Traffic

Cover image for Vol. 18 Issue 5

Edited By: Michael S. Marks, Trina A. Schroer, Robert G. Parton and Sharon A. Tooze

Online ISSN: 1600-0854

Cover Gallery Volume 10


Volume 10

For covers from other volumes, go back to the Cover Gallery index.

Browse the covers of Volume 10 below.

Cover Image

Vol. 10, Iss. 12, December 2009

Cover Legend: Decorating homes with greens around the time of the winter solstice is an ancient tradition that dates back at least as far as Scandinavian and Teutonic Yule celebrations and the Roman feast of Saturnalia. Greens were brought into the home as natural symbols of life and hope for the return of longer days and the warmth they would bring. The Romans decorated tree boughs with trinkets and candles and exchanged them with friends for good luck.

The cell depicting the "tree" is a stable Hela:CD1a transfectant transiently transfected with EGFP-Rab22a and stained with anti-CD1a antibody (in red). Image courtesy of Barral et al. (Traffic 2008; 9(9):1446-1457). The "star" is Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites inside the parasitophorous vacuole of an infected human fibroblast. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of a parasite adhesin complex stored in the secretory organelles called micronemes (stained with anti-MIC6 antibodies). Image courtesy of Dominique Soldati (University of Geneva).
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Cover Image

Vol. 10, Iss. 11, November 2009

Cover Legend: Lipid storage in HuH7 hepatoma cells. The novel dye LD540 allows multi-color imaging of cytoplasmic lipid droplets (red) together with the lipid droplet protein EGFP-Rab18 (green), filamentous actin (Alexa 647-phalloidin, magenta) and the nucleus (DAPI, blue). Image courtesy of Christophe Thiele (see Spandl et al., Traffic 2009; 10(11)).
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Cover Image

Vol. 10, Iss. 10, October 2009

Cover Legend: View of a model generated by the tomographic reconstructions of HPF/FS samples of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. The image illustrates the existence of contact sites between the ER and the apicoplast outermost membrane (OMM). The OMM membrane of the plastid is presented in dark blue and the membrane of the ER in red. To visualize that the OMM remains intact, contentious structure the subsequent three membranes (the periplastid and the inner two membranes) are only partially drawn in yellow, light blue and green respectively. Image courtesy of Cveta Tomova (see Tomova et al., Traffic 2009; 10(10)).
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Cover Image

Vol. 10, Iss. 9, September 2009

Cover Legend: Nuclei were reconstituted in vitro using a partially clarified crude extract of Xenopus leavis eggs and imaged by field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Ring structures seen on the surface are nuclear pores. Such nuclei are robust for transport assays involving protein and DNA substrates. Image courtesy of Corine Lau, Douglass Forbes and Michael Elbaum (see Lachish-Zalait et al., Traffic 2009. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0854.2009.00968.x).
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Cover Image

Vol. 10, Iss. 8, August 2009

Cover Legend: Making sense of high throughput imaging - 1400 fluorescent microscopy images of cells containing proteins in 10 subcellular localizations spatially arranged in 3D by statistical similarity. High throughput protein localization imaging is generating massive image sets in excess of the ability of researchers to view and analyse them. Spatial layout by statistical similarity enables large image sets to be browsed and interacted with, comparison of images in high resolution, distinct patterns of localization to be readily observed, treated/untreated experiments to be compared, outlier images to be detected and representative images to be automatically chosen (see Hamilton, Traffic 2009;10(8)).
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Cover Image

Vol. 10, Iss. 7, July 2009

Cover Legend: Ultrastructural morphology of endosomal compartments after simultaneous depletion of all ESCRTs (Endosomal sorting complex required for transport). The brown colouring indicates enlarged, multivesicular endosomes (MVEs), which are still formed independently of ESCRT proteins. The red colour marks areas of endosomal membrane sheets that are docked together, displaying a typical, striated coat between the membrane layers. Within these membrane accumulations various smaller MVEs (cloured in green) are found. Mitochondria are marked in pink (see Stuffers et al., Traffic 2009; 10(7)).
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Cover Image

Vol. 10, Iss. 6, June 2009

Cover Legend: Fluorescence confocal image of HeLa cells co-expressing a raft-associated glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored avidin test probe (Av-GPI, red, background) and caveolin-1-EGFP (green, background). Labeling plasma membrane Av-GPI with quantum dots allows high-resolution and long-term single molecule tracking of the raft proteins (red traces, inset) to study their diffusive behaviors and interactions with various membrane microdomains such as caveolin-1-EGFP labeled caveolae (green, inset) or cholesterol and glycosphingolipid GM1-rich microdomains (see Pinaud et al., Traffic 2008;10(6)).
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Cover Image

Vol. 10, Iss. 5, May 2009

Cover Legend: Tobacco mosaic virus RNA was labeled during transcription using a Cy3-UTP probe. The labeled viral RNA (red) was encapsidated and injected together with GFP (green) into a single tobacco trichome cell. 5 min after injection, discrete vRNA granules (red) were observed in the cytoplasm. The virus also expressed cytosolic dsRed from its genome, allowing the cell-to-cell spread of infection to be monitored. The image shows the injected trichome basal cell and the underlying epidermis 24 hours after injection. GFP marks the injected cell and RNA granules (red) are seen in this cell. The spread of virus infection to the underlying epidermis is seen as diffuse cytosolic red fluorescence. Autofluorescence from chloroplasts is shown in blue (see Christensen et al., Traffic 2009; 10(5)).
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Cover Image

Vol. 10, Iss. 4, April 2009

Cover Legend: Cystatin F is a glycosylated cysteine protease inhibitor (shown in blue). Initially synthesized as a disulfide-linked dimer, cystatin F requires the mannose 6-phosphate receptor (shown in green) for its lysosomal localization and activation (right arrow). Following endocytic transport, active monomeric cystatin F binds and inhibits protease targets, such as cathepsin C. Alternatively, cystatin F is secreted as an inactive dimer. Secreted cystatin F is internalized and targeted to lysosomes via a mannose 6-phosphate-dependent mechanism resulting in the regulation of protease activity in bystander cells (left arrow) (see Colbert et al., Traffic 2009; 10(4)).
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Cover Image

Vol. 10, Iss. 3, March 2009

Cover Legend: An EM section through T. brucei showing the single Golgi apparatus (highlighted in red) located posterior to the nucleus (dark blue). Basal bodies seed the growth of flagellum (green) and are located near to the kinetoplast (dark blue), a single aggregate of mitochondrial DNA concentrated at a special region of the mitochondrial network (light blue). Image courtesy of Cynthia He (see Yelinek et al., Traffic 2009;10(3):300–306).
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Cover Image

Vol. 10, Iss. 2, February 2009

Cover Legend: Confocal slice of a 72h zebrafish embryo stained with a caveolin antibody (green) and DAPI (blue) (see Nixon et al., Traffic 2009; 10(2): 131–136).
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Cover Image

Vol. 10, Iss. 1, January 2009

Cover Legend: Cultured HeLa cell transiently co-transfected with a mutant form of 68kD spastin (spastinK388R; blue) and with a temperature sensitive variant of the vesicular stomatitis virus, tagged with green fluorescent protein (VSVG-GFP), which has been trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum by temperature shifting. The mutant spastin induces the appearance of and decorates abnormally bundled microtubules. The VSVG-GFP and the endoplasmic reticulum marker calreticulin (red) have been redistributed to co-localise with the abnormal microtubule bundles. Structures that are labeled by spastin, VSVG-GFP and calreticulin appear white (see Connell et al., Traffic 2009;10(1):42–56).
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