Academic Emergency Medicine

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 11

Edited By: Jeffrey A. Kline, MD

Online ISSN: 1553-2712

Associated Title(s): AEM Education and Training

Peer-reviewed Lectures (PeRLS)


Ethical Decision-Making in the ED Lecture

Ethical decision-making is difficult in any health care setting, but it can be particularly challenging in the fast-paced, high-acuity emergency department (ED). Emergency physicians must be skilled at helping patients, families, and colleagues work through complex ethical issues.

This video can be viewed in its entirety online when you click the video above or click here.

Gender-specific Emergency Medicine Research: Overview and Opportunities

In this brief 30-minute video presentation, we review the effect that sex- and gender-specific research has had on the field of emergency medicine (EM) and present concrete examples of current EM literature that methodically study how sex and gender affect patient presentation, management, and outcomes for acute conditions common to our specialty.

This video can be viewed in its entirety online when you click the video above or click here.

Gender-specific Emergency Care: Part One

Current research indicates that there are significant physiologic differences between men and women that may have important clinical implications in the emergency care of patients. This is a two-part video presentation that reviews eight clinical topics applying the “gender lens” as it relates to the practice of emergency medicine (EM). Part 1 reviews the following topics: cardiovascular, neurology, sports medicine, and pain. Part 2 includes substance abuse, trauma, pulmonary, and toxicology.

This video can be viewed in its entirety online when you click the video above or click here.

Gender-specific Emergency Care: Part Two

Current research indicates that there are significant physiologic differences between men and women that may have important clinical implications in the emergency care of patients. This is a two-part video presentation that reviews eight clinical topics applying the “gender lens” as it relates to the practice of emergency medicine (EM). This part includes substance abuse, trauma, pulmonary, and toxicology. Part 1 reviews cardiovascular, neurology, sports medicine, and pain.

This video can be viewed in its entirety online when you click the video above or click here.

High Fidelity Case-based Simulation Debriefing: Everything You Need to Know from Academic Emergency Medicine on Vimeo.

In this 30-minute talk, the authors take an in-depth look at how to debrief high-fidelity case-based simulation sessions, including discussion on debriefing theory, goals, approaches, and structure, as well as ways to create a supportive and safe learning environment, resulting in successful small group learning and self-reflection. Emphasis is placed on the “debriefing with good judgment” approach. Video clips of sample debriefing attempts, highlighting the “dos and don’ts” of simulation debriefing, are included. The goal of this talk is to provide you with the necessary tools and information to develop a successful and effective debriefing approach. There is a bibliography and a quick reference guide in Data Supplements S1 and S2 (available as supporting information in the online version of this paper).

This video can be viewed in its entirety online when you click the video above or click here.

Assessing the Utility of Digital Rectal Exams in the ED from Academic Emergency Medicine on Vimeo.

The third Academic Emergency Medicine video lecture has published. The videos in our Peer-reviewed Lecture Series (PeRLs) are intended to represent the state-of-the-art in emergency medicine education. Residents, practicing physicians, and medical students may use them for didactic education.

Assessing the Utility of Digital Rectal Exams in the ED
Digital rectal exams (DREs) are a regular part of many emergency department (ED) evaluations. This presentation looks at previous cases and current studies done on the efficacy, efficiency, and necessity of these rectal exams as part of normal procedure. The DRE has been shown to perform poorly in the secondary trauma survey. Further, it has been shown to have poor sensitivity as a screening exam, yielding high false-negative percentages diagnosing index injuries and urethral disruptions. Also, based on physician survey, DREs only add pertinent information in an estimated 5% of cases and change management in 4% of cases. Another purpose of the DRE is to measure anal sphincter tone; however, anal sphincter tone correlates poorly with the “criterion standard” of manometry, yielding poor sensitivity and positive predictive value. Performing a “squeeze” test appears to be the more efficient method to get the desired results. When examining the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in both children and adults, studies have concluded that DREs give no significant direction in diagnosis and can be most likely omitted in the evaluation of acute undifferentiated abdominal pain and acute appendicitis. Finally, there are limited data reflecting the utility of a DRE before heparin use in the ED. In summary, emergency physicians should implement selective, rather than discretionary, use of the DRE.

This lecture can be viewed in its entirety online when you click the video above or click here.

ECG Diagnosis of Acute STEMI-Equivalent in the Presence of Left Bundle Branch Block from Academic Emergency Medicine on Vimeo.

The second Academic Emergency Medicine video lecture has published. The videos in our Peer-reviewed Lecture Series (PeRLs) are intended to represent the state-of-the-art in emergency medicine education. Residents, practicing physicians, and medical students may use them for didactic education.

About ECG Diagnosis of Acute STEMI-Equivalent in the Presence of Left Bundle Branch Block
This 30 minute talk will cover 1) the reasons why the ECG has a reputation for poor sensitivity in the diagnosis of acute MI in the presence of LBBB, and 2) show how, just like in the presence of normal conduction, the ECG in LBBB is actually quite sensitive for coronary occlusion (for STEMI equivalent), even though it is not for old MI or Non-STEMI. The lecture will demonstrate concordance of ST segments, and both appropriate and excessive discordance. In particular, some new ideas regarding proportionally excessively discordant ST Elevation will be covered, and some angiographic data to support the notion that, using this technique, the diagnosis of acute STEMI-equivalent in the presence of LBBB is actually quite sensitive and specific. This method will be demonstrated on several ECGs.

This lecture can be viewed in its entirety online when you click the video above or click here.

The Millennial Generation & "The Lecture" from Academic Emergency Medicine on Vimeo.

The first Academic Emergency Medicine video lecture has published. The videos in our new Peer-reviewed Lecture Series (PeRLs) are intended to represent the state-of-the-art in emergency medicine education. Residents, practicing physicians, and medical students may use them for didactic education.

About The Millennial Generation & "The Lecture"
In this 30-minute talk, we will briefly discuss the characteristics of the Millennial Generation and explore in depth how these characteristics relate to their ability, or inability, to learn productively in a traditional lecture-style format. The goal of this talk is to expand or refine the armamentarium of tools to use when designing your large-group educational sessions, to maximize the learning and retention of information for your students.

This lecture can be viewed in its entirety online when you click the video above or click here.

Do you have a PeRL to share?

PeRLs are intended to represent the state-of-the-art in emergency medicine education. Residents, practicing physicians, and medical students may use them for didactic education. The videos should contain both the presented audiovisual materials for the lectures (such as PowerPoint slides) and live video of the presenter.

  • Each video lecture should contain the following information:
  • A written abstract describing the content of the lecture
  • Lecture title, author, and institutional affiliation on a title slide
  • Conflict of interest statement A brief overview of the lecture content (~ 1 minute)
  • The body of the lecture ( 30 minutes) References and further reading (~ 30 seconds)
  • Contact information for questions

Prospective authors should consider contacting the PeRLs editorial board (through John Burton, MD, Senior Associate Editor: jhburton@carilionclinic.org) for a discussion before starting on video production of a lecture for a determination of topic suitability. Videos can be complex to produce, and given the effort involved, having a discussion with an editor either by e-mail or phone before producing it, is recommended.


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