Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research

Cover image for Vol. 40 Issue 2

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Henry R. Kranzler, M.D.

Impact Factor: 3.205

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 5/18 (Substance Abuse)

Online ISSN: 1530-0277

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  1. 1 - 16
  1. Original Articles

    1. Chronic Alcohol Consumption Causes Liver Injury in High-Fructose-Fed Male Mice Through Enhanced Hepatic Inflammatory Response

      Ming Song, Theresa Chen, Russell A. Prough, Matthew C. Cave and Craig J. McClain

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.12994

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      Song and colleagues show that the combination of dietary high fructose (F) plus chronic alcohol (CE) synergistically induces liver injury. Moreover, high fructose plus ethanol (FE) fed mice are characterized by prominent microvesicular steatosis and enhanced hepatic inflammatory response, suggesting that the dietary fructose–alcohol combination contributes to the disease progression, and fructose is a dietary “second hit” in the transition of steatosis to steatohepatitis in alcoholic liver disease.

    2. PPAR Agonists: I. Role of Receptor Subunits in Alcohol Consumption in Male and Female Mice

      Yuri A. Blednov, Mendy Black, Jillian M. Benavidez, Eleni E. Stamatakis and R. Adron Harris

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.12976

    3. PPAR Agonists: II. Fenofibrate and Tesaglitazar Alter Behaviors Related to Voluntary Alcohol Consumption

      Yuri A. Blednov, Mendy Black, Jillian M. Benavidez, Eleni E. Stamatakis and R. Adron Harris

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.12972

    4. Involvement of Endocannabinoids in Alcohol “Binge” Drinking: Studies of Mice with Human Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Genetic Variation and After CB1 Receptor Antagonists

      Yan Zhou, Ted Huang, Francis Lee and Mary Jeanne Kreek

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.12989

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      Genotypic difference in alcohol intake in 4-day drinking-in-the-dark model (A) and alcohol preference on day 5 (B) in FAAH knock-in mice: alcohol intake was recorded at 4-h time point for 4 consecutive days in FAAHA/A, FAAHC/A, and FAAHC/C mice; the mice were then tested on day 5 for alcohol vs. water preference. FAAHA/A mice showed greater alcohol intake and preference than wild-type FAAHC/C mice, suggesting that increased endocannabinoid signaling in FAAHA/A mice led to increased alcohol “binge” consumption.

    5. Exposure to Alcohol Use in Motion Pictures and Teen Drinking in Latin America

      Raul Mejia, Adriana Pérez, Erika N. Abad-Vivero, Christy Kollath-Cattano, Inti Barrientos-Gutierrez, James F. Thrasher and James D. Sargent

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.12986

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      This study examines whether exposure to alcohol use in films is associated with alcohol use in 13,295 middle school students from public and private schools in two Latin American countries. This figure shows the crude association between exposure to alcohol in popular films and alcohol use susceptibility, current alcohol use, and binge drinking. After adjustment, higher levels of exposure to alcohol use in films were associated with higher likelihood of alcohol use in Latin American adolescents.

    6. Associations Between Recent Heavy Drinking and Dorsal Anterior Cingulate N-Acetylaspartate and Glutamate Concentrations in Non-Treatment-Seeking Individuals with Alcohol Dependence

      James J. Prisciandaro, Joseph P. Schacht, Andrew P. Prescot, Perry F. Renshaw, Truman R. Brown and Raymond F. Anton

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.12977

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      Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) studies have historically focused on severe, treatment-seeking alcoholics, and few studies have investigated associations between neurochemistry and alcohol consumption. In this study, 19 treatment-naïve alcoholics completed a 2D J-resolved 1H-MRS scan. For the past 2 weeks, the number of heavy drinking days was significantly inversely associated with dorsal anterior cingulate glutamate/water (left) and NAA/water (right) concentrations. These findings may suggest that amount of recent alcohol consumption may account for differences in neuronal metabolism, even in nonsevere, non-treatment-seeking alcoholics.

    7. Levels of Hair Ethyl Glucuronide in Patients with Decreased Kidney Function: Possibility of Misclassification of Social Drinkers

      Jan Toralf Fosen, Luca Morini, Cristina Sempio, Rudiger Ganss, Jørg Mørland and Gudrun Høiseth

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.12970

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      The use of hair ethyl glucuronide (EtG) levels as a direct biomarker for chronic high intake of ethanol is increasing, and misclassification of alcohol consumption may have large implications. In this study, 20% (n = 8) of the individuals with decreased kidney function would have been misclassified as heavy drinkers according to the suggested EtG cutoff level for defining heavy drinking (30 pg/mg), in contrast to none of the healthy volunteers (p = 0.002).

    8. Multisensory Stop Signals Can Reduce the Disinhibiting Effects of Alcohol in Adults

      Walter Roberts, Ramey G. Monem and Mark T. Fillmore

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.12971

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      Multisensory stop signals reduce the degree to which alcohol impairs inhibitory control in adult drinkers. When no-go stimuli were unimodal (i.e., visual) signals, 0.64 g/kg alcohol increased the failures to inhibit responses compared with placebo (i.e., increased disinhibition). However, this disinhibiting effect of alcohol was not observed when the no-go stimuli were presented as multisensory (i.e., visual + aural) stop signals. This finding suggests that multisensory inhibitory signals can ameliorate the disinhibiting effects of alcohol.

    9. Early Onset Drinking Predicts Greater Level But Not Growth of Alcohol-Induced Blackouts Beyond the Effect of Binge Drinking During Emerging Adulthood

      Elise N. Marino and Kim Fromme

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.12981

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      Early-onset drinkers both experienced more frequent blackouts at Year 4 and continued to experience greater levels of blackouts over time, but they did not exhibit differential growth or change in reported blackouts, despite the fact that the time-varying effect of binge drinking on blackouts decreased across the three years. These findings indicate that there are likely unique neurobiological factors contributing to the experience of blackouts, such as altered hippocampal development and functioning resulting from early alcohol initiation. Notes: Covariate included in the model was sex; time-varying covariates included in the model were year-specific binge drinking. Frequency of alcohol-induced blackouts is based on a Likert scale (1–5). Early, middle, and late categories represent −1 standard deviation (SD), the mean, and +1 SD of the latent early-onset factor, respectively.

  2. Commentary

  3. Erratum

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      Erratum

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.13016

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      Erratum

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.13017

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      Erratum

      Article first published online: 17 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.12793

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      Influence of Alcohol Use and Family History of Alcoholism on Neural Response to Alcohol Cues in College Drinkers

      Vol. 37, Issue Supplement s1, E161–E171, Article first published online: 18 OCT 2012

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      Erratum

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.12768

      This article corrects:

      Commentary: Doxasozin for Alcoholism

      Vol. 37, Issue 2, 191–193, Article first published online: 27 DEC 2012

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      Erratum

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/acer.12723

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      How Is the Liver Primed or Sensitized for Alcoholic Liver Disease?

      Vol. 25, Issue Supplement s1, 171S–181S, Article first published online: 11 APR 2006

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      Erratum

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2012.01778.x

      This article corrects:

      fMRI Differences Between Subjects with Low and High Responses to Alcohol During a Stop Signal Task

      Vol. 36, Issue 1, 130–140, Article first published online: 17 OCT 2011

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