Terra Nova

Cover image for Vol. 27 Issue 4

Edited By: Jean Braun, Georges Calas, Max Coleman, Carlo Doglioni, Klaus Mezger & Jason Phipps Morgan

Impact Factor: 2.639

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 40/175 (Geosciences Multidisciplinary)

Online ISSN: 1365-3121

Just Published Articles

  1. Geomorphologic evidence for Plio-Quaternary shortening in the southern Neuquén basin (40°S, Argentina)

    Damien Huyghe, Bertrand Nivière and Cédric Bonnel

    Accepted manuscript online: 27 AUG 2015 04:38AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/ter.12176

  2. Lateral extrusion along the Altyn Tagh Fault, Qilian Shan (NE Tibet): insight from a 3D crustal budget

    Feng Cheng, Marc Jolivet, Guillaume Dupont-Nivet, Lin Wang, Xiangjiang Yu and Zhaojie Guo

    Accepted manuscript online: 16 AUG 2015 04:45AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/ter.12173

  3. For the deep biosphere, the present is not always the key to the past: what we can learn from the geological record

    Patrick Meister

    Accepted manuscript online: 16 AUG 2015 04:45AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/ter.12174

  4. The middle and upper Lochkovian (Lower Devonian) conodont successions in key peri-Gondwana localities (Spanish Central Pyrenees and Prague Synform) and their relevance for global correlations

    Jose Ignacio Valenzuela-Ríos, Ladislav Slavík, Jau-Chyn Liao, Helena Calvo, Aneta Hušková and Leona Chadimová

    Accepted manuscript online: 12 AUG 2015 01:28AM EST | DOI: 10.1111/ter.12172

  5. Quantification of both normal and right-lateral late Quaternary activity along the Kongur Shan extensional system, Chinese Pamir

    Marie-Luce Chevalier, Jiawei Pan, Haibing Li, Dongliang Liu and Meng Wang

    Article first published online: 31 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/ter.12170

More

The onset of glaciation in Greenland:

Large-scale glaciations in the Arctic only began about 2.7 million years ago; before that, the northern hemisphere had been largely free of ice for more than 500 million years. What factors allowed the glaciation of Greenland to begin? Steinberger et al. identify three solid-Earth processes that played an important role. Firstly, the Iceland plume was directly beneath East Greenland from about 60 to 30 million years ago. This is the likely reason why the lithosphere there even today is only about 90 km thick. More recent pulses of hot material rising through the Iceland plume could flow beneath the thin lithosphere. The most recent pulse arrived there during the past 10 million years, and uplifted East Greenland, forming high mountains. Secondly, tectonic plate motion moved Greenland northward. And thirdly, a shift in the Earth's axis termed 'True Polar Wander' had the effect of moving Greenland still further north. The combined effect was a northward shift of about 18° during the past 60 million years. Hence Greenland was only recently sufficiently far north, and its mountain tops in the east were sufficiently high, that glaciations could be initiated.

Read the full article:
The key role of global solid-Earth processes in preconditioning Greenland's glaciation since the Pliocene
Bernhard Steinberger, Wim Spakman, Peter Japsen and Trond H. Torsvik
[DOI 10.1111/ter.12133]

Advice for Chinese Authors

Are you a Chinese Author? Do you need advice on writing a paper?

Good practice in authoring manuscripts

This article, written by Professor Stuart Lane, editor of Earth Surface Processes and Landforms,  provides excellent guidelines for Chinese authors. The article has been translated into local language for easy reading and comprehension.



Excellent Reasons to Publish Your Next Paper in Terra Nova

For Authors

Terra Nova publishes short, innovative and provocative papers of interest to a wide readership, covering the broadest spectrum of the Solid Earth and Planetary Sciences.

Why you should publish your next article in Terra Nova:

Wide range of subjects covered: geology, geophysics and geochemistry, extending to the fluid envelopes (atmosphere, ocean, environment) whenever coupling with the Solid Earth is involved. Interdisciplinary articles particularly welcome.

Impact Factor: 2.639

Unique format:
2500 word limit, no page limit, as many figures and tables as necessary
articles can contain data, video files etc as supporting information

Fast Publication:
average of 64 days from submission to first decision
average of 34 days from acceptance to online publication in Early View
articles posted online within a week of acceptance in our Accepted Articles section

Help and support throughout the publication process:
English language editing services available
optimise your work for search engines with our SEO guidelines
track your articles through production
questions or problems: the Editorial Office is only an email away

High quality maintained through rigorous peer-review

High Online Usage: available at more than 4000 institutions worldwide

Colour figures reproduced free of charge in the online version of the article. Low cost for colour images in the print version, or supply black-and-white versions for free printing

Discounts:
25% discount for published authors on all wiley books
30 days free access to Terra Nova when you submit your article

CrossRef Links: researchers can move from a reference directly to your article

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Making your article OnlineOpen increases its potential readership and enables you to meet institutional and funder open access mandates where they apply. Authors of OnlineOpen articles may immediately post the final, published PDF of their article on a website, institutional repository or other free public server. OnlineOpen complies with new open access mandates from RCUK and Wellcome Trust.

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