Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica

Cover image for Vol. 130 Issue 2

Edited By: Povl Munk-Jørgensen

Impact Factor: 4.857

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2012: 12/121 (Psychiatry (Social Science)); 18/135 (Psychiatry)

Online ISSN: 1600-0447

Article of the Month


JULY 2014

Cognitive deficits in youth with familial and clinical high risk to psychosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

A high proportion of patients with psychotic disorders are also suffering from cognitive impairment. However, the causal relation between psychosis and cognitive dysfunction remains elusive. In the July issue of Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Bora and colleagues present a large meta-analysis on cognitive deficits in youth with familial and clinical high risk of psychosis. Their findings of increased prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in both groups are consistent with previous literature. Additionally, they report more severe cognitive impairment when these two risk factors are co-occurring. The authors suggest that future research should include more longitudinal studies, in order to identify mechanisms behind this correlation, as well as predictors for the course and outcome of psychotic disorders.

E. Bora et al.

JUNE 2014

What was learned: studies by the consortium for research in ECT (CORE) 1997-2011

ECT is an effective treatment for severe psychiatric illnesses including unipolar and bipolar depression, psychotic depression, catatonia and delirious mania but remains an underutilized treatment in some countries. In the June issue of Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, M. Fink reviews findings from the most comprehensive ECT studies done to date and places them within a historical context. In this review, M. Fink highlights findings in terms of clinical predictors of outcome (e.g. including psychosis, suicide risk, polarity, melancholia, atypical depression and age) and several technical aspects of treatment. The author concludes that ECT is an efficacious treatment for both unipolar and bipolar depression, particularly melancholic or psychotic depression, and rapidly relieves active suicide risk.

M. Fink

Electroconvulsive therapy reappraised

In an accompanying Editorial Comment, T.G. Bolwig discusses the conclusions by M. Fink.

MAY 2014

SPECIAL ISSUE: A Bipolar Maze: A Roadmap through Translational
Guest Editor, Eduard Vieta

Our publisher Wiley has accepted that we instead of selecting one article as ’article of the month’ present the entire May issue to our readers. This because the May issue entitled “The bipolar maze: a roadmap through translational psychopathology” is a special issue which gives examples of the richness and broadness of today’s bipolar research: epidemiology on age at onset, comorbidity, biomarkers, clinical trial methodology, treatment and medication adherence. The issue is edited by guest editor Professor Eduard Vieta, Barcelona, Spain who has also written the opening editorial: The bipolar maze: a roadmap through translational psychopathology.

Povl Munk-Jørgensen, Editor, Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica

FEBRUARY 2014

A profile approach to impulsivity in bipolar disorder: the key role of strong emotions
L. Muhtadie, S. L. Johnson, C. S. Carver, I. H. Gotlib, T. A. Ketter

Impulsivity is a hallmark symptom of bipolar disorder (BD), and previous research has highlighted its association with illness onset and severity. In the February issue of Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Muhtadie and colleagues present a study designed to test which domains of impulsivity are most informative of clinical severity in BD. The investigators adeptly integrate their findings into the impulsivity and BD literature and also suggest potential targets for therapeutic intervention, including the development of effective emotion regulation and impulse control strategies.

Max Martinson, Amber Cardoos, Rosemary Walker, James Doorley, Angela Pisoni, Kelley Durham Depression Clinical & Research Program (DCRP) Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (MA), USA

JANUARY 2014

DSM-5 criteria for depression with mixed features: a farewell to mixed depression
A. Koukopoulos n, G. Sani

Throughout its history, the DSM has struggled to categorize mixed forms of mood disorders. With its fifth edition, the DSMproposes a new way to diagnose depression with mixed features. Koukopoulos and Sani’s critique of the DSM-5’s proposed criteria for depression with mixed features in the January issue of Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica argues that the symptoms that the DSM-5 specifies are neither scientifically nor clinically comprehensive.Koukopoulos and Sanipropose a different set of symptoms which they argue are more clinically adept.

Max Martinson, Amber Cardoos, Rosemary Walker, James Doorley, Angela Pisoni, Kelley Durham Depression Clinical & Research Program (DCRP) Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (MA), USA

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