Clinical and Experimental Optometry

Cover image for Vol. 99 Issue 5

Edited By: H. Barry Collin

Impact Factor: 1.28

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 39/56 (Ophthalmology)

Online ISSN: 1444-0938

Virtual Issue: Handicap of abnormal vision


Published online: 28 Jul 2010
Last updated: 2 Dec 2013

Introduction:

Abnormal colour vision has been recognised as a handicap in some occupations and for many everyday tasks for more than 150 years.

Edinburgh Chemistry Professor George Wilson was the first to report that abnormal colour vision was common and in 1855 wrote about the danger of abnormal colour vision for railway men and seafarers. It can be a handicap in any occupation in which colours are used to code information, and it can be a problem at school where colours are used to identify or group objects, and in sport and art.

This virtual issue gives quick access to the full text of papers on the handicap of abnormal colour vision, which have been published in Clinical and Experimental Optometry since 1970.

The handicap of abnormal colour vision
Barry L Cole
Clin Exp Optom 2004; 87: 258-275.

Assessment of inherited colour vision defects in clinical practice
Barry L Cole
Clin Exp Optom 2007; 90: 157-175.

Search for coloured objects in natural surroundings by people with abnormal colour vision
Barry L Cole
Clin Exp Optom 2006; 89: 144-149.

Orienteers with poor colour vision require more than cunning running
Jennifer A Long and Barbara M Junghans
Clin Exp Optom 2008; 91: 515-523.

One of Australia's greatest cricketers was a protanope: a genetic detective story solved with the help of Schmidt's sign
Ross W Harris and Barry L Cole
Clin Exp Optom 2005; 88: 405-409.

Abnormal colour vision is a handicap to playing cricket but not an insurmountable one
Ross W Harris and Barry L Cole
Clin Exp Optom 2007; 90: 451-456.

The effect of abnormal colour vision on the ability to identify and outline coloured clinical signs and to count stained bacilli in sputum
John L Campbell, Lewis Griffin, J Anthony B Spalding and Fraz A Mir
Clin Exp Optom 2005; 88: 376-381.

Confessions of a colour blind optometrist
David M Cockburn
Clin Exp Optom 2004; 87: 350-352.

Confessions of a colour blind physician
J Anthony, B Spalding
Clin Exp Optom 2004; 87: 344-349.

The description of physical signs of illness in photographs by physicians with abnormal colour vision
John L Campbell, J Anthony, B Spalding and Fraz A Mir
Clin Exp Optom 2004; 87: 334-338.

Protan colour vision deficiency and road accidents
Barry L Cole
Clin Exp Optom 2002; 85: 246-253.

Protans and driving safety
Richard JB Wolfe, Algis J Vingry
Clin Exp Optom 2002; 85: 399-402.

The colour blind driver
Barry L Cole
Aust J Optom 1970; 53: 261-269.

Colour blindness does not preclude fame as an artist: celebrated Australian artist Clifton Pugh was a protanope
Barry L Cole, Ross W Harris
Clin Exp Optom 2009; 92: 421-428.

An artist with extreme deuteranomaly
Barry L Cole and Jonathon Nathan
Clin Exp Optom 2002; 85: 300-305.

The painter and handicapped vision
Jonathon Nathan
Clin Exp Optom 2002; 85: 309-314.

Colour vision defects in children with learning difficulties
Jillian I Dwyer
Clin Exp Optom 1991; 74: 30-38.

The X-Chrom lens: a case study
David C Pye and Stephen J Dain
Clin Exp Optom 1988; 71: 91-93.

Colour vision and tinted contact lenses
Annie Tan, Lilli Ting and Christine Wildsoet
Clin Exp Optom 1987; 70: 78-81.

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