Journal of Ecology

Cover image for Journal of Ecology

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: David Gibson, Richard Bardgett, Mark Rees, Amy Austin

Impact Factor: 5.694

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 12/141 (Ecology); 12/199 (Plant Sciences)

Online ISSN: 1365-2745

Associated Title(s): Functional Ecology, Journal of Animal Ecology, Journal of Applied Ecology, Methods in Ecology and Evolution

VIEW

  1. 1 - 18
  1. Forum

    1. Biomass–density data analysis: a comment on Cabaço et al. (2013)

      Vasco M. N. C. S. Vieira, Francisco Leitão and Marcos Mateus

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12294

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Some mistakes present in Cabaço et al. are of a generalistic nature, that is can occur in any other subject as they report to general xy data analysis. Besides, other mistakes were identified, specific to biomass–density relations. This presentation intends to help ecological researchers by pinpointing the sources of bias.

  2. Standard Papers

    1. The relative importance of biotic and abiotic processes for structuring plant communities through time

      Elizabeth S. Jeffers, Michael B. Bonsall, Cynthia A. Froyd, Stephen J. Brooks and Katherine J. Willis

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12365

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multiple mechanistic models were applied to palaeoecological data to infer the most likely processes driving millennial-scale plant biomass dynamics in a woodland ecosystem, and how the importance of each driver changed over time. Here, importance is measured in terms of the goodness of fit of each population dynamic model for predicting the observed biomass dynamics for each of the study taxa. This is measured as the root mean square error (RMSE) between the predicted and observed pollen accumulation rates, which was calculated over a moving window of ca. 500 years. The lowest RMSE value indicates the best fitting model(s). Direct plant interactions provided a better explanation for population biomass dynamics than growing season temperature or N availability over the full study period. The relative importance of all drivers we assessed here varied by species and – in the case of birch – over time in response to warming and reduced N availability.

    2. Early human impact (5000–3000 BC) affects mountain forest dynamics in the Alps

      Christoph Schwörer, Daniele Colombaroli, Petra Kaltenrieder, Fabian Rey and Willy Tinner

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12354

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Palaeoecological evidence from the Northern Swiss Alps indicates that people used fire to expand pastures at the timberline since the Neolithic (5000 BC). Human impact caused a decline in Abies alba and facilitated the expansion of Picea abies, which dominates today's subalpine forests. Fire and traditional pastoralism have the potential to mitigate the effects of climate change, maintain species-rich high-alpine meadows and prevent biodiversity losses.

    3. Overyielding in mixed forests decreases with site productivity

      Maude Toïgo, Patrick Vallet, Thomas Perot, Jean-Daniel Bontemps, Christian Piedallu and Benoit Courbaud

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12353

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The nature of species interaction in mixtures changes with species assemblage and site productivity (SPI). Overyielding is strongest when species grow in highlands (Beech-Spruce, Beech-Fir and Fir-Spruce mixtures) on less productive sites. A negative link between mixture effect and site productivity was found, in line with the stress-gradient hypothesis.

    4. Root functional parameters along a land-use gradient: evidence of a community-level economics spectrum

      Iván Prieto, Catherine Roumet, Remi Cardinael, Christian Dupraz, Christophe Jourdan, John H. Kim, Jean Luc Maeght, Zhun Mao, Alain Pierret, Noelia Portillo, Olivier Roupsard, Chantanousone Thammahacksa and Alexia Stokes

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12351

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using root traits from communities in contrasting climates and land-use types, we demonstrate the existence of a community-root economics spectrum, that is a trade-off in root construction favouring either resource acquisition or conservation operating within different root types (fine, coarse). This suggests that all plant tissues are controlled by similar trade-offs.

    5. Vegetation patterns in small boreal streams relate to ice and winter floods

      Lovisa Lind and Christer Nilsson

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12355

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We evaluated the effects of ice regimes and winter flooding on riparian and in-stream vegetation by relating the cover, composition and biomass of vegetation to the abundance of winter floods caused by anchor ice. We found that ice disturbance and winter floods caused by anchor ice are important disturbance agents that allow less competitive species to establish along small boreal streams.

    6. Microhabitat associations of vascular epiphytes in a wet tropical forest canopy

      Carrie L. Woods, Catherine L. Cardelús and Saara J. DeWalt

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12357

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The increase in microhabitat heterogeneity within tree crowns as trees grow contributes to changes in epiphyte community structure, which supports decades-old hypotheses of the importance of microhabitat diversity and specialization in structuring tropical epiphyte communities.

    7. Smooth brome invasion increases rare soil bacterial species prevalence, bacterial species richness and evenness

      Candace L. Piper, Steven D. Siciliano, Tristrom Winsley and Eric G. Lamb

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12356

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Here, we show that plant community composition influences bacterial community structure at a very fine scale, but that these changes are not due to altered soil total nitrogen or carbon content. The dominant direct effect of smooth brome invasion on soil communities suggests non-edaphic, that is inter- and intratrophic, interactions among smooth brome and non-bacterial components of the soil ecosystem are key drivers of soil community structure.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Bryophyte communities in the Amazon forest are regulated by height on the host tree and site elevation

      Sylvia Mota de Oliveira and Hans ter Steege

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12359

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study indicated that the community composition of epiphytic bryophytes in the Amazon is mainly regulated by environmental conditions, that is, height zone on the host tree at local scale and site elevation at geographical scale. Dispersal is predominantly local and did not show geographical structure across the area.

    9. Erosion of beta diversity under interacting global change impacts in a semi-arid grassland

      Anu Eskelinen and Susan Harrison

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12360

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Our findings are a novel demonstration of how interacting global change factors reduce beta diversity by eroding the biotic and abiotic resistances that control community structure along soil fertility gradients.

    10. Relative density and dispersion pattern of two southern African Asteraceae affect fecundity through heterospecific interference and mate availability, not pollinator visitation rate

      Caroli de Waal, Bruce Anderson and Allan G. Ellis

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12358

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Relative density and dispersion pattern of two southern African Asteraceae affect fecundity through heterospecific interference and mate availability, not pollinator visitation rate. In this study of annual daisies, variation in fruit set is primarily driven by factors that affect the transfer of conspecific relative to heterospecific pollen, independent of pollinator visitation rate. Our findings demonstrate that mate limitation and interspecific pollen transfer negatively affect fruit set and that these effects can be mitigated by intraspecific aggregation and the ability to autonomously self-pollinate.

    11. Temperature-induced recruitment pulses of Arctic dwarf shrub communities

      Ulf Büntgen, Lena Hellmann, Willy Tegel, Signe Normand, Isla Myers-Smith, Alexander V. Kirdyanov, Daniel Nievergelt and Fritz H. Schweingruber

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12361

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Our results reveal a strong temperature dependency of Arctic dwarf shrub reproduction, a high vulnerability of circumpolar tundra ecosystems to climatic changes, and the ability of evaluating historical vegetation dynamics well beyond the northern treeline. The combined wood anatomical and plant ecological approach, considering insights from microsections to community assemblages, indicates that model predictions of rapid tundra expansion (i.e. shrub growth) following intense warming might underestimate plant longevity and persistence but overestimate the sensitivity and reaction time of Arctic vegetation.

    12. Soil fertility induces coordinated responses of multiple independent functional traits

      Melissa M. Jager, Sarah J. Richardson, Peter J. Bellingham, Michael J. Clearwater and Daniel C. Laughlin

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12366

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Species sorting can occur over short distances in ecosystems where topographically driven variation in soil fertility leads to complete compositional turnover. Inferences about species distributions based on single-trait spectrums can be misleading when environmental gradients sort species by filtering multiple independent traits simultaneously. Identifying the multidimensional trait combinations that promote fitness will advance both theory development and ecological restoration.

    13. Indirect effects of global change accumulate to alter plant diversity but not ecosystem function in alpine tundra

      Emily C. Farrer, Isabel W. Ashton, Marko J. Spasojevic, Shiyang Fu, David J. X. Gonzalez and Katharine N. Suding

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12363

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Increasing indirect effects on diversity over time indicate that short-term experiments or monitoring of natural systems may underestimate the full magnitude of global change effects on plant communities. Explicitly accounting for changes in dominant plant abundance may be necessary for forecasting plant community response to environmental change. Conversely, weak indirect effects for ecosystem processes suggest that predicting ecosystem function without knowledge of plant responses to global change may be possible.

    14. Simultaneous pulsed flowering in a temperate legume: causes and consequences of multimodality in the shape of floral display schedules

      Susana M. Wadgymar, Emily J. Austen, Matthew N. Cumming and Arthur E. Weis

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12362

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Researchers should take caution in assuming that components of display schedules are genetically or developmentally correlated with flowering onset. Variation in the shape of display schedules can influence patterns of gene flow within or between populations, with potential effects on the strength of phenological assortative mating and subsequent responses to selection.

    15. Woody cover in wet and dry African savannas after six decades of experimental fires

      Aisling P. Devine, Iain Stott, Robbie A. McDonald and Ilya M. D. Maclean

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12367

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We examined the effects of varying fire frequencies over a 60-year time period upon woody vegetation on a wet and dry savanna. We suggest that vegetation responses to fire are influenced by regional differences in rainfall. Therefore, management strategies should take account of whether a savanna is a wet or dry system when implementing fire management regimes.

    16. A conifer–angiosperm divergence in the growth vs. shade tolerance trade-off underlies the dynamics of a New Zealand warm-temperate rain forest

      Christopher H. Lusk, Murray A. Jorgensen and Peter J. Bellingham

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12368

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Conifers rarely regenerate by a gap-phase mode in warm-temperate rainforests in New Zealand, tending to be replaced by evergreen angiosperms in old stands. We show this happens because the conifers are slower-growing than angiosperms of comparable shade tolerance. A conifer–angiosperm divergence in the growth vs. shade tolerance trade-off may thus explain long-standing problems of the dynamics of these forests.

    17. Lichen traits responding to aridity

      Paula Matos, Pedro Pinho, Gregorio Aragón, Isabel Martínez, Alice Nunes, Amadeu M. V. M. Soares and Cristina Branquinho

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12364

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lichen traits responding to aridity were identified. Type of photobiont was particularly responsive, with Trentepohlia and cyanobacteria functional groups, responding clearly in contrasting ways to aridity. This work emphasizes functional diversity role on understanding and assessing the response to environmental factors, namely to climate. It also highlights the potential use of lichen functional groups as ecological indicators of climate change.

VIEW

  1. 1 - 18

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION