Journal of Animal Ecology

Cover image for Vol. 83 Issue 5

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Ken Wilson, Tim Coulson, Jean-Michel Gaillard and Ben Sheldon

Impact Factor: 4.726

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 1/152 (Zoology); 21/140 (Ecology)

Online ISSN: 1365-2656

Associated Title(s): Functional Ecology, Journal of Applied Ecology, Journal of Ecology, Methods in Ecology and Evolution

  1. Standard Papers

    1. Allometric scaling of indirect effects: body size ratios predict non-consumptive effects in multi-predator systems

      Lauren Krenek and Volker H. W. Rudolf

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12254

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      Results indicate that models which assume that predators have independent effects on their prey are particularly likely to make erroneous predictions when predators differ substantially in size, but simple allometric relationships of NCEs could be used to correct this bias.

    2. Unravelling the annual cycle in a migratory animal: breeding-season habitat loss drives population declines of monarch butterflies

      D. T. Tyler Flockhart, Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt, D. Ryan Norris and Tara G. Martin

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12253

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      Threats to migratory animals occur at multiple periods of the annual cycle that are separated by thousands of kilometers and span international borders. Using a year-round population model, we show that population declines of monarch butterflies result from loss of breeding habitats in the United States, not from loss of wintering habitats in Mexico.

    3. Ecological divergence among colour morphs mediated by changes in spatial network structure associated with disturbance

      Matthew S. Lattanzio and Donald B. Miles

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12252

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      Our study provides unique insight into how environmental variation resulting from disturbance may interact with variation in individual behaviour to influence the spatial structuring of animal populations. We highlight some of the key social and ecological ramifications of this interaction for populations in resource-limited habitats.

  2. Forum

    1. Why is eusociality an almost exclusively terrestrial phenomenon?

      Graeme D. Ruxton, Stuart Humphries, Lesley J. Morrell and David M. Wilkinson

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12251

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      In this thought-provoking forum paper, the authors discuss the strange observation that while social insects such as ants, termites, bees and wasps play large roles in terrestrial ecosystems, truly social taxa are far less common in aquatic environments.

  3. Standard Papers

    1. Multi-taxa trait and functional responses to physical disturbance

      Scott M. Pedley and Paul M. Dolman

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12249

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      This is the first study to contrast trait responses from two diverse terrestrial arthropod groups to those of vascular plants, along a single environmental gradient. The authors show that generalizations of trait response across taxa should be cautious as responses vary among taxa.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Growth trajectory influences temperature preference in fish through an effect on metabolic rate

      Shaun S. Killen

      Article first published online: 17 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12244

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      This study demonstrates for the first time that dietary history and growth trajectory influence preferred temperatures of fish, with the underlying cause being the effect of compensatory growth on individual metabolic rate. As a consequence, even in regularly growing fish, increased resting metabolic demand causes a preference for cooler environments

    3. The number of competitor species is unlinked to sexual dimorphism

      Shai Meiri, Amy E. Kadison, Maria Novosolov, Panayiotis Pafilis, Johannes Foufopoulos, Yuval Itescu, Pasquale Raia and Daniel Pincheira-Donoso

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12248

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      Sexual size dimorphism within three lizard species does not change with the number of putative competitors they face on different-sized islands in the Aegean Sea. We found, counter to expected ecological theory, sexual dimorphism does not diminish as guilds acquire more species.

    4. Prevalence and beta diversity in avian malaria communities: host species is a better predictor than geography

      Elizabeth S. C. Scordato and Melissa R. Kardish

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12246

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      This paper uses measures of phylogenetic and community beta diversity to show that host species is a better predictor of malaria community turnover than site, providing no evidence for a distance–decay relationship in these parasite communities.

    5. Variation in abundance of nectarivorous birds: does a competitive despot interfere with flower tracking?

      Joanne M. Bennett, Rohan H. Clarke, James R. Thomson and Ralph Mac Nally

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12245

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      Nectarivores track spatial and temporal variation in flowering but altered patterns of interspecific competition, driven by fragmentation and climate-induced vegetation degradation, deflect the distribution of small-bodied nectarivorous birds from an ‘ideal free distribution’ to an ‘ideal despotic distribution’.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Parasites and genetic diversity in an invasive bumblebee

      Catherine M. Jones and Mark J. F. Brown

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12235

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      Using an ecologically and economically important genus of pollinators as a model system, the authors ask how enemy release, at the level of parasite communities and real parasite impact, and functional genetic diversity, contribute to the invasion success of a non-native bumblebee in the United Kingdom.

    7. Effects of spatial structure of population size on the population dynamics of barnacles across their elevational range

      Keiichi Fukaya, Takehiro Okuda, Masahiro Nakaoka and Takashi Noda

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12234

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      This study explores the variability–range relationship of population size by analysing long-term data of intertidal barnacles collected over their vertical range. Results show a tendency that populations are variable at range margins due to increased stochastic fluctuation in growth rate, as well as an association between population size and its variability.

    8. Year-round effects of climate on demographic parameters of an arctic-nesting goose species

      Louise van Oudenhove, Gilles Gauthier and Jean-Dominique Lebreton

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12230

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      Understanding how climate changes affect animal populations remains a major challenge, especially in arctic-nesting migratory birds exposed to different climatic regimes. With a 23-year data set, this study highlights how temperatures encountered throughout the annual cycle affect the vital rates of the greater snow geese.

    9. Mate finding, Allee effects and selection for sex-biased dispersal

      Allison K. Shaw and Hanna Kokko

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12232

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      This article resolves contradicting predictions from the mate search and dispersal literatures about correlation between male and female dispersal and demonstrates that sex bias in dispersal depends on when mating occurs during the dispersal process.

    10. Exotic birds increase generalization and compensate for native bird decline in plant–frugivore assemblages

      Daniel García, Daniel Martínez, Daniel B. Stouffer and Jason M. Tylianakis

      Article first published online: 2 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12237

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      This study shows that the stronger the integration of exotic birds in the frugivore assemblages of New Zealand, the higher the degree of generalization of plant–frugivore networks. By diversifying the frugivore guild for native plants, exotic birds may increase the resilience of seed dispersal against native bird extinction (Artwork by Daniel Martinez).

    11. Does variation in the intensity and duration of predation drive evolutionary changes in senescence?

      Matthew R. Walsh, Deirdre Whittington and Melissa J. Walsh

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12247

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      This is a rare test of the evolutionary theory of senescence, evaluating the importance of predation on ageing and showing that increased mortality does not select for faster ageing. Such results challenge our current understanding of the importance of predation on senescence.

    12. Special structures of hoopoe eggshells enhance the adhesion of symbiont-carrying uropygial secretion that increase hatching success

      Manuel Martín-Vivaldi, Juan J. Soler, Juan M. Peralta-Sánchez, Laura Arco, Antonio M. Martín-Platero, Manuel Martínez-Bueno, Magdalena Ruiz-Rodríguez and Eva Valdivia

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12243

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      This study provides strong evidence of a mutualistic association between hoopoes and antibiotic producing bacteria, whereby the bacteria protect embryos against infection.

    13. Temperature-dependent variation in alternative migratory tactics and its implications for fitness and population dynamics in a salmonid fish

      Kentaro Morita, Tsuyoshi Tamate, Mari Kuroki and Toru Nagasawa

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12240

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      This study showed that the proportion of male masu salmon exhibiting migratory behavior decreased with increasing temperature. Additionally, the occurrence of delayed age at migration decreased with increasing temperature. These responses to increased temperature are explained by an adaptation to maximize fitness.

    14. Forest structure drives global diversity of primates

      Sidney F. Gouveia, Fabricio Villalobos, Ricardo Dobrovolski, Raone Beltrão-Mendes and Stephen F. Ferrari

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12241

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      This study provides a novel account on the likely causes of the global pattern of primate species richness, namely the vertical forest structure, thus challenging previous hypothesis based on levels of rainfall or productivity.

    15. Density-dependent intraspecific aggression regulates survival in northern Yellowstone wolves (Canis lupus)

      Sarah Cubaynes, Daniel R. MacNulty, Daniel R. Stahler, Kira A. Quimby, Douglas W. Smith and Tim Coulson

      Article first published online: 21 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12238

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      This article provides empirical support for the hypothesis that intrinsic density-dependent mechanisms might regulate territorial carnivore populations at high ungulate densities.

    16. Disentangling the effects of exposure and susceptibility on transmission of the zoonotic parasite Schistosoma mansoni

      David J. Civitello and Jason R. Rohr

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12222

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      Here, the authors develop mechanistic disease transmission models to separate exposure and susceptibility and enhance predictions of the spread of a human zoonotic disease in its wildlife hosts. This approach could improve predictions of human risk and be applied to many host–parasite disease systems.

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