Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 85 Issue 6

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Ken Wilson, Ben Sheldon, Jean-Michel Gaillard and Nate Sanders

Impact Factor: 4.827

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 2/161 (Zoology); 18/150 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 1365-2656

Associated Title(s): Functional Ecology, Journal of Applied Ecology, Journal of Ecology, Methods in Ecology and Evolution

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  1. Standard Papers

    1. You have free access to this content
      Shrub encroachment is linked to extirpation of an apex predator

      Christopher E. Gordon, David J. Eldridge, William J. Ripple, Mathew S. Crowther, Ben D. Moore and Mike Letnic

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12607

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      Shrub cover has increased throughout Earth's rangelands. The authors propose a novel model accounting for this ‘shrub encroachment’: trophic cascades induced by apex predator extirpation facilitate shrub recruitment and success. GIS tools, field data and statistical techniques are used to test this model in arid Australia.

    2. Intraspecific priority effects modify compensatory responses to changes in hatching phenology in an amphibian

      Andrea P. Murillo-Rincón, Nora A. Kolter, Anssi Laurila and Germán Orizaola

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12605

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      The study shows the complexities of ecological interactions in a scenario of climate change, using amphibians as study models.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Earlier nesting by generalist predatory bird is associated with human responses to climate change

      Shawn H. Smith, Karen Steenhof, Christopher J.W. McClure and Julie A. Heath

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12604

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      American kestrels, inhabiting a mosaic of habitats, nested earlier in response to earlier prey availability in agriculture, but not wildlands. Prey in agriculture were earlier because farmers planted crops earlier following warmer winters. This suggests an association between human adaptation to climate change and shifts in breeding phenology of wildlife.

    4. Decoupled diversity dynamics in green and brown webs during primary succession in a saltmarsh

      Maarten Schrama, Fons van der Plas, Matty P. Berg and Han Olff

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12602

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      It is currently unknown how green and brown food web diversity patterns are interlinked. Here, the authors demonstrate changes in species richness in green and brown trophic groups during 100 years of primary succession. The results show that along succession, green (vegetation-driven diversity) becomes uncoupled from brown (organic matter-driven) diversity.

    5. Fast–slow life history is correlated with individual differences in movements and prey selection in an aquatic predator in the wild

      Shinnosuke Nakayama, Tobias Rapp and Robert Arlinghaus

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12603

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      This study demonstrates a link between life history and behaviour in the wild. Perch with a fast life history were found to show risk-prone behaviour, such as prolonged activity, frequent activity changes and reliance on prey in riskier habitats, supporting that the pace-of-life syndrome extends to encompass behaviour.

    6. Sexual selection can both increase and decrease extinction probability: reconciling demographic and evolutionary factors

      Carlos Martínez-Ruiz and Robert J. Knell

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12601

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      Choosy females and males with bright or loud displays can change how a population responds to environmental stress. Large populations are made more resilient to stress, but small populations are more vulnerable.

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      African departure rather than migration speed determines variation in spring arrival in pied flycatchers

      Janne Ouwehand and Christiaan Both

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12599

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      Light-level geolocators revealed that African departure rather than migration speed determines variation in spring arrival in Dutch pied flycatchers. This implies that advancements in spring arrival to respond to environmental change at the breeding grounds require changes in spring departure from Africa, with little opportunity for faster migration.

  2. Allee Effects in Ecology and Evolution

    1. Genetic Allee effects and their interaction with ecological Allee effects

      Meike J. Wittmann, Hanna Stuis and Dirk Metzler

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12598

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      The modeling results indicate that inbreeding depression can produce a strong Allee effect where populations below a certain critical size tend to go extinct. Such genetic Allee effects can interact with ecological Allee effects, for example those due to mate-finding difficulties, to increase the extinction risk of small populations.

  3. ‘How to…’ Paper

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Accounting for genetic differences among unknown parents in microevolutionary studies: how to include genetic groups in quantitative genetic animal models

      Matthew E. Wolak and Jane M. Reid

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12597

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      Quantitative genetic ‘animal models’ are central to studies of adaptive evolution in wild populations. The authors show that unknown parents are ubiquitous in wild population pedigrees and can substantially bias animal model parameter estimates. The authors comprehensively demonstrate ‘how to’ implement ‘genetic group’ methods, which minimize bias and estimate key biological parameters.

  4. Standard Papers

    1. Sensitivity of UK butterflies to local climatic extremes: which life stages are most at risk?

      Osgur McDermott Long, Rachel Warren, Jeff Price, Tom M. Brereton, Marc S. Botham and Aldina M. A. Franco

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12594

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      This paper tackles a previously understudied field, addressing the impacts of extreme weather on biodiversity specifically butterflies in this study. It has used novel and dynamic approaches to identify extreme weather events which vary according to the life stage for each species and has identified some very interesting results.

  5. Corrigendum

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      Corrigendum

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12596

      This article corrects:
  6. Standard Papers

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Seasonal detours by soaring migrants shaped by wind regimes along the East Atlantic Flyway

      Wouter M. G. Vansteelant, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Willem van Manen, Jan van Diermen and Willem Bouten

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12593

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      Many migrating birds engage in seasonal detours during migration. The authors show how a Palearctic soaring migrant initiates a detour into a headwind at the start of spring migration in anticipation of tailwinds later on in its journey.

  7. Corrigendum

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      Corrigendum

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12595

      This article corrects:
  8. Standard Papers

    1. Modelling effects of nonbreeders on population growth estimates

      Aline M. Lee, Jane M. Reid and Steven R. Beissinger

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12592

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      In many populations, not all adults breed every year. The authors analyze models incorporating different forms of nonbreeding, life-history and negative frequency-dependence to quantify effects of nonbreeders on realized and estimated deterministic and stochastic population growth rates, and show that failing to account for nonbreeders can severely bias population dynamic projections.

    2. Cascading effects of defaunation on the coexistence of two specialized insect seed predators

      Guille Peguero, Helene C. Muller-Landau, Patrick A. Jansen and S. Joseph Wright

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12590

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      The unprecedented rates of defaunation, that is the loss of medium and large animals from ecosystems, are among the main features distinguishing the Anthropocene. With the fading of their populations, all their trophic interactions are also vanishing with unanticipated effects on the coexistence of other non-target species.

    3. Intraspecific competition, not predation, drives lizard tail loss on islands

      Yuval Itescu, Rachel Schwarz, Shai Meiri and Panayiotis Pafilis

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12591

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      In this paper, the authors show that in stark opposition to common wisdom, tail autotomy, a well-known antipredator defence mechanism in lizards, is more strongly driven by intraspecific aggression and is negatively associated with predation across insular and mainland populations of Mediterranean geckos.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Let's stay together? Intrinsic and extrinsic factors involved in pair bond dissolution in a recolonizing wolf population

      Cyril Milleret, Petter Wabakken, Olof Liberg, Mikael Åkesson, Øystein Flagstad, Harry Peter Andreassen and Håkan Sand

      Version of Record online: 28 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12587

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      Few estimates of pair bond duration are available for social species, especially for carnivores. The authors found that wolf pair bond duration in Scandinavia was short (half of the dissolution events occurred after three consecutive winters), and dissolutions were mostly caused by humans. This shows the impact of extrinsic factors (i.e. humans) on the social unit of this large carnivore population.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Forbidden fruit: human settlement and abundant fruit create an ecological trap for an apex omnivore

      Clayton T. Lamb, Garth Mowat, Bruce N. McLellan, Scott E. Nielsen and Stan Boutin

      Version of Record online: 28 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12589

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      The authors tested for an ecological trap (ET) in south-east British Columbia where human settlement and rich grizzly bear habitat overlap. Bears occupying the ET faced survival consequences, which produced source–sink dynamics with far-reaching effects. To date, this is the most rigorous test of an ET for a large mammal.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Hunting promotes sexual conflict in brown bears

      Jacinthe Gosselin, Martin Leclerc, Andreas Zedrosser, Sam M. J. G. Steyaert, Jon E. Swenson and Fanie Pelletier

      Version of Record online: 30 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12576

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      The authors explored detailed spatiotemporal effects of male hunting on juvenile survival in brown bears, a species with sexually selected infanticide. The distribution of kills might be more important for juvenile survival than the number of males killed. Thus, reducing harvest intensity might not always increase population growth.

    7. Genetic mixture of multiple source populations accelerates invasive range expansion

      Natalie K. Wagner, Brad M. Ochocki, Kerri M. Crawford, Aldo Compagnoni and Tom E.X. Miller

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12567

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      Genetic mixture of multiple source populations can catapult the spread of biological invasions.

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