Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

Cover image for Vol. 64 Issue 7

Edited By: William B. Applegate

Impact Factor: 3.842

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 2/32 (Gerontology); 8/49 (Geriatrics & Gerontology)

Online ISSN: 1532-5415



Author Guidelines


Author Guidelines

The primary goal of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) is to publish articles that are relevant in the broadest terms to the clinical care of older persons. The Journal only considers studies involving human participants. Such articles may span a variety of disciplines and fields and may be of immediate, intermediate, or long-term potential benefit to clinical practice. In the review process, equal weight will be placed on innovation and quality of the study design or review methodology. All inquiries about the Journal should be addressed to the:

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Editorial Office
Emily Hammond, Managing Editor
Sara Tinsley, Editorial Assistant
Mail: 205 Shannon Oaks Circle, Suite 124, Cary, NC 27511
Phone: (919) 650-1459 ext-211
E-mail:
jags@jjeditorial.com.

AUTHORSHIP AND DUPLICATE PUBLICATIONS
The Journal adheres to the Uniform Requirements for manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals established by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE; www.icmje.org), and authors should adhere to these requirements. The principles of this document, including those related to overlapping (duplicate) publication, authorship, and disclosure of potential conflict of interest, apply equally to manuscripts for consideration in this Journal or in a separate supplement. 

All authors should meet the ICJME criteria for authorship. In particular, for byline authors, authorship credit should be based on 1) substantial contributions to conception and design, or acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; 2) drafting the article or revising it critically for important intellectual content; and 3) final approval of the version to be published. Authors should meet conditions 1, 2, and 3. All persons designated as authors must qualify for authorship, and all those who qualify should be listed. The letter accompanying the manuscript should include the statement, “All authors meet the criteria for authorship stated in the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals.” Within the Acknowledgment section and under the subheading “Author's Contributions,” all authors’ specific areas of contributions should be listed. In addition, any writer or editor assisting the authors but who does not fulfill all criteria for authorship should be acknowledged in the manuscript, including a description of their role in the paper, affiliation(s), and source(s) of support. This journal does not allow ghostwriting, where un-named contributors have played a role in manuscript preparation. 

Manuscripts purporting to contain original material will be considered for publication with the understanding that neither the article nor any of its essentials, including tables and figures, has been or will be published or submitted for publication elsewhere before appearing in this Journal. When submitting a paper, the author(s) should always make a full statement to the editor in chief in the cover letter section about the following:

-All submissions and previous reports that might be regarded as redundant, duplicate or overlapping significantly with the presently submitted paper to JAGS.

-If the current (JAGS) research includes subjects about which a previous report has been published. Such research should be referred to and referenced in the JAGS paper.

Details on what constitutes duplicate papers, why duplicate publications arise, and what steps might be taken with duplicate publications can be found here:
http://www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/publishing-and-editorial-issues/overlapping-publications.html This rule does not apply to abstracts or press reports published as a result of a scientific meeting.

Plagiarism is forbidden. Authors should be aware that the Journal uses anti-plagiarism software (iThenticate) to screen all manuscripts for plagiarism.

WEBSITE SUBMISSION
Manuscripts must be submitted via the JAGS website at:
https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jags. Step-by-step instructions for formatting and uploading manuscripts are available on the opening screen of the site. When preparing for submission, follow the following formatting instructions: Upload the file as a Word document with 12-point font, argins at 1" from edge, page numbers, and continuous line numbering. Also, double-space all elements of the paper including abstract, text, references, and legends.

TITLE PAGE
The title page should include the following:
      -The title and a short running title (45 characters, maximum) for the manuscript.
      -All author names (first name, middle initial(s), last name), with highest academic degree(s) (no professional organizations, membership into society, or certification, e.g., FACP, FRCP, etc., except for AGSF).
      -All relevant institutional and corporate affiliations of each author. Use footnotes (Arabic numerals) to indicate each author's affiliation(s) in a numbered list.
      -All funding sources (grants or institutional or corporate support) and the meeting, if any, at which the paper was submitted.
      -The name, address, telephone number, fax number, and e-mail address of the corresponding author.
      -Word counts are required for the Abstract, if applicable, the main text (excluding Abstract and Acknowledgments), and the number of tables/figures.

ABSTRACT
JAGS requires that abstracts of manuscripts submitted for the Clinical Investigations, Brief Reports, and Brief Methodological Reports sections be in a structured form conforming to guidelines published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (1998;280:23–24) and Annals of Internal Medicine (1990;113:69–76). Abstracts should include the following headings: Background/Objectives, Design, Setting, Participants, Intervention (if any), Measurements, Results, and Conclusion. Specify the sample size. Emphasize clinical relevance in the abstract’s conclusion. Abstract should be limited to 275 words or less for these 3 sections.  Full papers submitted to other sections (e.g., Nursing, Geriatric Bioscience, Education and Training, etc.) require a simple narrative abstract of 250 words or less summarizing the content of the paper. For specific length and formatting requirements, please consult the Submission Type table provided below.

KEY WORDS
Authors should include 3 to 5 key words at the end of the abstract for all papers except Editorials, Old Lives Tales, Clinical Trials and Tribulations, and Letters to the Editor.  

TEXT
All clinical studies should include the following headings: INTRODUCTION, METHODS, RESULTS, DISCUSSION, ACKNOWLEDGMENTS, REFERENCES, and GRAPHICS (tables, figures or appendices) in that order. Start each of these sections on a new page. Statistical methodology should be part of the METHODS section. Do not use “NS” for nonsignificant values. Provide nonsignificant and significant P-values to no more than three places past the decimal. Use P <.001 for all P values less than .001.  For percentages use no more than one place past the decimal. In referring to cases with 50 or fewer subjects, state number (“one of four” cases), rather than percentages (25%). For instruments or scales, indicate normal range in the table (footnote) or figure as well as in the text if reference is made to these in this section.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The corresponding author must affirm that he or she has listed everyone who contributed significantly (see section on “Authorship and Duplicate Publication”) to the work and has obtained written consent from all contributors who are not authors and are named in the Acknowledgment section. The Acknowledgment section should clearly list three sections: Conflict of Interest, Author Contributions, and Sponsor's Role as described below.  It is ultimately the corresponding author’s responsibility to notify all coauthors that the manuscript has been submitted to JAGS, of all changes in the revised versions, and the final decision of the Editor in chief of JAGS on the paper, as well as assuring the correct spelling of all authors, order of authorship, and author affiliations.

Conflict of Interest: The issue of conflict of interest (COI) is of great importance to JAGS in order to maintain integrity, accuracy and objectivity in material submitted for publication. There must be adequate and full discourse of potential conflicts. To facilitate this process, the following definitions should be helpful:

  1. Financial conflicts: employment or affiliation, grants or funding, honoraria, speaker forum membership, consultant, stock ownership or options (excluding mutual funds), royalties, expert testimony, advisory board, or patents (pending, filed, or received) as they relate to the sponsoring agent, products, technology and/or methodologies involved in the papers submitted for publication. Medical education companies that are not owned or operated by the sponsoring agent or company associated with the product, technology or methodology described in the submitted paper(s) and serve to organize and prepare manuscripts for submission are generally not considered a potential conflict.
  2. Personal conflicts: a close family or personal relationship with owners or employees of the sponsoring agent or company associated with product, technology or methodology described in the submitted paper.
  3. Full or adequate disclosure: each author addresses each of the specific categories of financial and personal conflicts.
  4. Potential conflict: any circumstance or competing interest that could be construed or perceived as influencing the interpretation of the results. The time period for applying the criteria for COI is 3 years prior to the time the manuscript is submitted (submission date) to the Journal.
The Journal will require that each author provide information on each of the elements of financial and personal conflicts in the manuscript file. If no conflicts were apparent, authors should indicate: "The authors have no conflicts in the cover letter as well as in the manuscript, as noted above.

Authors are also encouraged to discolse potential conflicts in the cover letter as well as in the manuscript, as noted above.

Author Contributions: Indicate authors' role in study concept and design, acquisition of subjects and/or data, analysis and interpretation of data, and preparation of manuscript. (See section on 'Authorship and Duplicate Publication")

Sponsor's Role: Indicate sponsor's role in the design, methods, subject recruitment, data collections, analysis and preparation of paper.

REFERENCE
S
Authors are responsible for the accuracy and completeness of all References. Number all references in the sequence in which they first appear in the text and use the style indicated in the “Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals.” Abbreviate the title of the journal as done in the Index Medicus or PubMed. Do not italicize or add periods to the names of the journals. Include only references that are accessible to all readers. For source material obtained online, indicate author, title, website address and date accessed. Abstracts are not acceptable as references unless they have been published in established sources within the preceding 4 years. Cite only the names of the first three authors followed by “et al.” and do not place periods after initials of first and middle names or commas between surnames and first names. Include both the first and last pages of all references. Manuscripts accepted for publication may be referenced with page numbers indicated as 000–000. Do not cite by number or list as a reference personal communications or manuscripts in preparation or submitted for publication. Such material and attribution may be included in the text, if necessary. References to software programs should also be included in the text (“Analyses were performed using SAS, version 6.0 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC)”).

Examples of appropriate reference style:

Journal

  1. Mulrow CD, Aguilar C, Endicott JE et al. Quality-of-life changes and hearing impairment: A randomized trial. Ann Intern Med 1990;113:188–194. (NOTE: List only first 3 authors’ names and then “et al.”).

Book Chapter

  1. Davidson JM. Sexuality and aging. In: Hazzard WR, Andrew R, Bierman EL et al., eds. Principles of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, 2nd Ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1990, pp 108–118.

Book

  1. Kane RL, Ouslander JG, Abrass IB. Essentials of Clinical Geriatrics, 2nd Ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1990.

Online

  1. ACR Fact Sheet. Osteoarthritis 2000. American College of Rheumatology (online).  Available at: www.rheumatology.org/patients/factsheets/oa/html. Accessed August 23, 2002.

 

TABLES
Tables (as well as Figures and Appendices) should appear after the References section and not in the body of the text or as a separate document. Number all tables with Arabic numbers consecutively in order of appearance. Type each table double-spaced on a separate page. Title should have the first letter of each word as upper case (except prepositions, conjunctions and articles). Every table must have a caption typed above the tabular material. Symbols for units should be used only in column headings. Every column must have a description or heading. Do not use internal horizontal or vertical lines; place horizontal lines between table caption and column headings, under column headings, and at the bottom of the table (above the footnotes, if any). Do not submit tables as photographs. Indicate normal range for instruments or scales. All abbreviations used in tables must be spelled out as footnotes.  

FIGURES
Figures should appear after the References section and either before or after tables, but not as a separate document. Legends for figures should be presented in numerical order on a separate page(s), not on or below the figure. All abbreviations must be spelled out on the figure legend. Indicate normal range for instruments or scales. Original artwork or figures may be requested upon acceptance of the manuscript for publication and will not be returned. Figures should be in black and white. The cost of publishing illustrations in color must be borne by the author at a rate of $1,500 per figure for the print journal. There is no charge to publish color figures in the online version only.  

There are three preferred formats for digital artwork submission: Encapsulated PostScript (EPS), Portable Document Format (PDF), and Tagged Image File Format (TIFF). We suggest that line art be saved as EPS files. Alternatively, these may be saved as PDF files at 600 dots per inch (dpi) or better at final size. Tone art, or photographic images, should be saved as TIFF files with a resolution of 300 dpi at final size. For combination figures, or artwork that contains both photographs and labeling, we recommend saving figures as EPS files, or as PDF files with a resolution of 600 dpi or better at final size. More detailed information on the submission of electronic artwork can be found at http://media.wiley.com/assets/7323/92/electronic_artwork_guidelines.pdf

JOURNAL STYLE

Unit of Measurement:Although JAGS accepts the use of conventional units of le Système International d’Unités (SI), we do prefer units of measurements most familiar to those working in the United States (e.g., mg/deciliter, cells/microliter instead of mg/liter, cells/liter).

Abbreviations: Abbreviations are acceptable provided they are commonly used or well recognized, but the use of many abbreviations in a single manuscript is discouraged. Abbreviations should be given only if the term is used more than one time. Terms must also be spelled out and followed by the abbreviation in parentheses when first used in the abstract and text. Terms must also be spelled out in tables and figures, with abbreviations provided in parentheses immediately following first use of the term or as footnotes. Abbreviations of units of measurement are not discouraged, but units of time should not be abbreviated except in virgule construction (e.g., 40 mg/d).

Drug Names: Generic names should be used whenever possible. Brand names may be included in parentheses after a generic name the first time it is used.

Footnotes: Footnotes should only be used on the title page (for author affiliations) and in tables and figures (for explanatory or clarification remarks). Please use lower case English alphabet starting with a, b, c, etc., in superscript format. Do not use footnotes in the main running text of the manuscript file. Parenthetical statements are more appropriate than footnotes in the text and should be placed in the text within parentheses.

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

Authors are encouraged to use supplemental material if necessary. Editors and reviewers may ask that primary tables/figures and even some text be moved to supplemental information for space purposes. Authors must include a descriptive title for each individually uploaded supplemental file at the end of the manuscript file. This should not include legends, footnotes, or abbreviations, all of which should be contained within the supplemental file. Cite each file in the main running text. Supplemental files will be available to readers as direct downloads and not included in the print version (though the legends will be listed there). Note that these files will NOT be copyedited or typeset, but published as uploaded. Authors will have a chance to perform a final review of these files after acceptance.

Supplemental files should be titled as Supplemental Table 1, Supplemental Figure 1, Supplemental Text 1, Supplemental Dataset 1, etc.

CATEGORIES OF ARTICLES

To maximize the number of pages that can be published and yet maintain high quality, there are strict limits on the total number of a) text words, b) graphics (tables and figures), and c) references. Authors should carefully read the formatting guidelines below and ensure that their work adheres to the limits of the chosen submission type (including the length and format of the Abstract and main text, as well as the number of graphics and references). Categories of JAGS submissions are listed below:

Section

Abstract

Text words

References

Graphics

(appendix, table, figure)

Clinical Investigations

Structured; 275

3,500

50

5

Brief Reports

Structured; 275

2,500

30

3

Brief Methodological Reports

Structured; 275

2,500

30

3

Clinical Management of the Geriatric Patient

Narrative; 250

5,000

50

5

Geriatric Bioscience

Narrative; 250

3,000

30

3

Ethics, Public Policy, and Medical Economics

Narrative; 250

3,000

30

3

Nursing

Narrative; 250

3,000

30

3

Education and Training

Narrative; 250

3,000

30

3

Dental and Oral Health

Narrative; 250

3,000

30

3

Aging and Surgery

Narrative; 250

3,000

30

3

Drugs and Pharmacology

Narrative; 250

3,000

30

3

Ethnogeriatrics and Special Populations

Narrative; 250

3,000

30

3

International Health Affairs

Narrative; 250

3,000

30

3

Models of Geriatric Care, Quality Improvement, and Program Dissemination

Narrative; 250

4,000

50

5

Perspectives of Geriatrics by Pioneers

None

3,000

30

3

Controversies in Geriatrics and Gerontology

None

1,500

10

2

Palliative Care and Geriatrics

Structured/Narrative; 250

3,000

30

3

Geriatric Emergency Medicine

Structured/Narrative; 250

3,000

30

3

Special Articles

Narrative

3,000

30

3

Editorials

None

1,500

20

2

Old Lives Tales

None

750

10

1

Clinical Trials and Tribulations

None

750

10

1

Letters to the Editor

(Research, Case Report, or Comments / Responses)

None

750

10

1

Clinical Investigations
These are reports of investigator-initiated research that presents new information. Information that is already available in textbooks or as common knowledge will not be considered for review. The subject matter can be very broad as long as it is relevant to aging conditions in humans.  

To improve the quality of reporting randomized, controlled trials (RCTs), it is recommended that authors adhere to the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) statement, which consists of a checklist and flow diagram that authors can use to report RCTs. Authors should refer to the paper, Altman DG, Schulz KF, Moher D et al. The revised CONSORT statement for reporting randomized trials: Explanation and elaboration. Annals of Internal Medicine 2001; 134:663-694.  

Brief Reports
These are clinical-investigation or clinical-experience reports whose findings are somewhat preliminary or a clinical study reporting on narrowly focused or limited findings.  

Brief Methodological Reports
These are reports on the use of a variety of self-reported, administered, or performance-based measures and scales that assess physical, functional, mood, cognitive, and social domains; the utility of a new method or approach to investigate a clinical or health problem in older people; or an innovative model or design to research issues related to healthcare delivery and service.  

Clinical Management of the Geriatric Patient
These papers are clinically oriented reviews with a focus on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of clinical problems occurring in older adults.  The review should include a brief discussion on epidemiology and current concepts on pathogenesis as it applies to aging, with a major focus on how aging impacts clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, therapeutic intervention and prevention measures.  

Geriatric Bioscience
Geriatric Bioscience articles are reviews of pathophysiology, pathogenesis or basic scientific information relevant to a geriatric condition or problem. The paper should be written in a style, format and language understandable to our readers, who are predominantly clinicians and not basic scientists. This section should not focus on animal studies. 

Ethics, Public Policy, and Medical Economics
These papers are concerned with ethical issues and economic, political, environmental, or other issues of public policy that are particularly relevant to the practice of geriatric medicine. The editors will solicit papers on public policy issues, but spontaneous submissions are also encouraged.  

Nursing
Papers focusing on issues related to nursing research, care, training, education, policies, etc., will be published in this section.  However, research papers on nursing will generally be published in other sections. 

Dental and Oral Health
This section is intended to address dental care, oral health and oral disease as they impact the geriatric population. With a focus on geriatric dental and oral health issues, papers can address such areas as original research, program development, dental care in non-traditional settings, workforce issues and reviews of topics that would add new knowledge or recommendations for care. 

Aging and Surgery
This section is seeking papers of high quality research from leaders within the surgical community focusing on geriatric care, including outcomes of surgical procedures with respect to age and in comparison to younger counterparts. Papers focusing on issues of education/training, healthcare delivery and models, and policy focusing on geriatric surgery are also welcomed. 

Education and Training
This section includes papers on models of education and training, research in education, policies related to geriatric training and education, and other issues relevant to teaching. 

Drugs and Pharmacology
Reviews on specific drugs or class of drugs, pharmacology, drug prescribing, and related topics as they apply to older adults, as well as current information on drugs from the Food and Drug Administration, and pharmaceutical companies, will be published in this section.  We discourage papers that appear to be a marketing forum for a specific drug or agent. 

Ethnogeriatrics and Special Populations
Papers that focus on issues related to health, disease, disability, healthcare delivery, education, training, research, policies and ethics that are especially unique or relevant to minority and ethnic groups or special populations (e.g., older victims or crime, older prisoners) will generally be published in this section. However, papers involving these groups and special populations may also be published in other sections of JAGS depending on the emphasis and general applicability of the information. 

International Health Affairs
Current topics on geriatrics and related issues in countries outside the United States will be published in this section. Papers for this section should be focused on models and systems of healthcare delivery for older adults for countries or the country in question. Also, manuscripts on education/training, economics, politics, policies, and ethics–all related to aging - are also welcomed. In the case of specific country profiles, authors may find it helpful to view the outline and the standard table of country profile in JAGS 2000;48:980-984. Clinical research papers should be submitted in other appropriate sections of the Journal. 

Models of Geriatric Care, Quality Improvement, and Program Dissemination
This section offers the opportunity to disseminate information on effective model programs or services. Descriptive information on the ‘‘who, what, and how’’ of innovative programs with evidence relevant to effectiveness and potential for replication by others is sought. Pure feasibility studies are not appropriate for this section. Review criteria include: (1) Innovation: does this model add substantially to existing models of geriatric care? (2) Model Description: is the model described in sufficient detail to understand what was done? (3) Effectiveness: is there evidence of effectiveness of the model for clinical outcomes? Randomized clinical trials are welcome but not required. (4) Evidence of feasible implementation and/or dissemination to other settings. Our goal is to offer a venue for the timely sharing of innovative and effective approaches to important clinical problems in the care of older patients. 

Perspective of Geriatrics by Pioneers in Aging (PGPA)
This section is by invitation only by the editor in chief and executive editor of JAGS. We will invite internationally and nationally recognized leaders and pioneers in aging to provide their insights and views of the current field of geriatrics and what direction(s) the field should go to better meet the health needs and improve the quality of life of older adults. the intent here is to allow current and younger geriatricians to gain "lessons learned" from these pioneers in how to be successful in the field of geriatrics, as well as obtain broad framework of future tasks that should be addressed for health care of older people. 

Controversies in Geriatrics and Gerontology
For this section, a different format will be implemented.  We seek to discuss a topic/issue in geriatrics and gerontology (as well as long-term care) that involve two experts with opposing views on the subject matter.  An example might be, “Should we aggressively treat systolic hypertension in the very old?”  Each invited expert will submit his/her perspective (1,500 text words/10 references/2 graphics for each expert); as well as a rebuttal to the opposing viewpoint (500 text words/5 references/1 graphic).  The assigned associate editor will write a brief (250 words or less) narrative abstract to introduce the topic/issue.

Palliative Care and Geriatrics (PCG)
This section accepts papers in which the topic or issue of palliative care (and/or hospice) intersects with geriatrics. The focus may be a research study, education, clinical care, health policy, etc.

Geriatric Emergency Medicine (GEM)
Topics focusing on clinical care, education, research and administration in the geriatric patient in the Emergency Department or Emergency Room are appropriate for this section.

Special Articles
This section includes papers on history; recommendations for preventive strategies in geriatrics; reports of meetings, task force, or committee activities; guidelines and position statements by the American Geriatrics Society; and other topics relevant to aging but not conforming to any of the Journal’s existing sections. 

Editorials
Editorials are invited comments on a specific paper published in the Journal. Occasionally, opinions or commentary by qualified and respected individuals on a highly relevant topic or controversial issue pertinent to aging will be published in this section at the discretion of the editor in chief.

Literature and Aging
These are invited submissions on narrative articles looking at the human side of the interaction between aging, disease, and health care.

Old Lives Tales
We invite readers to submit stories, experiences, or incidences which have instructed, saddened or gladdened us as physicians and, above all, taught us something about the care of the older adult. When describing a particular patient, permission should be received in writing from him/her (mailed with the manuscript and diskette) or the personal details changed enough to conceal the person’s identity. 

Letters to the Editor(three categories: Case Reports, Research Studies, and Comments/Responses)
Letters to the Editor should be brief. One type of letter is an objective, constructive, and educational critique of a previously published article in JAGS (Comments/Responses); these should be submitted within 3 months after publication of the original paper. The editorial office may submit letters critiquing a paper published in JAGS to the authors of the paper, who will be given 1 month to reply to the critique. The letter and the reply will usually be published in tandem. Other letters may discuss matters of general interest to physicians involved in the care of older patients, interesting clinical or research findings, or brief commentary on any aspect of aging as it relates to humans. Case reports and preliminary research findings may also be appropriate for this section. Generally, we do not publish letters critiquing papers published in other journals. 

Supplements
The Journal invites a collection of papers to be published as a Supplement. The supplement proposal should be based on symposia or other presentations at national scientific meetings devoted to aging or from projects or initiative with the potential for a national impact on the health care and quality of life of older adults. The following are criteria or requirements for a supplement publication.

1.      Articles contained in the supplement must meet the same peer review criteria that are applied to regular issues of the Journal.

2.      Proposals for supplements that focus on one therapeutic diagnostic agent, product, or strategy to the exclusion or minimization of other options will not be considered.

3.      Proposed supplements must have an identified source of support for publishing costs.

4.      Authors must provide a statement that the content of the paper represents their work/opinion, and not that of the sponsoring agents, and they verify the accuracy of the content.

5.      The editor in chief of the Journal, in consultation with the editorial board, is responsible for reviewing and accepting proposals for supplements. In addition, sponsoring agents for the supplement will not be permitted to alter or edit any parts of the manuscript without written permission from the editor in chief.

6.      The editor in chief reserves the right to reject one or more papers or the entire supplement if it fails to meet our standards.

MANUSCRIPT PROCESSING

All manuscripts will be initially reviewed by the editor in chief. If further review is deemed appropriate, the paper will be assigned to a deputy editor or possibly an associate or section editor. If the paper is judged to be suitable for review, it will be sent to two or more external referees (reviewers) or, in rare instances, it will receive revision comments directly from the editors.

Authors will be required to provide the names of at least two potential referees who could serve as qualified reviewers of the work, but the editor(s) will make the final choice. Authors will be given 60 days to complete major revisions and 30 days for minor revisions. Extensions can be considered upon request. Do not submit a revision as a new submission.

The guidelines for publication conform to those of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors “Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals.” The complete document appears in the Annals of Internal Medicine (1997;126:36–47) and the New England Journal of Medicine (1997;336:309–315). An explication of statistical guidelines is presented in John C. Bailar III and Frederick Mostellor, “Guidelines for Statistical Reporting in Articles for Medical Journals,” Annals of Internal Medicine (1998;108:266–273), as well as American Medical Association, “AMA Manual of Style. A Guide for Authors and Editors”. 10th edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 2007.

The research reported in submitted manuscripts must comply with the ethical rules for human experimentation that are stated in the Declaration of Helsinki (JAMA 1997;277:925–926), including approval of an institutional review board – or human experimentation committee – and informed consent. Authors must disclose this compliance in the Methods section of the manuscript.

TRANSFER OF COPYRIGHT AND AUTHOR PARTICIPATION AGREEMENT

If your paper is accepted, the author identified as the formal corresponding author for the paper will receive an email prompting them to log into Author Services where, via the Wiley Author Licensing Service (WALS), they will be able to complete the license agreement on behalf of all authors on the paper.
If the OnlineOpen option is not selected, the corresponding author will be presented with the copyright transter agreement (CTA) to sign. The terms and conditions of the CTA can be previewed in the samples associated with the copyright FAQs:
http://authorservices.wiley.com/bauthor/faqs_copyright.asp

EARLY VIEW
This feature will allow us to publish articles online in advance of print approximately 8 weeks after the manuscript is received by the Publisher. Articles will be copyedited, typeset, and posted in their final form, with all author and editor in chief corrections incorporated. Volume and page numbers will not be added until after the article is assigned to an issue, but articles will be fully citable using the DOI (digital object identifier) number provided with the article. To ensure that your article is posted as quickly as possible, please return your corrected proofs to the proofreader within 48 hours of receipt.

EMBARGO POLICY
The Journal proposes two embargo dates – the EarlyView publication and the hard-copy publication date. The EarlyView embargo date will vary from issue to issue according to the dates the papers have been posted on the Journal’s website with their unique citable DOI number. This date will also be considered as the embargo date for that particular article. Authors can access the EarlyView papers by logging on to:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1532-5415/earlyview.
For printed issue, press releases will be sent out to reporters on the last day of the preceding month, with an embargo date of the 9th of the month printed at the top. Authors must contact the JAGS editorial office before they do a press release.

PERMISSIONS / REPRINT REQUESTS
Use or reproduction of materials from other sources (e.g., journal, book) must be accompanied by a statement or document from both author and publisher giving permission to JAGS for reproduction.

Requests for permission to republish material previously printed in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society in another journal should be directed to PermissionsUS@wiley.com.

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