Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy

Cover image for Vol. 16 Issue 1

Edited By: Heather Bullock

Impact Factor: 0.98

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 24/41 (Social Issues); 50/62 (Psychology Social)

Online ISSN: 1530-2415

Associated Title(s): Journal of Social Issues, Social Issues and Policy Review

Virtual Issues


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Masi Noor, Promotion and Special Publication Editor
School of Psychology, Keel University, UK
masi.noor1@gmail.com

Virtual Issues from Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy

·          The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Virtual Issue for LGBT Pride Month
·          The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Virtual Issue on Earth Day
·          Theories of Radicalization
·          From Consumption to Climate Change
·          Helping in Natural Disasters
·          Social Psychology and Contemporary Immigration Policy
·          Military Social Influence
·          The Social Psychology of the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election

         
The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
Virtual Issue for LGBT Pride Month


Published: May 2015

Attitudes toward Same-Sex Marriage: An Essentialist Approach
Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy

Social Advocacy for Equal Marriage: The Politics of “Rights” and the Psychology of “Mental Health”
Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy

Anti-Equality Marriage Amendments and Sexual Stigma
Journal of Social Issues

The Rights and Responsibilities of Gay and Lesbian Parents: Legal Developments, Psychological Research and Policy Implications
Social Issues and Policy Review


The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
Virtual Issue on Earth Day


That Earth Day is celebrated speaks to people’s recognition of the intrinsic value of the natural world. In recognition of Earth Day, therefore, we have compiled four articles that help us understand why people are or are not good stewards of the planet. These works explore the psychological processes that affect environmental intentions and behaviors, spanning from beliefs, and motivations to evolutionarily adaptive biases.

Country Contexts and Individuals’ Climate Change Mitigating Behaviors: A Comparison of U.S. Versus German Individuals’ Efforts to Reduce Energy Use
Journal of Social Issues

The Emergency of Climate Change: Why Are We Failing to Take Action?
Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy

Hope for the Future in Mitigating Climate Change? On Statistically Modeling Self-Sacrifice in the Face of Global Warming
Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy

Naturally Green: Harnessing Stone Age Psychological Biases to Foster Environmental Behavior
Social Issues and Policy Review

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Theories of Radicalization

Published: August 2013

Fewer than 10% of Muslim Americans become radicalized. Nonetheless, it is worthwhile to try to isolate characteristics of those few who do espouse radical opinions. In the target article, Professor Clark McCauley reports that there is no single overarching global-jihad frame, rather, different facets of radical beliefs such as support for Al-Qaeda and for suicide bombers are largely unrelated. In commentary, distinguished contributors reflect upon both the psychological relationship between opinions and actions, and the parallel political relationship between the ‘war of ideas and the ‘war on terror.’

Testing Theories of Radicalization in Polls of U.S. Muslims
Clark McCauley

Radical Attitudes and Jihad: A Commentary on the Article by Clark McCauley (2012) Testing Theories of Radicalization in Polls of U.S. Muslims
Sam Mullins

Are They Terrorist Sympathizers or do They Just Disagree with the War on Terror? A Comment on Testing Theories of Radicalization in Polls of U.S. Muslims
Craig McGarty, Emma F. Thomas and Winnifred R. Louis

The Importance of Perspective Taking and Respect for Dignity in Understanding Radicalization
Lisa Molix and Charles P. Nichols

Ideas Versus Actions in Relation to Polls of U.S. Muslims
Clark McCauley

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From Consumption to Climate Change

Published: December 2012

The causes of climate change include not only the accumulation of carbon in the atmosphere, but also the actions of governments and industries, and these ultimately shape and are shaped by the behavior of individual citizens - their patterns of consumption and willingness to make sacrifices in the present for generations to come. In this collection of papers and commentary, authors examine relations between consumption, sacrifice, and climate change.

How Much Is Enough? Examining the Public's Beliefs About Consumption
Ezra M. Markowitz and Tom Bowerman

Hope for the Future? Understanding Self-Sacrifice Among Young Citizens of the World in the Face of Global Warming
James H. Liu and Chris G. Sibley

Sustainable Consumption: Attitudes, Actions, and Well-Being
Katherine D. Arbuthnott

Economic Development and Environmental Intentions: A Comment on Liu and Sibley (2011)
Katherine D. Arbuthnott, Daniel Devoe and Tricia Lawrie

Critical Reflections on a “Big Tent” Approach to Reducing Consumption
Keith R. Brown

Will People Act to Mitigate Climate Change?
Susan Clayton

Decoupling and Contextualizing Self-Sacrifice and Intentions to Act for the Benefit of the Environment
Darcy R. Dupuis and Steven Arnocky

Author Response to: The Attitude–Action Gap: Toward a Better Understanding of “How Much is Enough?”
Tom Bowerman and Ezra M. Markowitz

Hope for the Future in Mitigating Climate Change? On Statistically Modeling Self-Sacrifice in the Face of Global Warming
James H. Liu and Chris G. Sibley

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Helping in Natural Disasters

Published: December 2012

Even if disasters, both natural and human-made, are not increasing in frequency, they are becoming more familiar to us in our increasingly connected world. In this section, authors and commentators examine the roles of personality traits, conceptions of human responsibility, and situational characteristics of natural disasters in predicting the people who help and the conditions under which helping occurs.

Who Helps Natural-Disaster Victims? Assessment of Trait and Situational Predictors
Zdravko Marjanovic, C. Ward Struthers and Esther R. Greenglass

Is Cognitive Empathy More Important than Affective Empathy? A Response to “Who Helps Natural-Disaster Victims?”
Christopher J. Einolf

Helping Natural Disaster Victims Depends on Characteristics and Perceptions of Victims. A Response to “Who Helps Natural Disaster Victims?”
Jessica L. McManus and Donald A. Saucier

The Role of Empathy in Responding to Natural Disasters: Comment on “Who Helps Natural Disaster Victims?”
Jillian C. Banfield and John F. Dovidio

Responsibility, Intent, and Donor Behavior: Commentary on Who Helps Natural-Disaster Victims? Assessment of Trait and Situational Predictors
Jesse Chandler

Who is Responsible and What are They Responsible For? Contextual Features Matter in Judgments of Responsibility and Helping
G. Scott Morgan

Big-Picture Issues: Research on Helping Behavior and Victims of Natural Disasters
Zdravko Marjanovic, C. Ward Struthers and Esther R. Greenglass

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Social Psychology and Contemporary Immigration Policy

Published: November 2011

Human migration brings with it social challenges. In the United States in the early 21st Century, these challenges appear magnified by an atmosphere of economic distress and political opportunism. The present virtual issue on Social Psychology and Contemporary Immigration Policy examines some of the human costs of immigration policy, as borne by individuals, families, social institutions, and communities.

The collection is organized in six sections. The first four include original scholarship on Challenges for law enforcement, Group relations and social justice, Effects of policy upon individuals and communities, and Media effects. These are followed by distinguished commentary. Finally, the virtual issue provides direct links to other recent SPSSI publications on immigration.

Introduction

Social Psychology and Contemporary Immigration Policy: An Introduction
Kevin Lanning

Challenges for law enforcement

Can Racial Profiling be Avoided Under Arizona Immigration Law? Lessons Learned from Subtle Bias Research and Anti-Discrimination Law
Jason A. Nier, Samuel L. Gaertner, Charles L. Nier and John F. Dovidio

A Model of Authoritarianism, Social Norms, and Personal Values: Implications for Arizona Law Enforcement and Immigration Policy
Emily L. Fisher, Grace Deason, Eugene Borgida and Clifton M. Oyamot Jr.

Safety or Liberty?: The Bogus Trade-Off of Cross-Deputization Policy
Liana Maris Epstein and Phillip Atiba Goff

Group relations and social justice

National Identity and Immigration Policy: Concern for Legality or Ethnocentric Exclusion?
Sahana Mukherjee, Ludwin E. Molina and Glenn Adams

Economic Dynamics and Changes in Attitudes Toward Undocumented Mexican Immigrants in Arizona
Priscila Diaz, Delia S. Saenz and Virginia S.Y. Kwan

Improving Relationships Between Residents and Immigrants
Walter G. Stephan

Effects on individuals

Perpetual Illegality: Results of Border Enforcement and Policies for Mexican Undocumented Migrants in the United States
Heidy Sarabia

Immigration Reform and the Potential for Psychosocial Trauma: The Missing Link of Lived Human Experience
Lisa Lopez Levers and Debra Hyatt-Burkhart

Lowell Immigrant Communities in the Climate of Deportations
Jana Sládková, Sandra M. García Mangado and Johana Reyes Quinteros

Media effects

How the Media Frames the Immigration Debate: The Critical Role of Location and Politics
Stephanie A. Fryberg, Nicole M. Stephens, Rebecca Covarrubias, Hazel Rose Markus, Erin D. Carter, Giselle A. Laiduc and Ana J. Salido

The Devil Knows Best: Experimental Effects of a Televised Soap Opera on Latino Attitudes Toward Government and Support for the 2010 U.S. Census
Matthew D. Trujillo and Elizabeth Levy Paluck

Commentary

Another View from the Ground: How Laws Like SB1070 and HB2281 Erode the Intergroup Fabric of Our Community
Meghan G. Bean and Jeff Stone

Economic Costs, Economic Benefits, and Attitudes Toward Immigrants and Immigration
Victoria M. Esses, Paula M. Brochu and Karen R. Dickson

The Deliberative Poll as a Method for Generating Informed Opinion on Immigration
Pamela Fiber-Ostrow and Sarah A. Hill

Adopting a Target Perspective in Undocumented Immigrants Research
I-Ching Lee

The Importance of Considering Undocumented Immigration from Multiple Perspectives in the Context of Social Justice
Charles Negy

Future Directions in Research Regarding Attitudes Toward Immigrants
Michael A. Zárate and Stephanie A. Quezada

Other relevant SPSSI publications

Journal of Social Issues, Vol. 66 Issue 1
Latinos and Latino Immigrants in the United States
Juan F. Casas and Carey S. Ryan

Journal of Social Issues, Vol. 66 Issue 4
Immigrants and Hosts: Perceptions, Interactions, and Transformations
Victoria M. Esses, Kay Deaux, Richard N. Lalonde and Rupert Brown

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Military Social Influence

Published: June 2011

Introduction: The study of social influence has long played a significant role in shaping public opinion, foreign as well as domestic, and in times of peace as well as war. In the first years of the 21st Century, that role may well be increasing in importance. Consequently, it could be argued that social psychologists, particularly those in the United States, have a responsibility to familiarize themselves with the use of social influence in the military. Yet there remains little to no discussion of military social influence in contemporary civilian texts and journals. This omission may be grounded in ambivalence, particularly in the wake of the so-called enhanced interrogation techniques used at Guantanamo Bay (Costanzo, Gerrity & Lykes, 2007, this journal). Beyond this, many social scientists believe that while it may be humane to replace the lethal tools of war with the gentler ones of influence, it is also potentially Orwellian. And yet the use of social psychology in the military goes on. A US Army General predicted that social scientists will be as important in the wars of the future as physicists have in the wars of the past - and this was before the social network facilitated popular uprisings of the Arab Spring of 2010-2011. The present virtual issue provides an introduction to both the nature of military social influence and some of the ethical issues which frame it. The collection includes a target article by Dr. Sara King, seven comments and an author's rebuttal; the comments are noteworthy not merely in the breadth of the concerns they raise but also in the diversity of their geographical origins, with contributors from Australia, Canada, Great Britain, and Taiwan, as well as the United States. Taken together, this provides a global perspective on military social psychology that is unique, is thought-provoking, and that will be of interest to a wide range of students, scholars, and analysts

Military Social Influence in the Global Information Environment: A Civilian Primer
Sara B. King

Roots, Shoots, and Fruits of Persuasion in Military Affairs
Robert B. Cialdini

Commentary on the article by Sara King (2010), Military Social Influence in the Global Information Environment: A Civilian Primer
Mandeep K. Dhami

Influence Scholarship and Ethics: Commentary on the article by Sara King (2010), Military Social Influence in the Global Information Environment: A Civilian Primer
Stephan Lewandowsky and Werner G. K. Stritzke

Military Social Influence Commentary on the article by Sara King (2010), Military Social Influence in the Global Information Environment: A Civilian Primer
David R. Mandel

Muslim World Outreach: The United States Intervenes in Religious Identity: Commentary on the article by Sara King (2010), Military Social Influence in the Global Environment: A Civilian Primer
Clark McCauley

Should Social Scientists Aid the U.S. Government in Information Campaigns? : Commentary on the article by Sara King (2010), Military Social Influence in the Global Information Environment: A Civilian Primer
Sophia Moskalenko

Can Social Scientists Promote the Effects of Social Influence During War? An Effect Size Perspective: Commentary on the article by Sara King (2010), Military Social Influence in the Global Information Environment: A Civilian Primer
Chih-Long Yen

Author Response to: Military Social Influence in the Global Environment
Sara B. King

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The Social Psychology of the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election

Published: October 2010

Introduction: Elections may be understood not just in terms of their political consequences, but also as large and systematic samples of behavior that reflect on the people of a particular time and place. In the American Presidential election of 2008, this fusion of the political with the psychological took on a particular significance, as the election was contested by women as well as men, and won for the first time by a person of color, Barack Obama. The present collection of seventeen papers examines a number of facets of the social and political psychology of the election, and includes analyses of the continuing significance of race and racism, of sex and sexism, and of cognitive processes in an America divided into Red and Blue. The papers also investigate the roles of emotions such as hope, fear, and existential anxiety, and, finally, some of the ways in which winning, losing, and simply voting can bolster, injure, and inform the self-concept. Taken together, these papers provide a deeper understanding of the American electorate than that afforded by exit polls and news surveys, and illuminate the psychological as well as the political significance of the 2008 Presidential Election.

The Social Psychology of the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election
Kevin Lanning and Geoffrey Maruyama

The Political Psychology of Personal Narrative: The Case of Barack Obama
Phillip L. Hammack

Black and White, or Shades of Gray? Racial Labeling of Barack Obama Predicts Implicit Race Perception
Lori Wu Malahy, Mara Sedlins, Jason Plaks and Yuichi Shoda

Race and Gender in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election: A Content Analysis of Editorial Cartoons
Eileen L. Zurbriggen and Aurora M. Sherman

Seeing Red (and Blue): Effects of Electoral College Depictions on Political Group Perception
Abraham M. Rutchick, Joshua M. Smyth and Sara Konrath

Same-Race and Same-Gender Voting Preferences and the Role of Perceived Realistic Threat in the Democratic Primaries and Caucuses 2008
Robert Böhm, Friedrich Funke and Nicole S. Harth

Racism, Sexism, and Candidate Evaluations in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election
Caitlin E. Dwyer, Daniel Stevens, John L. Sullivan and Barbara Allen

Implicit Race Attitudes Predicted Vote in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election
Anthony G. Greenwald, Colin Tucker Smith, N. Sriram, Yoav Bar-Anan and Brian A. Nosek

Voter Affect and the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election: Hope and Race Mattered
Christopher Finn and Jack Glaser

Yes We Did! Basking in Reflected Glory and Cutting Off Reflected Failure in the 2008 Presidential Election
Chris B. Miller

Rejected by the Nation: The Electoral Defeat of Candidates Included in the Self Is Experienced as Personal Rejection
Steven G. Young, Michael J. Bernstein and Heather M. Claypool

Seeing the Other Side: Reducing Political Partisanship via Self-Affirmation in the 2008 Presidential Election
Kevin R. Binning, David K. Sherman, Geoffrey L. Cohen and Kirsten Heitland

Compassionate Values and Presidential Politics: Mortality Salience, Compassionate Values, and Support for Barack Obama and John McCain in the 2008 Presidential Election
Kenneth E. Vail III, Jamie Arndt, Matt Motyl and Tom Pyszczynski

Beyond Identity Politics: Moral Psychology and the 2008 Democratic Primary
Ravi Iyer, Jesse Graham, Spassena Koleva, Peter Ditto and Jonathan Haidt

Moral and Religious Convictions and Intentions to Vote in the 2008 Presidential Election
G. Scott Morgan, Linda J. Skitka and Daniel C. Wisneski

Efficacy and Estrangement: Effects of Voting
Justin D. Hackett and Allen M. Omoto

Elevating Norm Over Substance: Self-Monitoring as a Predictor of Decision Criteria and Decision Time among Independent Voters
Erik J. Girvan, Jason Weaver and Mark Snyder


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