Journal of Phycology

Cover image for Vol. 51 Issue 1

Edited By: Debashish Bhattacharya, Michael Graham, Arthur Grossman, Jonathan Zehr

Impact Factor: 2.529

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 17/103 (Marine & Freshwater Biology); 50/199 (Plant Sciences)

Online ISSN: 1529-8817

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  • Coralline algae (Rhodophyta) in a changing world: integrating ecological, physiological, and geochemical responses to global change

    Coralline algae (Rhodophyta) in a changing world: integrating ecological, physiological, and geochemical responses to global change

    Temperate, subtidal Lithothamnion glaciale rhodolith bed off west coast of Scotland. Photo by N. Kamenos.

  • Finding of 132, 173-cyclopheophorbide a enol as a degradation product of chlorophyll in shrunk zooxanthellae of the coral Montipora digitata

    Finding of 132, 173‐cyclopheophorbide a enol as a degradation product of chlorophyll in shrunk zooxanthellae of the coral Montipora digitata

    Types of zooxanthellae observed in coral tissue. (a,b) Healthy cells with a spherical shape and expanded chloroplast. (c,d) Shrunken, darkly colored cells with reduced sizes and partially fragmented chloroplasts. (e) Bleached cells with pale and colorless chloroplasts. (f) Three categories of zooxanthellae. (g) White light micrograph and (h) fluorescence image of healthy and shrunken cells (shrunken cells are indicated by arrowheads).

  • Characterization and comparison of toxin-producing isolates of Dinophysis acuminata from New England and Canada

    Characterization and comparison of toxin‐producing isolates of Dinophysis acuminata from New England and Canada

    Scanning electron micrographs of preserved cultured Dinophysis cells. (a, b): Dinophysis acuminata DAEP01; (c, d): D. acuminata DAMV01; (e, f): D. acuminata DABOF02.

  • Phylogeny and toxicology of Lyngbya wollei (Cyanobacteria, Oscillatoriales) from north-eastern Australia, with a description of Microseira gen. nov.

    Phylogeny and toxicology of Lyngbya wollei (Cyanobacteria, Oscillatoriales) from north‐eastern Australia, with a description of Microseira gen. nov.

    Morphology of Microseira wollei strains from north-eastern Australia (A) mature filament with yellow, lamellated sheath and attached epiphytes, (B) immature filament without coloration and lamellations, (C) cultured strain (YC0404) with fine, colorless sheath; scale bar = 30 μm.

  • Spermatogenesis and auxospore structure in the multipolar centric diatom Hydrosera

    Spermatogenesis and auxospore structure in the multipolar centric diatom Hydrosera

    Spermatogenesis in Hydrosera triquetra. Cells stained with DAPI (A, B, E, H, I, L) and with a monoclonal anti-α-tubulin antibody (D–G, N–S) were observed under fluorescence microscopy and/or DIC. (A) Chain-forming vegetative cells with many discoidal chloroplasts and a nucleus at the center. (B) Spermatogonia undergoing mitosis without cytokinesis. Each cell has eight nuclei. (C–E) Different images of a spermatogonium. (C) Interference contrast image. (D) Immunolocalization of α-tubulin. (E) Merged image of α-tubulin (green) and DNA localization (blue). (F, G) Immunofluorescence images of a spermatogonium in anaphase stained with DAPI (F) and anti-α-tubulin (G). (H). Fluorescence+DIC image of a spermatogonium. All nuclei (at least 16) were located near the surface of the cytoplasm. (I) Fluorescence+DIC image of a spermatogonium: the contracted cell bears round nuclei on its surface, in an early stage of sperm formation. (J) Two spermatogonia, each with many sperm and a residual body. (K, L) Interference contrast image (K) and DAPI (L) images of a filament of cells showing different stages of meiosis and spermatogenesis. The dotted lines mark the boundaries between adjacent cells. Meiotic (left, central two and right) cells contain between four and eight nuclei, while the three other cells each contain 32 sperm. (M) An enlargement of the dotted rectangle in (L) shows a single uniflagellate sperm in profile (arrow). (N–S) Serial foci of sperm with immunolocalized α-tubulin (N–P, R, S) and a DIC image (Q). Note strands of tubulin running beneath the cell surface from the front of the sperm cell, which bears a single flagellum (arrow in [N]). Scale bars, 20 μm (A, B, H, I, J, K, L) or 10 μm (C–G, M–R).

  • Identification of the resting cyst of Cochlodinium polykrikoides Margalef (Dinophyceae, Gymnodiniales) in Korean coastal sediments

    Identification of the resting cyst of Cochlodinium polykrikoides Margalef (Dinophyceae, Gymnodiniales) in Korean coastal sediments

    Light and fluorescence micrographs of Cochlodinium polykrikoides germinated from a resting cyst. (A, B) A motile cell germinated from the resting cyst after 5 d of incubation, with an orange-pigmented body located in the hypocone (arrow); (C–H) motile cells germinated from the resting cyst after 14 d of incubation: (C, D) ventral view showing the position of the sulcus (s); (E, F) dorsal view showing the position of the sulcus (s) and an orange-pigmented body positioned in the epicone (arrow); (G) optical cross-section showing transverse flagellum (tf) and longitudinal flagellum (lf); (H) autofluorescence of chloroplasts, with a surface view showing many rod-like chloroplasts; and (I) SYTOX Green-stained cell showing an elliptical nucleus (N) positioned at the anterior of the cell. Scale bars: 10 μm.

  • Coralline algae (Rhodophyta) in a changing world: integrating ecological, physiological, and geochemical responses to global change
  • Finding of 132, 173‐cyclopheophorbide a enol as a degradation product of chlorophyll in shrunk zooxanthellae of the coral Montipora digitata
  • Characterization and comparison of toxin‐producing isolates of Dinophysis acuminata from New England and Canada
  • Phylogeny and toxicology of Lyngbya wollei (Cyanobacteria, Oscillatoriales) from north‐eastern Australia, with a description of Microseira gen. nov.
  • Spermatogenesis and auxospore structure in the multipolar centric diatom Hydrosera
  • Identification of the resting cyst of Cochlodinium polykrikoides Margalef (Dinophyceae, Gymnodiniales) in Korean coastal sediments

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