Journal of Metamorphic Geology

Cover image for Vol. 34 Issue 7

Edited By: Michael Brown, Katy Evans, Doug Robinson, Richard White and Donna Whitney

Impact Factor: 3.673

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 3/47 (Geology)

Online ISSN: 1525-1314

Open- and closed-system processes in the formation of migmatites and migmatitic granulites


Migmatites are widely interpreted to have been formed by partial melting, particularly by hydrate-breakdown melting reactions, and processes in melt-bearing rocks feature prominently in subsequent sections. However, this view of migmatite formation was not always as widely held as at the present. For example, in the Quetico Metasedimentary Belt layer-parallel leucosomes were interpreted to have formed by a formed by a subsolidus, stress-induced mass transfer process that enabled mobilization of the quartz and feldspar from the host rocks to form leucosomes by pressure solution (Sawyer & Barnes, 1988). In contrast, discordant leucosomes in these rocks were interpreted to represent injected, variably fractionated melts generated during exhumation.

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Sawyer, E.W. & Barnes, S.J., 1988. Temporal and compositional differences between subsolidus and anatectic migmatite leucosomes from the Quetico metasedimentary belt, Canada. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 6, 437-450

Hansen, E.C., Newton, R.C. & Janardhan, A.S., 1984. Fluid inclusions in rocks from the amphibolite-facies gneiss to charnockite progression in southern Karnataka, India: direct evidence concerning the fluids of granulite metamorphism Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 2, 249-264.

Hollister, L.S. 1988. On the origin of CO2-rich fluid inclusions in migmatites. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 6, 467–474.

Whitney, D.L., 1992. Origin of CO2-rich fluid inclusions in leucosomes from the Skagit migmatites, North Cascades, Washington, USA. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 10, 715–725.

Giorgetti, G., Frezzotti, M.-L., Palmeri, R. & Burke, E.A.J., 1996. Role of fluids in migmatites: CO2-H2O fluid inclusions in leucosomes from the Deep Freeze Range migmatites (Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica). Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 14, 307–317.

Johannes, W., 1988. What controls partial melting in migmatites? Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 6, 451–465.

Sorensen, S.S., 1988, Petrology of amphibolite-facies mafic and ultramafic rocks from the Catalina Schist, Southern California; metasomatism and migmatization in a subduction zone metamorphic setting. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 6, 405–435.

Pattison, D.R.M. & Harte, B., 1988. Evolution of structurally contrasting migmatites in the 3-kbar Ballachulish aureole, Scotland. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 6, 475–494.

Linklater, C.M., Harte, B. & Fallick, A.E., 1994. A stable isotope study of the migmatitic rocks in the Ballachulish contact aureole, Scotland. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 12, 273–283.

Mogk, D.W. 1992. Ductile shearing and migmatization at midcrustal levels in an Archean high-grade gneiss belt, Northern Gallatin Range, Montana, USA. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 10, 427–438.

Johnson, T.E., Hudson, N.F.C. & Droop, G.T.R., 2001. Partial melting in the Inzie Head gneisses: the role of water and a petrogenetic grid in KFMASH applicable to anatectic pelitic migmatites. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 19, 99–118.

Maaløe, S., 1992. Melting and diffusion processes in closed-system migmatization. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 10, 503–516.

Bea, F., 1989. A method for modelling mass balance in partial melting and anatectic leucosome segregation. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 7, 619–628.

Olsen, S. N. & Grant, J. A., 1991. Isocon analysis of migmatization in the Front Range, Colorado, USA. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 9, 151–164.

Pattison, D.R.M., 1991. Infiltration-driven dehydration and anatexis in granulite facies metagabbro, Grenville Province, Ontario, Canada. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 6, 315–332.

Jung, S., Mezger, K., Masberg, P., Hoffer, E. & Hoernes, S., 1998. Petrology of an intrusion-related high-grade migmatite: implications for partial melting of metasedimentary rocks and leucosome-forming processes. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 16, 425–445.

Waters, D.J., 1988. Partial melting and the formation of granulite facies assemblages in Namaqualand, South Africa. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 6, 387–404.

Hartel, T.H.D. & Pattison, D.R.M., 1996. Genesis of the Kapuskasing (Ontario) migmatitic mafic granulites by dehydration melting of amphibolite: The importance of quartz to reaction progress. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 14, 591–611.

Harley, S.L., Thompson, P., Hensen, B.J. & Buick, I.S., 2002. Cordierite as a sensor of fluid conditions in high-grade metamorphism and crustal anatexis. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 20, 71–86.

Daczko, N.R., Clarke, G.L. & Klepeis, K.A., 2001. Transformation of two-pyroxene hornblende granulite to garnet granulite involving simultaneous melting and fracturing of the lower crust, Fiordland, New Zealand. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 19, 547–560.

Blattner, P, 2005. Transport of low-aH2O dehydration products to melt sites via reaction-zone networks, Milford Sound, New Zealand. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 23, 569–578.

Clarke, G.L., Daczko, N.R., Klepeis, K.A. & Rushmer, T., 2005. Roles for fluid and/or melt advection in forming high-P mafic migmatites, Fiordland, New Zealand. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 23, 557–567.

White, R.W., Pomroy, N. E. & Powell, R., 2005. An in situ metatexite–diatexite transition in upper amphibolite facies rocks from Broken Hill, Australia. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 23, 579–602.

Lancaster, P. J., Fu, B., Page, F.Z., Kita, N.T., Bickford, M.E., Hill, B.M., McLelland, J.M. & Valley, J.W., 2009. Genesis of metapelitic migmatites in the Adirondack Mountains, New York. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 27, 41–54.

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