissa .B. DeBiasse and David.C. Plachetzki

      Accepted manuscript online: 2 AUG 2016 09:40AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12725

    3. A global method for calculating plant CSR ecological strategies applied across biomes worldwide

      Simon Pierce, Daniel Negreiros, Bruno E.L. Cerabolini, Jens Kattge, Sandra Díaz, Michael Kleyer, Bill Shipley, S. Joseph Wright, Nadejda A. Soudzilovskaia, Vladimir G. Onipchenko, Peter M. van Bodegom, Cedric Frenette-Dussault, Evan Weiher, Bruno X. Pinho, Johannes H.C. Cornelissen, J. Philip Grime, Ken Thompson, Roderick Hunt, Peter J. Wilson, Gabriella Buffa, Oliver C. Nyakunga, Peter B. Reich, Marco Caccianiga, Federico Mangili, Roberta M. Ceriani, Alessandra Luzzaro, Guido Brusa, Andrew Siefert, Newton P.U. Barbosa, F. Stuart Chapin III, William K. Cornwell, Jingyun Fang, G. Wilson Fernandes, Eric Garnier, Soizig Le Stradic, Josep Peñuelas, Felipe P. L. Melo, Antonio Slaviero, Marcelo Tabarelli and Duccio Tampucci

      Accepted manuscript online: 2 AUG 2016 09:35AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12722

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A vast range of plant biodiversity exists on Earth, with each species characterised by a particular suite of morphological traits. However, not all traits affect survival and many operate only during brief moments of the life-cycle. Plants exhibit a surprisingly limited number of basic ways in which they can use available resources to grow and persevere: differences in plant size affect the outcome of competition, and differences in the ‘economics’ of how plants invest resources – in individual robustness or in reproduction – determine how plant populations persist during environmental difficulties. Much of biodiversity represents variation around these general themes, or primary ‘strategies’.

      Certain size and economics traits that can represent primary functioning, such as leaf size and aspects of photosynthetic tissue density, have now been measured around the world and can potentially provide a global framework within which strategies can be measured and compared. These absolute limits are used here to develop a tool for plant strategy classification, grounded in a theory of plant strategies (competitor, stress-tolerator, ruderal, or ‘CSR’, theory).

      As plant adaptation within different geographic regions is intimately linked to climate (particularly temperature and seasonal water availability) there is reason to expect plant strategies to vary at the largest scales, between bioclimatic regions or biomes. The global CSR analysis method was used to analyse the range and character of plant strategies in all 14 major biome classes worldwide. The results did demonstrate differences in functional specialisation between biomes but also detailed a large amount of variability within biomes, probably due to the presence of contrasting habitats and plant communities within each one. However, it is clear that the global ‘CSR analysis’ tool presented here is valid for the functional description of plant species and communities worldwide, and can provide plant ecologists working in different habitats and biomes with a lingua franca equivalent to taxonomists’ use of Latin.

    4. Importance of deep water uptake in tropical eucalypt forest

      Mathias Christina, Yann Nouvellon, Jean-Paul Laclau, Jose L. Stape, Jean-Pierre Bouillet, George R. Lambais and Guerric le Maire

      Accepted manuscript online: 2 AUG 2016 09:35AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12727

    5. Experimental warming in a dryland community reduced plant photosynthesis and soil CO2 efflux although the relationship between the fluxes remained unchanged

      Timothy M. Wertin, Jayne Belnap and Sasha C. Reed

      Accepted manuscript online: 30 JUN 2016 01:40AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12708

  8. FE Spotlight

    1. You have free access to this content
      Emigration is costly but immigration has benefits in human-altered landscapes

      Barry W. Brook and Jessie C. Buettel

      Accepted manuscript online: 27 JAN 2016 09:51AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12639

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