Journal of Clinical Nursing

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 19-20

Edited By: Editor-in-Chief: Debra Jackson Editors: Sue Barnason, Carol Haigh, Leslie Gelling and Graeme D Smith

Impact Factor: 1.233

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 28/104 (Nursing (Social Science)); 32/106 (Nursing (Science))

Online ISSN: 1365-2702

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Call for reviewers

JCN is currently seeking new reviewers to join our team. Reviewers are charged with providing analysis to the JCN editors regarding the quality of submissions, considering their merit and contribution to the field.

For further information and to apply


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Read the latest Virtual Issue: on Work environment edited by Graeme D. Smith

Managing Care Transitions
Managing patients’ transitions of care continues to be a challenging and evolving healthcare issue. Poorly orchestrated care transitions (e.g. transition from hospital to home) can result in increased mortality and rehospitalization. Read the articles for free here.

New Editors

We are delighted to announce that we have appointed two new Editors for JCN, Professor Sue Barnason, Professor of Nursing at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, USA, and Dr Leslie Gelling, Reader in Nursing at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.

Editor's Choice - July

Editor's Choice

The responses of healthcare professionals to the admission of people with cognitive impairment to acute hospital settings: an observational and interview study
Philip Clissett, Davina Porock, Rowan H Harwood and John RF Gladman

Compassion in nursing is under particular focus in the United Kingdom following a series of high profile failures of care in recent years, however it is an issue that it relevant to nursing on an international scale. The increasing longevity of the global population means that nurses are encountering patients with cognitive impairment in all situations.

This paper is thought provoking in its focus. The reported perception of cognitively impaired patient as ‘disruptive’ is one that is highlighted in literature, however the notion that nursing them is somehow less rewarding because such patients are often not in a position to appreciate or acknowledge the care provided to them is one that is less often discussed. Clissett et al. note that nurses address this sense of disruption by endeavouring to maintain control of the situation, sometimes with great sensitivity and sometime less so. Some of the observations reported by the authors are distressing and disturbing.

This paper is thought provoking and should be read by every nurse (which is probably all of us) who will be caring for the cognitively impaired individual – it will make you reflect upon your own practice and those of colleagues, which is what good clinical research should do.

Professor Carol Haigh


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Here are some reasons to submit your paper to JCN:

High-impact forum: one of the world’s most cited nursing journals, with an impact factor of 1.316 – ranked 21/101 (Nursing (Social Science)) and 25/103 Nursing (Science) in the 2012 Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters, 2012)

One of the most read nursing journals in the world: over 2 million full text accesses in 2012 and accessible in over 8000 libraries worldwide (including over 3500 in developing countries with free or low cost access).

Early View: fully citable online publication ahead of inclusion in an issue

Fast and easy online submission: online submission at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jcnur

Positive publishing experience: rapid double-blind peer review with constructive feedback.

Online Open: the option to make your article freely and openly accessible to non-subscribers upon publication in Wiley Online Library, as well as the option to deposit the article in your preferred archive. For full author guidelines click here

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