Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 85 Issue 3

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Ken Wilson, Ben Sheldon, Jean-Michel Gaillard and Nate Sanders

Impact Factor: 4.504

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 2/154 (Zoology); 21/145 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 1365-2656

Associated Title(s): Functional Ecology, Journal of Applied Ecology, Journal of Ecology, Methods in Ecology and Evolution

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  1. 1 - 26
  1. Standard Papers

    1. Experimental evidence for fundamental, and not realized, niche partitioning in a plant–herbivore community interaction network

      Willem J. Augustyn, Bruce Anderson and Allan G. Ellis

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12536

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      The authors demonstrated that a community of herbivorous insects is not structured by current biological interactions. This finding suggests that patterns of resource use in biological communities might primarily be the outcome of evolutionary processes occurring over long time frames.

    2. Interactions between plants and primates shape community diversity in a rainforest in Madagascar

      James P. Herrera

      Version of Record online: 23 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12532

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      How do species interact with each other and their environment to form communities? The authors tested if competition or resource limitation explain the assembly of primate communities in Madagascar by quantifying the relationships between functional and evolutionary differences among species and their environment. Food abundance was most important in community assembly.

    3. The challenges of the first migration: movement and behaviour of juvenile vs. adult white storks with insights regarding juvenile mortality

      Shay Rotics, Michael Kaatz, Yehezkel S. Resheff, Sondra Feldman Turjeman, Damaris Zurell, Nir Sapir, Ute Eggers, Andrea Flack, Wolfgang Fiedler, Florian Jeltsch, Martin Wikelski and Ran Nathan

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12525

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      In long-distance migrating birds, juveniles must cope with strenuous and risky journeys shortly after fledging incurring high juvenile mortality. The authors found that juvenile storks had significantly lower flight efficiency, using costly flapping flight more frequently than adults. Furthermore, juveniles with lower flight efficiency exhibited higher mortality rates.

    4. Phylogenetic community structure of North American desert bats: influence of environment at multiple spatial and taxonomic scales

      Lorelei E. Patrick and Richard D. Stevens

      Version of Record online: 16 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12529

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      The authors found that environmental conditions are important predictors of phylogenetic community structure of North American desert bats, but the importance of particular variables differed by desert. This suggests that these communities are likely structured by habitat filtering and that similar patterns of community structure were driven by different environmental conditions.

    5. Good reasons to leave home: proximate dispersal cues in a social spider

      Reut Berger-Tal, Na'ama Berner-Aharon, Shlomi Aharon, Cristina Tuni and Yael Lubin

      Version of Record online: 16 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12534

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      By manipulating foraging conditions, the authors increased individual dispersal in a cooperative breeding spiders. They conclude that dispersal is highly sensitive to short-term changes in local conditions, and sociality in spiders is maintained by both costs of dispersal and benefits of cooperation.

    6. Fight-flight or freeze-hide? Personality and metabolic phenotype mediate physiological defence responses in flatfish

      Emmanuel J. Rupia, Sandra A. Binning, Dominique G. Roche and Weiqun Lu

      Version of Record online: 16 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12524

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      Animals have different strategies for dealing with danger, but the physiological mechanisms responsible for choosing an active vs. passive defense response are unclear. The authors show that the type (flee vs. freeze) rather than the magnitude of the behavioural and physiological response to a threat differs between bold and shy individuals.

    7. Energy storage and fecundity explain deviations from ecological stoichiometry predictions under global warming and size-selective predation

      Chao Zhang, Mieke Jansen, Luc De Meester and Robby Stoks

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12531

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      This paper demonstrates that global warming and size-selective predation risk can independently shape Daphnia magna body stoichiometry, which are largely driven by changes in energy storage molecules. Also, the trade-offs between energy storage and rapid development and the increased investment in fecundity under size-selective predation could explain deviations from ecological stoichiometry predictions. Photo credit: Joachim Mergeay.

    8. Widespread correlations between climatic niche evolution and species diversification in birds

      Christopher R. Cooney, Nathalie Seddon and Joseph A. Tobias

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12530

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      Widespread correlations between rates of climatic niche evolution and diversification in birds imply that adaptation to novel climatic conditions represents a fundamental process regulating the link between climate and biodiversity at global scales, irrespective of the geographical and ecological context of speciation and extinction.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Antagonistic interactions between an invasive alien and a native coccinellid species may promote coexistence

      William T. Hentley, Adam J. Vanbergen, Andrew P. Beckerman, Melanie N. Brien, Rosemary S. Hails, T. Hefin Jones and Scott N. Johnson

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12519

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      The authors demonstrate how competition between native and invasive coccinellids induces plastic changes in the feeding rate of two species; a previously undocumented behavioural response in coccinellids. These results are incorporated into a well-established population dynamic model, revealing how a seemingly innocuous change in feeding behaviour might influence the invasion process.

    10. Experimental parasite community ecology: intraspecific variation in a large tapeworm affects community assembly

      Daniel P. Benesh and Martin Kalbe

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12527

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      Hosts often harbour multiple parasite species, some of which may co-occur more or less frequently than expected by chance. Using a combination of laboratory and field experiments, the authors found that the non-random associations between parasite species can be contingent on variation within a species.

  2. Corrigendum

    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12520

      This article corrects:
  3. Standard Papers

    1. Refining mimicry: phenotypic variation tracks the local optimum

      Claire Mérot, Yann Le Poul, Marc Théry and Mathieu Joron

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12521

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      This study quantifies resemblance in wing hue, pattern and shape between butterfly comimics and shows that a rare comimic tracks the changes in the mimicry optimum. It provides one of the first empirical descriptions of mimicry refinement in nature and insights into the evolution of intraspecific diversity in warnings signals.

    2. Foraging modality and plasticity in foraging traits determine the strength of competitive interactions among carnivorous plants, spiders and toads

      David E. Jennings, James J. Krupa and Jason R. Rohr

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12526

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      The authors used a long-term experiment to examine competitive interactions among a functionally diverse guild of generalist predators (pink sundews, funnel-web-building wolf spiders, and oak toads). Their findings highlight the importance of foraging modality on the outcome of competition, and have implications for our understanding of the processes structuring communities.

    3. Colonization history and clonal richness of asexual Daphnia in periglacial habitats of contrasting age in West Greenland

      Tsegazeabe H. Haileselasie, Joachim Mergeay, Lawrence J. Weider, Erik Jeppesen and Luc De Meester

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12513

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      The authors analysed clonal richness and diversity in populations of the water flea Daphnia inhabiting periglacial ponds and lakes created by glacial retreat in western Greenland and show that, irrespective of habitat size, habitats are within decades colonized by multiple clones, implying high dispersal rates in these novel landscapes.

    4. Predator swamping reduces predation risk during nocturnal migration of juvenile salmon in a high-mortality landscape

      Nathan B. Furey, Scott G. Hinch, Arthur L. Bass, Collin T. Middleton, Vanessa Minke-Martin and Andrew G. Lotto

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12528

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      Ecologists have long understood the theoretical advantages of animals migrating in high densities to swamp predators, but empirical evidence is largely lacking. Predation risk of juvenile sockeye salmon smolts migrating downstream in a high-risk riverine landscape was found to be strongly density dependent. Thus, migration synchronization indeed reduces risk of predation.

    5. Larval traits carry over to affect post-settlement behaviour in a common coral reef fish

      Andrea L. Dingeldein and J. Wilson White

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12506

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      Early life-history (ELH) traits are known to influence survival in reef fish during the transition from larva to adult. The authors found evidence linking larval ELH traits and post-settlement risk-taking behaviour in bluehead wrasse, providing a mechanistic basis for the strong selection on ELH traits reported for this species.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Food availability and predation risk, rather than intrinsic attributes, are the main factors shaping the reproductive decisions of a long-lived predator

      Sarah R. Hoy, Alexandre Millon, Steve J. Petty, D. Philip Whitfield and Xavier Lambin

      Version of Record online: 3 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12517

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      Many studies have examined the effect of food availability and predation risk on breeding decisions in isolation. In this study however we took a comprehensive approach and examined how both food availability, predation risk and attributes intrinsic to individuals interacted to shape reproductive decisions. We also provide some empirical evidence to suggest that long-lived predators alter their life-history strategies in response to changes in multiple interacting environmental factors.

    7. Does primary productivity modulate the indirect effects of large herbivores? A global meta-analysis

      Joshua H. Daskin and Robert M. Pringle

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12522

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      The authors show that the strength of the effects of large mammalian herbivores (deer, antelope, elephants, etc.) on the abundance of other animals is greatest in the least productive ecosystems. Where climate change reduces primary productivity, the impacts of ongoing herbivore population declines and irruptions may be greatest.

    8. Family morph matters: factors determining survival and recruitment in a long-lived polymorphic raptor

      Petra Sumasgutner, Gareth J. Tate, Ann Koeslag and Arjun Amar

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12518

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      The authors study contributes new findings to two important topics in animal research: the maintenance of colour polymorphism and urban ecology. The authors use long-term data of urban black sparrowhawks to explore how the colour morphs of the parents (in isolation and in combination) influence key demographic parameters: offspring survival and recruitment.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Top predators negate the effect of mesopredators on prey physiology

      Maria M. Palacios, Shaun S. Killen, Lauren E. Nadler, James R. White and Mark I. McCormick

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12523

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      This study provides novel empirical evidence of a cascade of indirect effects in which low trophic-level species can benefit physiologically from the presence of top-predators, through the behavioural suppression imposed on mesopredators. Linking behavioural and physiological effects on predation risk can help unravel the mechanisms by which top-predators influence natural ecosystems.

    10. A test of the effects of timing of a pulsed resource subsidy on stream ecosystems

      Takuya Sato, Rana W. El-Sabaawi, Kirsten Campbell, Tamihisa Ohta and John S. Richardson

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12516

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      While most of the spatial subsidies are temporally variable, less is known about how the timing of these subsidies affects communities and ecosystems. Here, the authors demonstrate that the timing of a pulsed subsidy can mediate stream community and ecosystem functions predominantly through a timing-dependent consumer response.

    11. Negative relationships between population density and metabolic rates are not general

      Varvara Yashchenko, Erlend Ignacio Fossen, Øystein Nordeide Kielland and Sigurd Einum

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12515

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      Increased population density has been suggested to cause reduced metabolic rates even in the absence of food abundance effects. The authors find no such relationship in two species of zooplankton (Daphnia). Furthermore, when reviewing previous studies, such patterns are found to be weak or absent and/or potentially influenced by methodological bias.

    12. Host and parasite thermal acclimation responses depend on the stage of infection

      Karie A. Altman, Sara H. Paull, Pieter T. J. Johnson, Michelle N. Golembieski, Jeffrey P. Stephens, Bryan E. LaFonte and Thomas R. Raffel

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12510

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      Temperature variability can have complex effects on parasitism, particularly if hosts and parasites acclimate to new temperatures. The authors used replicated temperature experiments to demonstrate nonlinear thermal acclimation responses in the trematode parasite Ribeiroia ondatrae and its tadpole host Lithobates clamitans. They tracked parasite encystment and clearance using fluorescent dye.

    13. Beyond neutral and forbidden links: morphological matches and the assembly of mutualistic hawkmoth–plant networks

      Federico D. Sazatornil, Marcela Moré, Santiago Benitez-Vieyra, Andrea A. Cocucci, Ian J. Kitching, Boris O. Schlumpberger, Paulo E. Oliveira, Marlies Sazima and Felipe W. Amorim

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12509

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      The authors assessed whether hawkmoths more frequently visit plants with floral tube lengths similar to their proboscis lengths beyond abundance-based processes and ecological trait mismatches constraints. The findings highlight the importance of morphological traits matching, revealing that the role of niche-based processes can be much more complex than previously known.

    14. The contribution of developmental experience vs. condition to life history, trait variation and individual differences

      Nicholas DiRienzo and Pierre-Olivier Montiglio

      Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12512

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      The authors' findings demonstrate large and persistent effects of juvenile experience on later adult behavioural phenotype and web structure in black widow spiders. These differences in experience resulted in different patterns of behaviour and web personality in adult spiders. Furthermore, developmental experience also affects which traits demonstrated plasticity as adults.

    15. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Evidence of the phenotypic expression of a lethal recessive allele under inbreeding in a wild population of conservation concern

      Amanda E. Trask, Eric M. Bignal, Davy I. McCracken, Pat Monaghan, Stuart B. Piertney and Jane M. Reid

      Version of Record online: 21 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12503

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      The authors provide a rare example of the phenotypic expression of a single-locus lethal recessive allele in a wild population of conservation concern. Furthermore, they infer that the allele probably arose several generations ago and, despite being lethal, might persist due to high breeding success of heterozygous carriers.

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