Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 84 Issue 5

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Ken Wilson, Ben Sheldon, Jean-Michel Gaillard and Nate Sanders

Impact Factor: 4.504

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 2/153 (Zoology); 21/144 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 1365-2656

Associated Title(s): Functional Ecology, Journal of Applied Ecology, Journal of Ecology, Methods in Ecology and Evolution

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  1. Standard Papers

    1. A bust but no boom: responses of floodplain bird assemblages during and after prolonged drought

      Katherine E. Selwood, Rohan H. Clarke, Shaun C. Cunningham, Hania Lada, Melodie A. McGeoch and Ralph Mac Nally

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12424

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      Climate extremes such as severe drought will become more prevalent in future. Severe droughts had pervasive effects on floodplain birds, with most showing low resistance. Few species, irrespective of their biological attributes, showed much resilience to the relaxation of the drought, which suggests a potential ratcheting decline in the avifauna.

    2. Predictive modelling of habitat selection by marine predators with respect to the abundance and depth distribution of pelagic prey

      Charlotte Boyd, Ramiro Castillo, George L. Hunt Jr, André E. Punt, Glenn R. VanBlaricom, Henri Weimerskirch and Sophie Bertrand

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12409

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      This paper addresses the question of how foraging site selection by seabirds relates to the abundance and depth distribution of their prey. This is an important question in the context of growing concerns about the effects of fisheries and climate change on prey availability to seabirds and other marine predators.

    3. Raccoon contact networks predict seasonal susceptibility to rabies outbreaks and limitations of vaccination

      Jennifer J. H. Reynolds, Ben T. Hirsch, Stanley D. Gehrt and Meggan E. Craft

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12422

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      The authors develop a dynamic network model using empirically-derived contact data to simulate rabies spread through a raccoon population. The findings provide new insights into rabies dynamics and have important implications for disease control.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Contrasting responses of male and female foraging effort to year-round wind conditions

      Sue Lewis, Richard A. Phillips, Sarah J. Burthe, Sarah Wanless and Francis Daunt

      Article first published online: 18 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12419

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      There is a concern that increasing wind speeds are affecting the foraging ability of animals. The authors show that the foraging effort of female European shags was greater than males as wind conditions worsened. The findings have important consequences on the survival prospects of the two sexes as the climate changes. Photo credit: Richard Bardgett.

    5. Adaptive strategies in nocturnally migrating insects and songbirds: contrasting responses to wind

      Jason W. Chapman, Cecilia Nilsson, Ka S. Lim, Johan Bäckman, Don R. Reynolds and Thomas Alerstam

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12420

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      Migratory songbirds and moths must cope with challenging wind conditions during their long journeys. This paper is the first quantitative comparison of the flight strategies these two groups of migrants employ in relation to winds, and sheds light on the ecology and evolution of their migration strategies.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Testing predator–prey theory using broad-scale manipulations and independent validation

      Robert Serrouya, Bruce N. McLellan and Stan Boutin

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12413

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      If predators display a Type II functional response combined with a numerical response that is also asymptotic (e.g. regulated by social factors), predation rates can increase as prey populations decline. This effect can be destabilizing and cause yields to be overestimated. The authors observed this depensatory pattern in an experimental moose-wolf system.

    7. Habitat features and long-distance dispersal modify the use of social information by a long-distance migratory bird

      Clark S. Rushing, Michele R. Dudash and Peter P. Marra

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12395

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      Linking social information to dispersal behavior is important for understanding how individuals select breeding sites. Experimental playbacks and stable isotopes suggested that dispersers use different cues to select breeding sites than non-dispersers. Both groups modified social information use based on habitat features, which may help individuals avoid low-quality habitat.

    8. Colour polymorphism torn apart by opposing positive frequency-dependent selection, yet maintained in space

      Swanne P. Gordon, Hanna Kokko, Bibiana Rojas, Ossi Nokelainen and Johanna Mappes

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12416

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      The authors demonstrate that reproduction success is unexpectedly positively frequently-dependent in the aposematic wood tiger moth. The model shows that colour polymorphisms can be maintained under positive frequency-dependent selection, provided slight migration between subpopulations. Essentially, both differential mating success and spatial variation in predation drive a selection mosaic preventing monomorphism.

    9. Time-scale dependency of host plant biomass- and trait-mediated indirect effects of deer herbivory on a swallowtail butterfly

      Shun Takagi and Tadashi Miyashita

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12415

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      The authors propose a novel approach to estimate the time-scales during which density- and trait-mediated effects manifest. The analysis quantified the time-scale dependency of density- and trait-mediated indirect interactions and provides the empirical evidence that the net indirect effect changed from positive to negative with time.

    10. Spatial and spatiotemporal variation in metapopulation structure affects population dynamics in a passively dispersing arthropod

      Annelies De Roissart, Shaopeng Wang and Dries Bonte

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12400

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      This is the first paper demonstrating contrasting effects of metapopulation structure on local and metapopulation-level demography.

  2. Special Feature: Stuck In Motion? Reconnecting Questions And Tools In Movement Ecology

    1. Predicting the continuum between corridors and barriers to animal movements using Step Selection Functions and Randomized Shortest Paths

      Manuela Panzacchi, Bram Van Moorter, Olav Strand, Marco Saerens, Ilkka Kivimäki, Colleen C. St. Clair, Ivar Herfindal and Luigi Boitani

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12386

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      Movement corridors and barriers are two sides of the same coin. The authors model the multi-scale cognitive maps by which animals likely navigate real landscapes, and identify corridor-barrier continua for animals adopting sub-optimal, but non-random, movement strategies. The approach generalizes the most common algorithms for identifying corridors, and allows predicting corridor-barrier continua with increased realism.

  3. Standard Papers

    1. The developmental race between maturing host plants and their butterfly herbivore – the influence of phenological matching and temperature

      Diana Posledovich, Tenna Toftegaard, Christer Wiklund, Johan Ehrlén and Karl Gotthard

      Article first published online: 4 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12417

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      The study demonstrated that the influence of phenological matching and thermal conditions on the developmental race between an insect herbivore and its host plants is highly plant species specific. Therefore, climate warming is likely to change temporal match between larval and plant development in some plant species, while be buffered in the others. Photograph credit: Vlad Dinca.

    2. Who escapes detection? Quantifying the causes and consequences of sampling biases in a long-term field study

      Lindall R. Kidd, Ben C. Sheldon, Emily G. Simmonds and Ella F. Cole

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12411

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      For the first time in a long-term population study, the authors identify individuals that fail early in their breeding attempt. This paper shows that these individuals represent a biased sample of the population. Further, the paper reveals that estimates of reproductive success and selection in the population are biased – which is of broad interest to ecologists working on all wild vertebrate populations.

  4. Special Feature: Stuck In Motion? Reconnecting Questions And Tools In Movement Ecology

    1. Movement is the glue connecting home ranges and habitat selection

      Bram Van Moorter, Christer M. Rolandsen, Mathieu Basille and Jean-Michel Gaillard

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12394

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      The two core properties of movement are patch departure and patch choice. These two movement processes connect an animal's home range and habitat selection patterns as two sides of a coin. A large set of moose GPS-tracking data supported well most of our predictions.

  5. Standard Papers

    1. Habitat-mediated carry-over effects lead to context-dependent outcomes of species interactions

      Benjamin G. Van Allen and Volker H. W. Rudolf

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12408

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      Carry-over effects occur when the natal environment alters individual traits, and they then move to a new environment. The authors work demonstrates that carry-over effects can create context dependent variability in the outcome of species interactions within habitat types. This variation in competitive outcomes within habitats has implications for spatial coexistence.

    2. Synergistic effects of fire and elephants on arboreal animals in an African savanna

      Robert M. Pringle, Duncan M. Kimuyu, Ryan L. Sensenig, Todd M. Palmer, Corinna Riginos, Kari E. Veblen and Truman P. Young

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12404

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      Few prior experiments have independently manipulated both fire and elephants to measure their effects on wildlife populations. The authors show that for 1 year following controlled burns, fire and elephants acted jointly to increase the abundance of tree-dwelling geckos. Subsequently, the positive effect of elephants subsided, while that of fire remained.

  6. Special Feature: Stuck In Motion? Reconnecting Questions And Tools In Movement Ecology

    1. What is the animal doing? Tools for exploring behavioural structure in animal movements

      Eliezer Gurarie, Chloe Bracis, Maria Delgado, Trevor D. Meckley, Ilpo Kojola and C. Michael Wagner

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12379

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      Identifying unique behaviours from animal movement data is a fundamental challenge. To help practitioners navigate a bewildering array of available tools, the authors review a range of approaches and apply them to data sets, identifying unique strengths and potential pitfalls. The authors conclude with basic principles for exploratory analysis of behavioural changes.

  7. Standard Papers

    1. Animal personality in a foundation species drives community divergence and collapse in the wild

      Jonathan N. Pruitt and Andreas P. Modlmeier

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12406

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      The paper experimentally demonstrates that the personality type of the founding members of a community change the rate and path of succession and community longevity over seven generations in the field.

    2. Implications of scaled δ15N fractionation for community predator–prey body mass ratio estimates in size-structured food webs

      Jonathan C. P. Reum, Simon Jennings and Mary E. Hunsicker

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12405

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      The authors show for the first time that adoption of scaled δ15N trophic fractionation methods markedly reduce previously reported differences in trophic level at body mass and also substantially improved similarity in predator-prey body mass ratios among fish communities from different regions. Results imply that realized prey size in size-structured fish communities may be less variable than previously assumed and food chains potentially longer.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Live fast, die old: no evidence of reproductive senescence or costs of mating in a damselfly (Odonata: Zygoptera)

      Christopher Hassall, Thomas N. Sherratt, Phillip C. Watts and David J. Thompson

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12407

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      In a previous study the authors demonstrated that older damselflies show signs of ageing despite their short lifespans, but in this comprehensive study the authors show that there appears to be neither a decline in reproductive performance nor a ‘cost of sex’ in terms of increased risk of mortality in breeding individuals.

    4. Ecosystem-level effects of a globally spreading invertebrate invader are not moderated by a functionally similar native

      Marcin Penk, Kenneth Irvine and Ian Donohue

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12402

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      The authors show that introduced species can, irrespective of competition with functionally similar natives, induce complex and indirect whole-ecosystem changes that reach far beyond direct consumptive effects. They also show that the cascading indirect effects of invasion can exacerbate the impacts of other stressors in ecosystems.

    5. The sign of cascading predator effects varies with prey traits in a detrital system

      Xinwei Wu, John N. Griffin, Xinqiang Xi and Shucun Sun

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12403

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      The authors show that prey locomotion traits can determine the sign of cascading species interactions in a detrital system for the first time. This may stimulate both further tests of the presented hypothesis in other detrital systems and research into the importance of prey movement traits for trophic cascades more generally.

    6. Diet complexity in early life affects survival in released pheasants by altering foraging efficiency, food choice, handling skills and gut morphology

      Mark A. Whiteside, Rufus Sage and Joah R. Madden

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12401

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      A more natural diet early in life enhances survival of released pheasants. A more complex diet improves prey handling skills, increases foraging efficiency, reduces reliance on human-supplied food and alters gut structure. Simple changes to early life conditions promote a broad suite of adaptations in adults.

  8. Special Feature Review: Stuck In Motion? Reconnecting Questions And Tools In Movement Ecology

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Can habitat selection predict abundance?

      Mark S. Boyce, Chris J. Johnson, Evelyn H. Merrill, Scott E. Nielsen, Erling J. Solberg and Bram van Moorter

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12359

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      Habitat is fundamental to the distribution and abundance of animals. The authors show how habitat selection models can be linked to population size thereby creating a direct link between habitats and population ecology.

  9. Special Feature: Stuck In Motion? Reconnecting Questions And Tools In Movement Ecology

    1. ‘You shall not pass!’: quantifying barrier permeability and proximity avoidance by animals

      Hawthorne L. Beyer, Eliezer Gurarie, Luca Börger, Manuela Panzacchi, Mathieu Basille, Ivar Herfindal, Bram Van Moorter, Subhash R. Lele and Jason Matthiopoulos

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12275

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      Here, the authors develop a framework for simultaneously quantifying the effects of habitat preference, barrier permeability and intrinsic movement ability on space use, based on a time series of telemetry locations. This approach provides insight into the effects of barriers on animal distribution and movement.

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