Journal of Phycology

Cover image for Vol. 52 Issue 1

Edited By: Debashish Bhattacharya, Michael Graham, Arthur Grossman, Jonathan Zehr

Impact Factor: 2.844

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 11/103 (Marine & Freshwater Biology); 43/204 (Plant Sciences)

Online ISSN: 1529-8817

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  • Etheliaceae fam. nov. (Gigartinales, Rhodophyta), with a clarification of the generitype of Ethelia and the addition of six novel species from warm waters

    Etheliaceae fam. nov. (Gigartinales, Rhodophyta), with a clarification of the generitype of Ethelia and the addition of six novel species from warm waters

    Ethelia umbricola sp. nov.: (A) Holotype specimens (CWS/CEL 09-34-17), arrow denotes specimen used for DNA extraction; (B) RVS of crust through end of large axial filament nearly median in thallus (TRP 12-42-1); (C) RVS of crust at margin with layered tiers of ascending cells and lower surface conforming to substratum (CWS/CEL 05-10-13); (D) RVS of crust through end of axial filament showing ascending and descending files of cells, (CWS/CEL 10-29-9); (E) RVS of crust with smooth dorsal surface of tiered ascending cells and arching descending filaments composing lower crust (CWS/CEL 09-34-17); (F) Transverse section through two axial filaments (arrows) near ventral surface (CWS/CEL 09-34-17); (G) Section through dorsal surface showing tiered ascending elongate cortical cells (CWS/CEL 09-34-17).

  • Delimiting species in the Phacus longicauda complex (Euglenida) through morphological and molecular analyses

    Delimiting species in the Phacus longicauda complex (Euglenida) through morphological and molecular analyses

    Light microscope photographs showing an overview of living cells of the studied Phacus strains (=isolates): (a–c) Phacus cordata: (a, b) heard-shaped cells of the strain UW1808Ur17, (c) strain UW1727SRz. (d–f) oval, leaf-oblate cells of Phacus longicauda: (d) strain UW1896Laz, (e) strain UW2010Jez, (f) strain UW2002Blo, (g–i) Phacus rotunda, spoon-shaped cells, the central part of the cell—bulging, edges lie flat on the substrate (arrowheads): (g) strain UW1821Ora, (h) strain UW1790Ur19, (i) strain UW1939Gor, (j–l) Phacus circumflexus: (j, k) strain UW1844Jel, widely oval cells with edges bent inwards (arrowheads), (l) strain UW1831Rud, the cell twisted at the base of the tail (arrowhead); (m, n) Phacus tortus strain UW1845Jel, widely oval, helicoidally twisted cells. (o, p) Phacus crassus sp. nov., strain UW1566Ur15, widely oval, semi-flattened cells, slightly spirally twisted, with a short “S”-shaped fold; (q) Phacus cristatus sp. nov, strain UW1929Dol, widely oval, semi-flattened cells with a fold, spirally twisted. (r) Phacus helikoides strain UW1658Ur20, the cell spirally twisted along the whole length. Scale bars 30 μm.

  • New diagnostic characters for the order Sporolithales (Corallinophycidae, Rhodophyta)

    New diagnostic characters for the order Sporolithales (Corallinophycidae, Rhodophyta)

    Carposporangial conceptacle anatomy of three species of Sporolithon. (A) Longitudinal section through uniporate conceptacle of S. episporum showing oblong carposporangia distributed across floor and walls of conceptacle chamber (RB 547948). (B) Magnified view of carposporangial conceptacle of S. episporum showing one-celled filaments (arrows) that bear terminal oblong carposporangia (C). Note absence of central fusion cell (UWC RB 09/45). (C) Longitudinal section through carposporangial conceptacle of S. ptychoides showing oblong carposporangia distributed across floor and walls of conceptacle chamber (RB 579171). (D) Magnified view of carposporangial conceptacle of S. ptychoides showing one-celled filaments (arrows) that bear terminal, oblong carposporangia (C). Note absence of central fusion cell (RB 579171). (E) Longitudinal section though carposporangial conceptacle of Sporolithon sp. showing oblong carposporangia distributed across floor and walls of conceptacle chamber (RB 614603). (F) Magnified view of carposporangial conceptacle of Sporolithon sp. showing one-celled filaments (arrows) that bear terminal, oblong carposporangia (C). Note absence of central fusion cell (RB 614603).

  • Different strategies of energy storage in cultured and freshly isolated Symbiodinium sp.

    Different strategies of energy storage in cultured and freshly isolated Symbiodinium sp.

    Microscopic photogra-phy of each fraction isolated from A. puchella (a), P. damicornis (b) and M. stellata (c). First row of panels (-1): the homogenate before sucrose gradient; second row of panels (-2): the upper layer containing intact host cells; third row of panels (-3): the middle layer containing Symbio-dinium; fourth row of panels (-4): the bottom layer containing nematocyst with Symbiodinium and other debris; scale bar: 10 μm.

  • Balechina and the new genus Cucumeridinium gen. nov. (Dinophyceae), unarmored dinoflagellates with thick cell coverings

    Balechina and the new genus Cucumeridinium gen. nov. (Dinophyceae), unarmored dinoflagellates with thick cell coverings

    Light micrographs of Balechina coerulea. (a–e, h–n) Specimens from Banyuls sur Mer. (f) Specimens from Marseille. (m–q) Specimens from Valencia. (g, s–u) Specimens from São Sebastião Channel. (a–f) Dividing cells by oblique binary fission. (b, c) Specimen with an elongate apex, similar to Gymnodinium canus. (e, f) Two daughter cells before separation. (f) Depigmentation. Note that the colored spheres remained in the apex and antapex. (g) Two pairs of daughter cells. The arrow points the elongate episome attached to the episome of the daughter cell. (h) Blue color is bleached. (i, j) Change in coloration and shape of a single specimen. Isolated cell FG764 (GenBank accession number #KR139786). (k–m) Serial micrographs of the depigmentation and shape change in a single specimen. (m) Note the dissolution of the pigment in the surrounding water. (m–r) Serial pictures of the autotomy of a single specimen. (o) The arrow points the place where the autotomy begins in the episome and hyposome. (q) The arrow points the transversal flagellum. (s) Specimen beginning the autotomy. (t, u) Cells under regeneration after autotomy. n, nucleus; tf, transversal flagellum; scale bars, 50 μm.

  • A combined morphological, ultrastructural, molecular, and biochemical study of the peculiar family Gomontiellaceae (Oscillatoriales) reveals a new cylindrospermopsin-producing clade of cyanobacteria

    A combined morphological, ultrastructural, molecular, and biochemical study of the peculiar family Gomontiellaceae (Oscillatoriales) reveals a new cylindrospermopsin‐producing clade of cyanobacteria

    Morphology of the members of the family Gomontiellaceae. (a, b) Hormoscilla pringsheimii CCALA 1054. (c–e) Hormoscilla pringsheimii SAG 1407-1. (f, g) “Crinalium magnum” SAG 34.87. (h–k) Starria zimbabweënsis SAG 74.90. (l–o) Crinalium epipsammum SAG 22.89. (p–v) Gomontiella subtubulosa, type material, from permanent slide. Scale bar applies to all figures; for figures a, c, d, f, h, j–n, q–v = 20 μm; for figures b, e, g, i, o, p = 100 μm.

  • Etheliaceae fam. nov. (Gigartinales, Rhodophyta), with a clarification of the generitype of Ethelia and the addition of six novel species from warm waters
  • Delimiting species in the Phacus longicauda complex (Euglenida) through morphological and molecular analyses
  • New diagnostic characters for the order Sporolithales (Corallinophycidae, Rhodophyta)
  • Different strategies of energy storage in cultured and freshly isolated Symbiodinium sp.
  • Balechina and the new genus Cucumeridinium gen. nov. (Dinophyceae), unarmored dinoflagellates with thick cell coverings
  • A combined morphological, ultrastructural, molecular, and biochemical study of the peculiar family Gomontiellaceae (Oscillatoriales) reveals a new cylindrospermopsin‐producing clade of cyanobacteria

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