Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 85 Issue 1

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Ken Wilson, Ben Sheldon, Jean-Michel Gaillard and Nate Sanders

Impact Factor: 4.504

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 2/154 (Zoology); 21/145 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 1365-2656

Associated Title(s): Functional Ecology, Journal of Applied Ecology, Journal of Ecology, Methods in Ecology and Evolution

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  1. 1 - 31
  1. Standard Papers

    1. Selective extinction drives taxonomic and functional alpha and beta diversities in island bird assemblages

      Xingfeng Si, Andrés Baselga, Fabien Leprieur, Xiao Song and Ping Ding

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12478

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      Si et al. analysed species richness and composition of island bird communities in an inundated lake of China. They found low taxonomic and functional beta diversities that were not correlated to spatial distances due to pervasive dispersal events among islands, and validated selective extinction is the major process driving community assembly of bird assemblages.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Integrated population modelling reveals a perceived source to be a cryptic sink

      Mitch D. Weegman, Stuart Bearhop, Anthony D. Fox, Geoff M. Hilton, Alyn J. Walsh, Jennifer L. McDonald and David J. Hodgson

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12481

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      Using integrated population models which incorporate capture–mark–recapture, census and recruitment data, the authors show that the world's largest wintering subpopulation of Greenland white-fronted geese (assumed to be a source) is a cryptic sink, whose observed stability over 29 years has only been buoyed by annually massive immigration from other wintering units.

    3. Linking structure and function in food webs: maximization of different ecological functions generates distinct food web structures

      Jian D. L. Yen, Reniel B. Cabral, Mauricio Cantor, Ian Hatton, Susanne Kortsch, Joana Patrício and Masato Yamamichi

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12484

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      The authors introduce a method to link the structure and function of food webs and demonstrate that the maximization of different functions predicts distinct food web structures. The approach is general and could be applied to a range of biological systems, including food webs, mutualistic networks, gene-regulatory networks and animal social networks.

    4. Experimental evidence for within- and cross-seasonal effects of fear on survival and reproduction

      Kyle H. Elliott, Gustavo S. Betini, Ian Dworkin and D. Ryan Norris

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12487

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      Sublethal effects of predators are seldom considered in ‘textbook’ ecology because such effects can be difficult to quantify. Nonetheless, in the past two decades, hundreds of studies have shown that fear and associated stress can lead to immediate reduced feeding opportunities and consequently fitness within one season. The authors extend these results to show that, in seasonal environments, the presence of a predator in one season could affect the performance of individuals in both that season and in subsequent seasons (i.e. carry-over effects).

    5. Incorporating animal spatial memory in step selection functions

      Luiz Gustavo R. Oliveira-Santos, James D. Forester, Ubiratan Piovezan, Walfrido M. Tomas and Fernando A. S. Fernandez

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12485

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      The authors developed an approach to understand how short- and long-term memory interact with resource selection to affect the space use of animals. They demonstrate how to incorporate spatial memory into step selection functions and test the relative importance of resource availability and memory to the movement process.

    6. Interannual variation and long-term trends in proportions of resident individuals in partially migratory birds

      Kalle Meller, Anssi V. Vähätalo, Tatu Hokkanen, Jukka Rintala, Markus Piha and Aleksi Lehikoinen

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12486

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      In the first study of the subject regarding multitude of species and different potential explanations, the authors found that early-winter temperature affected the proportion of resident individuals (PoR) in partially migratory waterbirds, whereas tree seed crop was the important factor for terrestrial species. PoR increased in waterbirds during the 25-year study period, but not in terrestrial species.

    7. Onset of autumn shapes the timing of birth in Pyrenean chamois more than onset of spring

      Charlotte Kourkgy, Mathieu Garel, Joël Appolinaire, Anne Loison and Carole Toïgo

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12463

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      The authors findings suggest that plant phenology may act as a cue to induce important stages of the reproductive cycle (e.g. conception, gestation), subsequently affecting parturition dates, and stressed the importance of focusing on long-term changes during spring for which females may show much lower adaptive potential than during autumn (photo: © P. Menaut, ONCFS).

  2. Reviews

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      COMADRE: a global data base of animal demography

      Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Owen R. Jones, C. Ruth Archer, Christoph Bein, Hendrik de Buhr, Claudia Farack, Fränce Gottschalk, Alexander Hartmann, Anne Henning, Gabriel Hoppe, Gesa Römer, Tara Ruoff, Veronika Sommer, Julia Wille, Jakob Voigt, Stefan Zeh, Dirk Vieregg, Yvonne M. Buckley, Judy Che-Castaldo, David Hodgson, Alexander Scheuerlein, Hal Caswell and James W. Vaupel

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12482

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      Population ecologists have developed and published thousands of matrix population models for animals ranging from C. elegans to corals, sheep, lions or even humans, but these data were dispersed in the literature. The authors introduce the COMADRE Animal Matrix Database, an open-data repository with high-resolution demographic information for animals world-wide .

  3. Forum

    1. Do animals exercise to keep fit?

      Lewis G. Halsey

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12488

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      We humans know we are not physically fit unless we do extra, voluntary exercise. Yet we have never asked whether the same is true for animals. If it is, then given that energy will be spent keeping fit this raises important issues about new energetic trade-offs, which have never been considered.

  4. Standard Papers

    1. Climate and habitat interact to shape the thermal reaction norms of breeding phenology across lizard populations

      Alexis Rutschmann, Donald B. Miles, Jean-François Le Galliard, Murielle Richard, Sylvain Moulherat, Barry Sinervo and Jean Clobert

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12473

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      The authors' results provide evidences of interactive effects of anthropogenic disturbance and thermal conditions on parturition date across several of a same viviparous lizard species. The paper also demonstrates how environmental heterogeneity can drive differentiation among reaction norms, which is crucial to estimate the capacity of populations to contend with projected global changes.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Tick exposure and extreme climate events impact survival and threaten the persistence of a long-lived lizard

      Alice R. Jones, C. Michael Bull, Barry W. Brook, Konstans Wells, Kenneth H. Pollock and Damien A. Fordham

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12469

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      The authors assessed the impact of multiple stressors on population dynamics using data from >5800 individuals over a period of 30 years. Using statistical and stochastic demographic models and multiple spatio-temporally varying stressors, the authors show that future climate change will potentially have a significant negative effect on a long-lived reptile species. Photo credit: Dale Burzacott.

    3. Changing climate cues differentially alter zooplankton dormancy dynamics across latitudes

      Natalie T. Jones and Benjamin Gilbert

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12474

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      By considering how climatic cues may shift dynamics across latitudes, the authors were able to provide new insights that suggest changes in dormancy dynamics with spring warming may be an under-appreciated but important consequence of climate change and could lead to zooplankton community shifts that will depend on latitudinal origin.

    4. Do sunbirds use taste to decide how much to drink?

      Ida E. Bailey and Susan W. Nicolson

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12479

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      Nectarivorous birds have high metabolic rates and are expected to use taste to select the most energy rich meals possible. The authors have found that ‘surprisingly’ sunbirds appear not to and instead simply consume more when they are hungrier.

  5. Forum

    1. You have free access to this content
      Continental-scale travelling waves in forest geometrids in Europe: an evaluation of the evidence

      Jane U. Jepsen, Ole Petter L. Vindstad, Frédéric Barraquand, Rolf A. Ims and Nigel G. Yoccoz

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12444

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      A recent paper claims the existence of one of the most large-scale travelling waves ever recorded for any animal population. Here we address why conceptual and methodological pitfalls may have served to exaggerate or even impose the spatial patterns reported. Photo credit: Jane U. Jepsen

    2. You have free access to this content
      A response to Jepsen et al. (2016)

      Olle Tenow

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12476

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      Important findings, e.g. in ecology, should be questioned and debated. Our findings that defoliating looper outbreaks travel as waves across Europe and the response here to such a questioning could be a start of a debate (photo: winter moth carterpillar).

  6. Standard Papers

    1. Energetic constraint of non-monotonic mass change during offspring growth: a general hypothesis and application of a new tool

      Jennifer M. Arnold, Ian C. T. Nisbet and Stephen A. Oswald

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12467

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      Although post-natal mass change is traditionally treated as monotonic (never-decreasing), the authors propose that mass overshooting and recession typify post-natal growth except when energy is limiting. Using a new analytical tool, support is found for this hypothesis in common terns, a species viewed for nearly 50 years as growing monotonically.

    2. Unravelling the role of allochthonous aquatic resources to food web structure in a tropical riparian forest

      Fátima C. Recalde, Thaís C. Postali and Gustavo Q. Romero

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12475

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      This work is the first to be conducted in the tropics, to use stable isotope metrics to better understand the trophic niche dimensions of communities under the influence of allochthonous resources, predator preferences for autochthonous vs. allochthonous resources and flux of C and N in water–land interfaces.

    3. Warming can enhance invasion success through asymmetries in energetic performance

      Marcin R. Penk, Jonathan M. Jeschke, Dan Minchin and Ian Donohue

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12480

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      Climate warming and biological invasions are prominent drivers of global environmental change and it is important to determine how they interact. The authors show that temperature-dependent performance asymmetries between invaders and native analogues are likely to be an important mechanism determining invasion success under warming climate, particularly at higher latitudes and altitudes.

    4. Host infection history modifies co-infection success of multiple parasite genotypes

      Ines Klemme, Katja-Riikka Louhi and Anssi Karvonen

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12472

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      This experimental infection study shows for the first time that infection history of vertebrate hosts affects interactions between co-infecting parasite genotypes.

  7. Forum

    1. You have free access to this content
      Response to Strona & Fattorini: are generalist parasites being lost from their hosts?

      Maxwell J. Farrell, Patrick R. Stephens and T. Jonathan Davies

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12470

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      We respond to criticism of our recent paper by examining assumptions about the structure of host-parasite networks, and discuss the implications of host extinction on our perception of parasite specificity.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Are generalist parasites being lost from their hosts?

      Giovanni Strona and Simone Fattorini

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12443

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      Co-extinctions should be regarded as fundamental co-evolutionary events promoting species turnover, prior than a consequence of human induced biodiversity loss. Focusing on current scenarios is key to biodiversity conservation, but predicting future trends could be harder and less fruitful than trying to get a better grasp on the past.

  8. Standard Papers

    1. A trait-based metric sheds new light on the nature of the body size–depth relationship in the deep sea

      Beth L. Mindel, Thomas J. Webb, Francis C. Neat and Julia L. Blanchard

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12471

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      Deep-sea demersal fish increase in body size with depth, and this relationship is even more pronounced when size is calculated as a fraction of potential maximum size, highlighting the importance of considering intra- and interspecific variation in traits in community ecology.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A benign juvenile environment reduces the strength of antagonistic pleiotropy and genetic variation in the rate of senescence

      Sin-Yeon Kim, Neil B. Metcalfe and Alberto Velando

      Article first published online: 19 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12468

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      The authors pose an interesting question of whether environmental conditions can shape senescence schedules, and test this in an experimental study of a short-lived vertebrate species. They demonstrate genotype-by-environment interactions shaping the rate of senescence. The results suggest that benign conditions weaken the scope for senescence to evolve.

  9. Demography Beyond the Population

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Opportunities and challenges of Integral Projection Models for modelling host–parasite dynamics

      C. Jessica E. Metcalf, Andrea L. Graham, Micaela Martinez-Bakker and Dylan Z. Childs

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12456

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      Epidemiological dynamics are shaped by and may in turn shape host demography. Here, the authors extend statistically derived population models that explicitly account for variance in individual trajectories commonly used for plant and animal demography (Integral Projection Models) to capture the process of infection and propagate it across scales.

    2. How well can body size represent effects of the environment on demographic rates? Disentangling correlated explanatory variables

      Mollie E. Brooks, Marianne Mugabo, Gwendolen M. Rodgers, Timothy G. Benton and Arpat Ozgul

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12465

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      The strength of size as a proxy for past environments varies among vital rates. The authors quantified this using a novel method for understanding nonlinear relationships between responses and multicollinear predictors. This non-mechanistic model has the strength of being flexible enough to apply in data-limited situations and will be useful for identifying patterns and generating hypotheses.

  10. Standard Papers

    1. Phase-dependent climate–predator interactions explain three decades of variation in neonatal caribou survival

      Guillaume Bastille-Rousseau, James A. Schaefer, Keith P. Lewis, Matthew A. Mumma, E. Hance Ellington, Nathaniel D. Rayl, Shane P. Mahoney, Darren Pouliot and Dennis L. Murray

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12466

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      Many studies have examined interactions between intrinsic and extrinsic factors and their effects on animal survival. The authors formalized a new survival mechanism linking nutritional stress, climate, and predation; phase-dependent climate-predator interactions, where maternal body condition influences susceptibility to climate-related events and, subsequently, risk from predation for Newfoundland caribou.

    2. Resource type influences the effects of reserves and connectivity on ecological functions

      Nicholas A. Yabsley, Andrew D. Olds, Rod M. Connolly, Tyson S. H. Martin, Ben L. Gilby, Paul S. Maxwell, Chantal M. Huijbers, David S. Schoeman and Thomas A. Schlacher

      Article first published online: 28 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12460

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      This paper reports a new and exciting result, that connectivity can enhance recovery of ecosystem functions in conservation areas. The findings are of fundamental significance for all ecosystems because they show that the impact of conservation on ecosystem functioning is contingent on the landscape context in which reserves are situated.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Temperature-associated habitat selection in a cold-water marine fish

      Carla Freitas, Esben M. Olsen, Halvor Knutsen, Jon Albretsen and Even Moland

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12458

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      This study found that habitat selection of acoustically tagged cod in Skagerrak was highly dynamic and associated with changes in ocean temperature. The study strongly suggests that cod in this region have to trade off food availability against favourable temperature conditions. Future increases in ocean temperature are expected to further influence the spatial behaviour of marine fish, potentially affecting individual fitness and population dynamics. Photo Credit: Øystein Paulsen.

    4. Top predators and habitat complexity alter an intraguild predation module in pond communities

      Thomas L. Anderson and Raymond D. Semlitsch

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12462

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      The authors' study tests how top predators and habitat complexity simultaneously affect intraguild predation. Top predators strongly affected the intraguild predator, but habitat had minimal effects. However, synergistic effects among top predators, habitat and the survival of intraguild predators affected the intraguild prey that resulted in complex food web dynamics.

    5. Spatial overlap in a solitary carnivore: support for the land tenure, kinship or resource dispersion hypotheses?

      L. Mark Elbroch, Patrick E. Lendrum, Howard Quigley and Anthony Caragiulo

      Article first published online: 16 OCT 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12447

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      Sex and resource distributions explained cougar home range overlap in the Southern Yellowstone Ecosystem. Kinship did not. Results suggest that solitary carnivores may be more tolerant of sharing resources than previously believed and that the resource dispersion hypothesis (typically applied to social species) is also applicable to solitary carnivores.

    6. Experimental manipulation of floral scent bouquets restructures flower–visitor interactions in the field

      Anne-Amélie C. Larue, Robert A. Raguso and Robert R. Junker

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12441

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      Recently, network research moved from descriptive to mechanistic studies asking questions about the functional foundation of species interactions and community composition. This study is the first that directly characterizes the effect of an individual trait (floral scent bouquets) on the quantitative and qualitative distribution of plant-animal interactions allowing conclusions about their co-evolution and the maintenance of biodiversity.

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