Physiological Entomology

Cover image for Vol. 39 Issue 4

Edited By: Robert Weaver, Henry Fadamiro and Shin G. Goto

Impact Factor: 1.434

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 29/90 (Entomology)

Online ISSN: 1365-3032

Associated Title(s): Agricultural and Forest Entomology, Ecological Entomology, Insect Conservation and Diversity, Insect Molecular Biology, Medical and Veterinary Entomology, Systematic Entomology

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Physiology and Behaviour
The editors of Physiological Entomology are proud to present a new virtual issue which is timed to coincide with the XXIV International Congress of Entomology in Daegu, Korea in August 2012. In this virtual issue we highlight the strength and diversity of selected papers we have published that emanated from a first author located in Asia. Read more

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Best Paper Award

NEW! PHYSIOLOGICAL ENTOMOLOGY BEST PAPER AWARD FOR 2011

The 2011 prize for the best paper published in Physiological Entomology in 2009 has been awarded to:

Diet affects female mating behaviour in a seed-feeding beetle
CHARLES W. FOX, JORDI MOYA-LARAÑO
Physiological Entomology (2009), 34, 370-378

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News

Prof. John Hildebrand

The 2016 Wigglesworth Lecture and Award has been awarded to Professor John Hildebrand for his lecture entitled "How Insects Smell, and Why We Should Care". The Award is made in recognition of the great contribution of Sir Vincent Wigglesworth to Insect Biology and the example that he set in the performance of his work.
John’s research combines neurophysiological, behavioral, chemical-ecological, anatomical, molecular and developmental approaches in a multidisciplinary program addressing problems of the information-processing mechanisms, behavioral roles, functional organization, and postembryonic development of the olfactory system in insects. His program’s goal long has been to understand the olfactory bases of beneficial and harmful behaviors of insects that impact human health and welfare.

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