Language Learning

Cover image for Vol. 67 Issue 1

General Editor: General Editor: Nick C. Ellis / Journal Editor: Pavel Trofimovich / Associate Journal Editor: Emma Marsden / Associate Journal Editor: Kara Morgan-Short / Associate Journal Editor: Scott Crossley / Monograph Series Editor: Marianne Gullberg / LL Cognitive Neuroscience Series Editor: Núria Sebastián-Gallés / Executive Director: Scott Jarvis / Associate Executive Director: Jeff Connor-Linton

Impact Factor: 1.869

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 10/181 (Linguistics); 25/231 (Education & Educational Research)

Online ISSN: 1467-9922

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    Volume 67, Issue 1

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    Volume 66, Issue 4

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Key Articles

2016 Language Learning Outstanding Article of the Year - Free to Download

The members of the Board of Directors of Language Learning are pleased to continue our annual award for the article that the Board members consider to be the most outstanding among those published in the previous year’s volume of the journal. For Volume 66 in 2016, we are delighted to grant this award to:

Schepens, J. J., van der Slik, F., & van Hout, R. (2016). L1 and L2 distance effects in learning L3 Dutch. Language Learning, 66, 224-256. doi:10.1111/lang.12150

This study is unique in many respects. It addresses two problems of great current relevance: whether language distance can explain the amount of effort needed to achieve a high level of global speaking proficiency in a target language, and whether multilinguals are better at language learning than monolinguals in a gradual, additive sense or in a multiplicative sense. The data include the scores of 39,300 multilingual test-takers on a high-stakes test of Dutch speaking proficiency collected over a 15-year period. The database is remarkable not only in terms of its size, but also because it (a) involves a direct measure of global speaking proficiency indexed to the highly interpretable European CEFR proficiency scale, (b) includes multilingual learners of Dutch from 56 L1 backgrounds and 35 L2 backgrounds, and (c) includes additional useful information about the learners’ language and educational histories. The study’s analysis is also impressive. To perform their analyses, the researchers developed rigorous methods of assessing cross-linguistic lexical and morphological similarity and performed sophisticated analyses of these effects in L3 learning. The statistical power of the design is compelling, and the results are interesting and persuasively differentiate between several existing theories of transfer.

2015 Language Learning Outstanding Article of the Year

The Board of Directors of Language Learning are pleased to continue our annual award for the article that the Board members consider to be the most outstanding among those published in the previous year’s volume of the journal. For Volume 65 in 2015, we are delighted to grant this award to:

Isurin, L., & Seidel, C. (2015). Traces of Memory for a Lost Childhood: The Savings Paradigm Expanded.  Language Learning, 65 (4), 761–790. DOI: 10.1111/lang.12133

The study is a fascinating case study of a woman who had been adopted at age three but had no knowledge of who her parents were or which language they had spoken to her. In order to determine what her lost language was and whether she still retained remnants of it, the researchers acted quickly to bring relevant methods and expertise to bear. They did this with methodological rigor tempered with pragmatism. They also developed a new method for the investigation of language loss, retooling an existing methodology (the savings paradigm) for new purposes. The study is reported in good detail, the evidence is interpreted cautiously, and the report is well written and engaging.

2014 Language Learning Outstanding Article of the Year

The Board of Directors of Language Learning are pleased to continue our annual award for the article that the Board members consider to be the most outstanding among those published in the previous year’s volume of the journal. For Volume 64 in 2014, we are delighted to grant this award to:

Novogrodsky, R., Caldwell-Harris, C., Fish, S. & Hoffmeister, R. (2014) The development of antonym knowledge in American Sign Language (ASL) and its relationship to reading comprehension in English. Language Learning, 64 (4), 749–770. DOI: 10.1111/lang.12078

The article reports on the acquisition of antonym knowledge and reading comprehension in a large population of deaf students from across the US as a function of their age and parental deafness/signing status. The research was carefully designed, representing many hundreds of hours of meticulous work. The findings have important implications for understanding how early language exposure affects the development of vocabulary knowledge and, in turn, reading comprehension, providing a rigorous demonstration of the importance of L1 development (in ASL) for L2 reading comprehension (English).

News

Language Learning is participating in the Center for Open Science $1,000,000 Preregistration challenge

Preregistered Badge

Early in 2016, the Center for Open Science (COS) announced a new open science initiative—one thousand researchers from various fields of science will win $1,000 each for publishing results of preregistered research. Language Learning is one of the select journals across various disciplines that are eligible for this initiative. If you wish to participate, follow the steps outlined by COS: preregister the design of your study with the Open Science Framework (for review and approval by COS), carry out the study, and submit your manuscript to Language Learning, provided the manuscript directly relates to fundamental issues of language learning and development. To be eligible for the prize, your published manuscript would then be reviewed by COS for adherence to the preregistration. By submitting a manuscript that reports a preregistered study, you will contribute to a most worthy cause—promoting transparency and reproducibility of research in language sciences! For more information, see https://cos.io/prereg/.

Although Language Learning is supportive of this initiative, preregistering your study with COS does not guarantee acceptance with Language Learning.


The 2014 Language Learning Cognitive Series volume, edited by Monika Molnar and Nuria Sebastian-Galles, is available for purchase at wiley.com, or included with a 2014 subscription to Language Learning.

Click here for more information about the Language Learning Cognitive Series.


The 2014 Language Learning Monograph Series volume, authored by Caroline Coffin and Jim Donohue, is available for purchase from wiley.com, or included with a 2014 subscription to Language Learning.

Click here for more information about the Language Learning Monograph Series.


Language Learning is now listed as a charitable organization with AmazonSmile. Click below to add Language Learning as your AmazonSmile organization today!

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Grant Schemes

Grant Schemes - mortarboard image


Language Learning supports scholarship and research in language studies by means of a variety of grant programs:

  • The Language Learning Dissertation Grant Program
  • The Language Learning Roundtable Conference Program
  • The Language Learning Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence Program
  • The Language Learning Small Grants Research Program
  • The Language Learning Visiting Research Assistant Professorship

These schemes are described in the frontmatter of the journal and on the Grants page.

LL Book Series

Language Learning Book Covers

Language Learningcurrently publishes three book series:

Language Learning Monograph Series


Currents in Language Learning Series


Language Learning Cognitive Neuroscience Series

Language Learningalso published the Best of Language Learning Series from 2001 to 2011.

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