Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 83 Issue 4

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Ken Wilson, Tim Coulson, Jean-Michel Gaillard and Ben Sheldon

Impact Factor: 4.841

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2012: 1/151 (Zoology); 20/136 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 1365-2656

Associated Title(s): Functional Ecology, Journal of Applied Ecology, Journal of Ecology, Methods in Ecology and Evolution

VIEW

  1. 1 - 60
  1. Standard Papers

    1. Experimental manipulation of female reproduction demonstrates its fitness costs in kangaroos

      Uriel Gélin, Michelle E. Wilson, Graeme Coulson and Marco Festa-Bianchet

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12266

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      By combining the first experimental manipulation of reproductive effort in wild marsupials with long-term monitoring of multiple populations, the authors quantify the fitness consequences of reproduction.

    2. Species undersampling in tropical bat surveys: effects on emerging biodiversity patterns

      Christoph F. J. Meyer, Ludmilla M. S. Aguiar, Luis F. Aguirre, Julio Baumgarten, Frank M. Clarke, Jean-François Cosson, Sergio Estrada Villegas, Jakob Fahr, Deborah Faria, Neil Furey, Mickaël Henry, Richard K. B. Jenkins, Thomas H. Kunz, M. Cristina MacSwiney González, Isabel Moya, Jean-Marc Pons, Paul A. Racey, Katja Rex, Erica M. Sampaio, Kathryn E. Stoner, Christian C. Voigt, Dietrich von Staden, Christa D. Weise and Elisabeth K. V. Kalko

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12261

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      This study explores inferential bias associated with species undersampling in tropical bat surveys. The authors demonstrate the potential as well as the limitations for reducing survey effort and streamlining sampling protocols, and consequently for increasing cost-effectiveness in tropical bat surveys or monitoring programs. Photo credit: C.F.J. Meyer.

    3. Fitness prospects: effects of age, sex and recruitment age on reproductive value in a long-lived seabird

      He Zhang, Maren Rebke, Peter H. Becker and Sandra Bouwhuis

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12259

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      This paper investigates intraspecific variation in reproductive values due to age, sex and recruitment age in a long-lived seabird. It demonstrates that sex and RA affect underlying fitness traits, but that only age effects on fitness traits translate to variation in reproductive values.

    4. Ecological causes of multilevel covariance between size and first-year survival in a wild bird population

      Sandra Bouwhuis, Oscar Vedder, Colin J. Garroway and Ben C. Sheldon

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12264

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      The paper demonstrates how correlations between traits, fitness and environment influence estimates of selection, and shows how partitioning trait-effects between levels of selection and environmental factors is a promising approach to identify potential agents of selection.

    5. Life-history trade-offs mediate ‘personality’ variation in two colour morphs of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum

      Wiebke Schuett, Sasha R. X. Dall, Michaela H. Kloesener, Jana Baeumer, Felix Beinlich and Till Eggers

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12263

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      Here the authors investigate whether life-history trade-offs mediate personality variation in escape responses in different colour morphs of pea aphids. The results show that, under strong trade-offs, organisms who commit to particular lifestyles (being consistent) maximise their fitness.

    6. Ecological generalism and behavioural innovation in birds: technical intelligence or the simple incorporation of new foods?

      Simon Ducatez, Joanne Clavel and Louis Lefebvre

      Article first published online: 9 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12255

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      We show that the ecological generalist advantage in front of current environmental change might be related to habitat generalists being better able to incorporate new types of food in their diet. In addition, we show that diet breadth and cognition are associated, suggesting that diet breadth and cognition co-evolved.

    7. A continental scale trophic cascade from wolves through coyotes to foxes

      Thomas M. Newsome and William J. Ripple

      Article first published online: 9 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12258

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      We show that the extirpation of wolves throughout North America has caused a continent-wide shift in coyote and red fox densities. To reverse this human induced cascade, wolves may need to occur continuously over large spatial areas. This presents a challenge because wolves are frequently persecuted due to human-wildlife conflicts.

    8. Impacts of breeder loss on social structure, reproduction and population growth in a social canid

      Bridget L. Borg, Scott M. Brainerd, Thomas J. Meier and Laura R. Prugh

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12256

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      This paper quantitatively evaluates how the death of reproductive individuals in socially complex canid species could affect social group cohesion and population growth.

    9. Overcompensation and phase effects in a cyclic common vole population: between first and second-order cycles

      Frédéric Barraquand, Adrien Pinot, Nigel G. Yoccoz and Vincent Bretagnolle

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12257

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      The density-dependence of annual growth rates is crucial to explain population cycles. Nonlinear models show why the density of the year, rather than the density a year ago as usually assumed, is most important to common vole cyclic dynamics. It suggests in turn novel potential causes for common vole cycles.

    10. Trait-based diet selection: prey behaviour and morphology predict vulnerability to predation in reef fish communities

      Stephanie J. Green and Isabelle M. Côté

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12250

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      The authors describe a novel functional approach to studying diet selection and show that several behavioural and morphological traits exhibited by Caribbean reef fishes heighten vulnerability to predation by invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish nearly 200%.

    11. Allometric scaling of indirect effects: body size ratios predict non-consumptive effects in multi-predator systems

      Lauren Krenek and Volker H. W. Rudolf

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12254

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      Results indicate that models which assume that predators have independent effects on their prey are particularly likely to make erroneous predictions when predators differ substantially in size, but simple allometric relationships of NCEs could be used to correct this bias.

    12. Unravelling the annual cycle in a migratory animal: breeding-season habitat loss drives population declines of monarch butterflies

      D. T. Tyler Flockhart, Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt, D. Ryan Norris and Tara G. Martin

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12253

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      Threats to migratory animals occur at multiple periods of the annual cycle that are separated by thousands of kilometers and span international borders. Using a year-round population model, we show that population declines of monarch butterflies result from loss of breeding habitats in the United States, not from loss of wintering habitats in Mexico.

    13. Ecological divergence among colour morphs mediated by changes in spatial network structure associated with disturbance

      Matthew S. Lattanzio and Donald B. Miles

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12252

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      Our study provides unique insight into how environmental variation resulting from disturbance may interact with variation in individual behaviour to influence the spatial structuring of animal populations. We highlight some of the key social and ecological ramifications of this interaction for populations in resource-limited habitats.

  2. Forum

    1. Why is eusociality an almost exclusively terrestrial phenomenon?

      Graeme D. Ruxton, Stuart Humphries, Lesley J. Morrell and David M. Wilkinson

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12251

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      In this thought-provoking forum paper, the authors discuss the strange observation that while social insects such as ants, termites, bees and wasps play large roles in terrestrial ecosystems, truly social taxa are far less common in aquatic environments.

  3. Standard Papers

    1. Multi-taxa trait and functional responses to physical disturbance

      Scott M. Pedley and Paul M. Dolman

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12249

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      This is the first study to contrast trait responses from two diverse terrestrial arthropod groups to those of vascular plants, along a single environmental gradient. The authors show that generalizations of trait response across taxa should be cautious as responses vary among taxa.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Growth trajectory influences temperature preference in fish through an effect on metabolic rate

      Shaun S. Killen

      Article first published online: 17 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12244

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      This study demonstrates for the first time that dietary history and growth trajectory influence preferred temperatures of fish, with the underlying cause being the effect of compensatory growth on individual metabolic rate. As a consequence, even in regularly growing fish, increased resting metabolic demand causes a preference for cooler environments

    3. The number of competitor species is unlinked to sexual dimorphism

      Shai Meiri, Amy E. Kadison, Maria Novosolov, Panayiotis Pafilis, Johannes Foufopoulos, Yuval Itescu, Pasquale Raia and Daniel Pincheira-Donoso

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12248

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      Sexual size dimorphism within three lizard species does not change with the number of putative competitors they face on different-sized islands in the Aegean Sea. We found, counter to expected ecological theory, sexual dimorphism does not diminish as guilds acquire more species.

    4. Prevalence and beta diversity in avian malaria communities: host species is a better predictor than geography

      Elizabeth S. C. Scordato and Melissa R. Kardish

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12246

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      This paper uses measures of phylogenetic and community beta diversity to show that host species is a better predictor of malaria community turnover than site, providing no evidence for a distance–decay relationship in these parasite communities.

    5. Variation in abundance of nectarivorous birds: does a competitive despot interfere with flower tracking?

      Joanne M. Bennett, Rohan H. Clarke, James R. Thomson and Ralph Mac Nally

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12245

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      Nectarivores track spatial and temporal variation in flowering but altered patterns of interspecific competition, driven by fragmentation and climate-induced vegetation degradation, deflect the distribution of small-bodied nectarivorous birds from an ‘ideal free distribution’ to an ‘ideal despotic distribution’.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Parasites and genetic diversity in an invasive bumblebee

      Catherine M. Jones and Mark J. F. Brown

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12235

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      Using an ecologically and economically important genus of pollinators as a model system, the authors ask how enemy release, at the level of parasite communities and real parasite impact, and functional genetic diversity, contribute to the invasion success of a non-native bumblebee in the United Kingdom.

    7. Effects of spatial structure of population size on the population dynamics of barnacles across their elevational range

      Keiichi Fukaya, Takehiro Okuda, Masahiro Nakaoka and Takashi Noda

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12234

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      This study explores the variability–range relationship of population size by analysing long-term data of intertidal barnacles collected over their vertical range. Results show a tendency that populations are variable at range margins due to increased stochastic fluctuation in growth rate, as well as an association between population size and its variability.

    8. Year-round effects of climate on demographic parameters of an arctic-nesting goose species

      Louise van Oudenhove, Gilles Gauthier and Jean-Dominique Lebreton

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12230

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      Understanding how climate changes affect animal populations remains a major challenge, especially in arctic-nesting migratory birds exposed to different climatic regimes. With a 23-year data set, this study highlights how temperatures encountered throughout the annual cycle affect the vital rates of the greater snow geese.

    9. Mate finding, Allee effects and selection for sex-biased dispersal

      Allison K. Shaw and Hanna Kokko

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12232

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      This article resolves contradicting predictions from the mate search and dispersal literatures about correlation between male and female dispersal and demonstrates that sex bias in dispersal depends on when mating occurs during the dispersal process.

    10. Exotic birds increase generalization and compensate for native bird decline in plant–frugivore assemblages

      Daniel García, Daniel Martínez, Daniel B. Stouffer and Jason M. Tylianakis

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12237

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      This study shows that the stronger the integration of exotic birds in the frugivore assemblages of New Zealand, the higher the degree of generalization of plant–frugivore networks. By diversifying the frugivore guild for native plants, exotic birds may increase the resilience of seed dispersal against native bird extinction (Artwork by Daniel Martinez).

    11. Does variation in the intensity and duration of predation drive evolutionary changes in senescence?

      Matthew R. Walsh, Deirdre Whittington and Melissa J. Walsh

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12247

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      This is a rare test of the evolutionary theory of senescence, evaluating the importance of predation on ageing and showing that increased mortality does not select for faster ageing. Such results challenge our current understanding of the importance of predation on senescence.

    12. Special structures of hoopoe eggshells enhance the adhesion of symbiont-carrying uropygial secretion that increase hatching success

      Manuel Martín-Vivaldi, Juan J. Soler, Juan M. Peralta-Sánchez, Laura Arco, Antonio M. Martín-Platero, Manuel Martínez-Bueno, Magdalena Ruiz-Rodríguez and Eva Valdivia

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12243

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      This study provides strong evidence of a mutualistic association between hoopoes and antibiotic producing bacteria, whereby the bacteria protect embryos against infection.

    13. Temperature-dependent variation in alternative migratory tactics and its implications for fitness and population dynamics in a salmonid fish

      Kentaro Morita, Tsuyoshi Tamate, Mari Kuroki and Toru Nagasawa

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12240

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      This study showed that the proportion of male masu salmon exhibiting migratory behavior decreased with increasing temperature. Additionally, the occurrence of delayed age at migration decreased with increasing temperature. These responses to increased temperature are explained by an adaptation to maximize fitness.

    14. Forest structure drives global diversity of primates

      Sidney F. Gouveia, Fabricio Villalobos, Ricardo Dobrovolski, Raone Beltrão-Mendes and Stephen F. Ferrari

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12241

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      This study provides a novel account on the likely causes of the global pattern of primate species richness, namely the vertical forest structure, thus challenging previous hypothesis based on levels of rainfall or productivity.

    15. Density-dependent intraspecific aggression regulates survival in northern Yellowstone wolves (Canis lupus)

      Sarah Cubaynes, Daniel R. MacNulty, Daniel R. Stahler, Kira A. Quimby, Douglas W. Smith and Tim Coulson

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12238

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      This article provides empirical support for the hypothesis that intrinsic density-dependent mechanisms might regulate territorial carnivore populations at high ungulate densities.

    16. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Survival in macaroni penguins and the relative importance of different drivers: individual traits, predation pressure and environmental variability

      Catharine Horswill, Jason Matthiopoulos, Jonathan A. Green, Michael P. Meredith, Jaume Forcada, Helen Peat, Mark Preston, Phil N. Trathan and Norman Ratcliffe

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12229

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      Understanding the factors that explain changes in survival rates is central to population ecology. This is the first seabird demography study to use mark–recapture modelling approaches to simultaneously consider and demonstrate the influence of multiple regulatory effects and assess their relative importance across different life stages.

    17. Ectoparasitism and stress hormones: strategy of host exploitation, common host–parasite history and energetics matter

      Justin R. St. Juliana, Irina S. Khokhlova, Nadja Wielebnowski, Burt P. Kotler and Boris R. Krasnov

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12217

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      This study is novel in investigating the impacts of ectoparasites on stress hormones in small mammals. The authors find that strategy of host exploitation, common host–parasite history and energetics all influence the stress hormones of a host.

    18. Disentangling the effects of exposure and susceptibility on transmission of the zoonotic parasite Schistosoma mansoni

      David J. Civitello and Jason R. Rohr

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12222

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      Here, the authors develop mechanistic disease transmission models to separate exposure and susceptibility and enhance predictions of the spread of a human zoonotic disease in its wildlife hosts. This approach could improve predictions of human risk and be applied to many host–parasite disease systems.

    19. A trophic cascade induced by predatory ants in a fig–fig wasp mutualism

      Bo Wang, Xiang-Zong Geng, Li-Bin Ma, James M. Cook and Rui-Wu Wang

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12219

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      This paper reports a trophic cascade induced by weaver ants on a fig–fig wasp mutualism. We show that predation by weaver ants limits the success of the non-pollinating wasp and therefore indirectly benefits the mutualism by increasing the reproductive success of both the pollinator and the plant. Predation is therefore a key functional factor that shapes the community structure of a multi-species mutualistic system and determines its functioning.

    20. Let's go beyond taxonomy in diet description: testing a trait-based approach to prey–predator relationships

      Jérôme Spitz, Vincent Ridoux and Anik Brind'Amour

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12218

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      Here the authors demonstrate the utility of a trait-based method that is that original for dietary data and opens a new avenue to investigate predator-prey relationships and aspects of prey selection of wild fauna

    21. Community-level demographic consequences of urbanization: an ecological network approach

      Amanda D. Rodewald, Rudolf P. Rohr, Miguel A. Fortuna and Jordi Bascompte

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12224

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      This paper is the first to establish a link between population demography of several species and network structure. The authors demonstrate that demographic variation among populations can be explained only by using networks, not with traditional ecological predictors, including numbers of predators, landscape composition and habitat structure.

    22. The effect of fire on habitat selection of mammalian herbivores: the role of body size and vegetation characteristics

      Stephanie L. Eby, T. Michael Anderson, Emilian P. Mayemba and Mark E. Ritchie

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12221

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      This paper is one of the first to intensively study reasons for herbivore preference of burned areas. Additionally, it explores how long impacts of burning affect herbivore distributions, which is important given the large roles that herbivores and fire play in savanna and grassland ecosystems.

    23. Linking body mass and group dynamics in an obligate cooperative breeder

      Arpat Ozgul, Andrew W. Bateman, Sinead English, Tim Coulson and Tim H. Clutton-Brock

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12239

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      By applying an individual- and trait-based population model to an exceptional life-history data set, the authors reveal the mechanisms through which environmental and social factors affect the group dynamics of a cooperatively breeding mammal.

    24. Trait-mediated functional responses: predator behavioural type mediates prey consumption

      Benjamin J. Toscano and Blaine D. Griffen

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12236

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      Consistent individual variation in behaviour (i.e. behavioural types) is ubiquitous in predator populations, but the effects of behavioural types on the functional response remain uninvestigated. This study demonstrates size-dependent effects of individual crab activity level on the crab functional response to mussel prey density.

    25. Dual fuels: intra-annual variation in the relative importance of benthic and pelagic resources to maintenance, growth and reproduction in a generalist salmonid fish

      Brian Hayden, Chris Harrod and Kimmo K. Kahilainen

      Article first published online: 15 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12233

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      This study highlights the dual importance of benthic invertebrates, which fuel winter survival, and pelagic zooplankton, which fuels summer growth, to the annual development of generalist fish. These results represent an important contribution to the ongoing debate regarding the relative importance of benthic and pelagic productivity to lake food webs.

    26. The smell of good food: volatile infochemicals as resource quality indicators

      Jana Moelzner and Patrick Fink

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12220

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      The authors demonstrate for the first time that an herbivorous consumer can evaluate a resource's dietary quality over a distance. The observed foraging behaviour clearly shows that gastropods are able to perceive and distinguish chemical cues released from a resource as food quality indicators. Credit: Dr. Lars Peters, www.blueseapictures.de.

    27. Ant functional responses along environmental gradients

      Xavier Arnan, Xim Cerdá and Javier Retana

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12227

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      Relationships among traits, function and the environment are poorly understood in animals, where large databases are hardly available. This study is one of the first to analyse changes in a large number of animal functional traits along wide and different environmental gradients concurrently.

    28. Body size, carry-over effects and survival in a seasonal environment: consequences for population dynamics

      Gustavo S. Betini, Cortland K. Griswold, Livia Prodan and D. Ryan Norris

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12225

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      Most populations live in seasonal environments, yet the implications of seasonality on population dynamics are not well understood. Here, we used a model system to show how variation in parental breeding density carries over to influence offspring survival during the non-breeding season and how this can stabilize long-term population dynamics.

    29. Cheetahs and wild dogs show contrasting patterns of suppression by lions

      Alexandra Swanson, Tim Caro, Harriet Davies-Mostert, Michael G. L. Mills, David W. Macdonald, Markus Borner, Emmanuel Masenga and Craig Packer

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12231

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      African lions have contrasting effects on populations of cheetahs and wild dogs. Lions do not suppress cheetah populations despite inflicting considerable cub mortality, but their impacts on wild dogs are greater than previously supposed, explaining the disappearance of the iconic Serengeti dog population. Fine-scale avoidance behavior may allow apex-mesopredator coexistence.

    30. Predator avoidance during reproduction: diel movements by spawning sockeye salmon between stream and lake habitats

      Kale T. Bentley, Daniel E. Schindler, Timothy J. Cline, Jonathan B. Armstrong, Daniel Macias, Lindsy R. Ciepiela and Ray Hilborn

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12223

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      Animals often face habitat-mediated trade-offs between reproductive success and predation risk. This study provides one of the first examples of individuals exploiting fine-scale habitat heterogeneity during reproduction through daily cyclic movements, which appears to be a strategy used by salmon to reduce predation risk by their principal predator, brown bears.

    31. Predictors of malaria infection in a wild bird population: landscape-level analyses reveal climatic and anthropogenic factors

      Catalina Gonzalez-Quevedo, Richard G. Davies and David S. Richardson

      Article first published online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12214

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      This paper explores the role of fine-scale environmental variation on the distribution of a wildlife disease. Interestingly, the authors find a key role for a climatic variable previously described as an important predictor of malaria, but also find an effect of anthropogenic variables.

    32. Life-history diversity and its importance to population stability and persistence of a migratory fish: steelhead in two large North American watersheds

      Jonathan W. Moore, Justin D. Yeakel, Dean Peard, Jeff Lough and Mark Beere

      Article first published online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12212

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      The authors analyse life-history trajectories of an iconic migratory fish in large and relatively pristine watersheds, discovering an astonishing 36 different life histories. Via portfolio effects, this diversity increases stability in this era of rising variability.

    33. Dispersal-mediated effect of microhabitat availability and density dependence determine population dynamics of a forest floor web spider

      Mayura B. Takada and Tadashi Miyashita

      Article first published online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12213

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      The authors provide novel integrative evidence that fragmentation paradigm and density-dependent paradigm in population dynamics could operate in a particular system, using populations of a web spider.

    34. An evolutionary perspective on reproductive individual heterogeneity in a marine vertebrate

      Thierry Chambert, Jay J. Rotella and Robert A. Garrott

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12211

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      This study is the first to address the evolutionary consequences of individual reproductive heterogeneity in a long-lived vertebrate. Using Weddell seals as a model, the authors show that females producing more offspring do not trade off with the quality of their offspring and find evidence for heritability in female reproductive rates.

    35. Individual and sex-specific differences in intrinsic growth rate covary with consistent individual differences in behaviour

      Peter A. Biro, Bart Adriaenssens and Portia Sampson

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12210

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      Why individuals within a given population consistently differ in behaviour is an important question, given the lability of behaviour. Here, the authors show that individual differences in intrinsic growth rate are a strong predictor of behavioural differences that persist over several months.

    36. Habitat degradation is threatening reef replenishment by making fish fearless

      Oona M. Lönnstedt, Mark I. McCormick, Douglas P. Chivers and Maud C. O. Ferrari

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12209

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      In one of the world's most biologically diverse ecosystems, coral reefs, climate change is causing coral degradation. The authors find that recruitment and replenishment of reef fish will be affected by coral death via predation-mediated changes, as fish in dead habitats fail to respond to predators with severe consequences for survival.

    37. Heterogeneous hosts: how variation in host size, behaviour and immunity affects parasite aggregation

      Pieter T. J. Johnson and Jason T. Hoverman

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12215

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      Despite the ubiquity of parasite aggregation, experimental studies investigating the proposed drivers of such variation or their interactions remain rare. By combining field surveys with controlled experiments, the authors show that only manipulations of host behaviour – and not size or immunity – reproduce infection heterogeneity comparable to field patterns.

    38. Frequent and seasonally variable sublethal anthrax infections are accompanied by short-lived immunity in an endemic system

      Carrie A. Cizauskas, Steven E. Bellan, Wendy C. Turner, Russell E. Vance and Wayne M. Getz

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12207

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      Here, the authors examine anthrax hosts in a natural system and find that herbivores are capable of surviving anthrax, with zebras contracting sublethal anthrax at a very high rate. The study also helps to establish more rigourous protocols for running and interpreting ELISAs, a very commonly used assay in immunological ecology.

    39. Immigrants are attracted by local pre-breeders and recruits in a seabird colony

      K. Lesley Szostek, Michael Schaub and Peter H. Becker

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12206

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      The authors estimate annual immigration rates in a common tern colony, using Bayesian modelling based on long-term individual life-history data. They find that immigration is the most important driver of colony growth, and its driving force is young first-time breeders, attracted to the colony by the presence of potential mates.

    40. Ecological opportunities and intraspecific competition alter trophic niche specialization in an opportunistic stream predator

      Charlotte Evangelista, Anatole Boiche, Antoine Lecerf and Julien Cucherousset

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12208

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      This study describes how human-induced disturbances (i.e. forestry management), by modifying ecological opportunities, impact the trophic ecology of an aquatic predator. Based on longitudinal monitoring of individuals and stable isotope analyses, it provides a rare empirical evidence that trophic specialization can be indirectly driven by ecological opportunities through strengthened intraspecific competition.

    41. Linking phenological shifts to species interactions through size-mediated priority effects

      Nick L. Rasmussen, Benjamin G. Van Allen and Volker H. W. Rudolf

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12203

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      Shifts in phenological timing can occur due to interannual variation in seasonal weather patterns as well as anthropogenic climate change, but the consequences for species interactions remain poorly understood. Using an experimental approach, this study demonstrates that phenological shifts can alter not only interaction strength but also demographic rates of species and community structure through a mechanism called size-mediated priority effects, in which individuals that arrive earlier can achieve a body size advantage over those that arrive later.

    42. Using dynamic Brownian bridge movement modelling to measure temporal patterns of habitat selection

      Michael E. Byrne, J. Clint McCoy, Joseph W. Hinton, Michael J. Chamberlain and Bret A. Collier

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12205

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      The authors use the dynamic Brownian bridge motion model to estimate space use of an animal between individual GPS telemetry locations based on movement behaviour and show how that information can be used to investigate fine-scale temporal variation in habitat use.

    43. Greater migratory propensity in hosts lowers pathogen transmission and impacts

      Richard J. Hall, Sonia Altizer and Rebecca A. Bartel

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12204

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      This is the first theoretical demonstration that long-distance migration can lower pathogen transmission and impacts, with implications for predicting and managing pathogen threats in imperilled migratory species.

    44. Evidence of localized resource depletion following a natural colonization event by a large marine predator

      Carey E. Kuhn, Jason D. Baker, Rodney G. Towell and Rolf R. Ream

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12202

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      By taking advantage of a rare colonization event, this study examined the impact of population growth on the foraging behaviour of a large marine predator. As the population increase 4-fold, northern fur seals were required to allot increasing effort to obtain prey as a result of localized resource depletion.

    45. A critical examination of indices of dynamic interaction for wildlife telemetry studies

      Jed A. Long, Trisalyn A. Nelson, Stephen L. Webb and Kenneth L. Gee

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12198

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      The authors compare currently available techniques for detecting interactive behaviour – termed dynamic interaction-when multiple animals are tracked simultaneously (e.g. GPS collars). A recently developed metric for looking at local-level changes in interactive behaviour is highlighted.

    46. Multiple dimensions of bat biodiversity along an extensive tropical elevational gradient

      Laura M. Cisneros, Kevin R. Burgio, Lindsay M. Dreiss, Brian T. Klingbeil, Bruce D. Patterson, Steven J. Presley and Michael R. Willig

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12201

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      This study demonstrates that species richness is not always an effective surrogate of phylogenetic or functional dimensions of biodiversity. Deviations of phylogenetic or functional dispersion from that expected based on species richness suggest that competitive exclusion and abiotic filtering operate simultaneously on different aspects of bat assemblages at high elevations. Photo credit: L.M. Cisneros.

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