Traffic

Cover image for Vol. 17 Issue 10

Edited By: Michael S. Marks, Trina A. Schroer, Tom H. Stevens and Sharon A. Tooze

Online ISSN: 1600-0854

Cover Gallery Volume 13


Volume 13

For covers from other volumes, go back to the Cover Gallery index.

Browse the covers of Volume 13 below.

Cover Image

Vol. 13 Iss. 12, December 2012

Cover image shows a confocal immunofluorescence image of the endoplasmic reticulum protein calreticulin (red) recruited to the intracellular replicative compartment (termed an inclusion) formed by Chlamydia trachomatis serovar D (green) 24 hours post infection of cultured HeLa cells. Calreticulin is enriched in patches at the inclusion periphery and is also translocated into the inclusion lumen. See Dumoux et al. (Traffic 2012; 13(12): 1612-1627).
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Cover Image

Vol. 13 Iss. 11, November 2012

Cover Legend: Three dimensional rendering of a blood stage malaria parasite (a merozoite) mid way through invasion of a human erythrocyte obtained by four-colour confocal microscopy.

The image shows the red blood cell boundary in white, the parasite nucleus in blue, the merozoite-erythrocyte tight junction (a parasite derived structure that orchestrates invasion) in red and the presenilin-like Signal Peptide Peptidase in a perinuclear localisation in green. The image is part of a suit of experimental approaches that show that malaria parasite SPP does not play a direct role in the invasion process. Grid scale in 0.5 microns. (See Marapana et al. Traffic 2012; 13(11): 1457-1465).
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Cover Image

Vol. 13 Iss. 10, October 2012

Cover Legend: Plasmodium berghei liver parasites are surrounded by vesicles from the host late-endocytic pathway.

Hepa1-6 cells were infected with Plasmodium berghei sporozoites and samples were prepared for TEM analysis at 24 h post-infection. Electron micrograph shows a pseudocolored parasite cross-section in yellow, host cell vesicles surrounding the parasite in blue and the host cell nucleus in cyan. (Lopes da Silva et al. Traffic 2012; 13(10): 1351–1363).
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Cover Image

Vol. 13 Iss. 9, September 2012

Cover Legend: Wounding area of a human myotube 20 min after laser irradiation

Annexin A1 is strongly enriched and Phalloidin-atto 565 staining demonstrates the accumulation of F-actin (see Marg et al., Traffic 2012; 13(9):1286-1294).
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Cover Image

Vol. 13 Iss. 8, August 2012

Cover Legend: Distribution of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR, green) in the small intestine of WT (left panels) and myosin Ia knockout (right panels) mice

Center, composite image of cross-section from small intestine labeled for CFTR (green), F-actin (red) and nuclei (blue). Image was composed of the combined cross-sections of mouse duodenum (upper quadrants), jejunum (middle quadrants) and ileum (lower quadrants). Corresponding magnified inserts demonstrate that in all major segments of the myosin Ia small intestine CFTR is lost from the brush border, accumulates in the sub-apical space and appears on the basolateral membrane of the enterocytes. Image courtesy of N Ameen (see Kravtsov et al., Traffic 2012; 13(8): 1072-1082).
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Cover Image

Vol. 13 Iss. 7, July 2012

Cover Legend: The cover image, contributed by Aparna Sadananda and Krishanu Ray, is a collage of optical slices obtained from an abdominal segment of the Drosophila larval brain, expressing GFP::ChAT in cholinergic neurons

Depicted in false color intensity map (bottom left margin); the left half show the synapses of the dorsal neuropile region and the right half shows a neuron in the dorso-central part of the brain. Sadananda et al., (Traffic 2012; 13(7): 979-991) demonstrated that kinesin-2 motor a transport of ChAT in this system through a direct interaction between the cargo and the motor. Their works suggest a new alternate means of slow axonal transport.
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Cover Image

Vol. 13 Iss. 6, June 2012

Cover Legend: Three-dimensional model of the Golgi apparatus in a Rab6-depleted HeLa cell at a resolution of 4 nm

The model was prepared from electron tomography of a 300 nm thick HeLa cell section. Golgi cisternae are color coded from cis to trans, blue to tan. Accumulated COPI- and clathrin-coated structures are purple and white, respectively. Microtubules are modeled as linear rods. Bar = 0.5 µm. For a full description, see Storrie et al. (Traffic 2012; 13(5): 727-744).
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Cover Image

Vol. 13 Iss. 5, May 2012

Cover Legend: Pictured are submandibular salivary gland acini from transgenic mice expressing cytoplasmic GFP (green) and labeled for actin (red)

Secretory granules appear as dark vesicular structure that after fusion with the apical plasma membrane recruit actin (yellow), which is required to complete exocytosis. Image courtesy of Andrius Masedunskas and Roberto Weigert. (Traffic 2012; 13(5): 627-634).
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Cover Image

Vol. 13 Iss. 4, April 2012

Cover Legend: A ribbon diagram of the clathrin heavy chain N-terminal domain β-propeller

This portion of the clathrin trimer can engage many different membrane-associated endocytic proteins. The four, spatially separate, interaction surfaces upon the terminal domain, designated site 1 to site 4, are color coded with key side chains shown in stick representation. In the background is a pseudocolored rapid freeze-deep etch image of the cytosolic face of a substrate-attached plasma membrane region from a cultured HeLa cell. The assembled polyhedral clathrin lattice in various stages of invagination is apparent, and evidence suggests that the assembly and budding of clathrin-coated vesicles requires at least one of the four functional terminal domain binding sites. (Lemmon and Traub. Traffic 2012; 13(4): 511-519).
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Cover Image

Vol. 13 Iss. 3, March 2012

Cover Legend: Morphological changes over time in SLO-induced endosomes generated during plasma membrane repair

NRK fibroblasts were incubated with the pore forming toxin SLO (upper panels) or not (lower panels) in the presence of BSA-gold for 5, 15 or 30 min and processed for transmission EM. Shortly after cell permeabilization SLO is endocytosed, ubiquitinated and subsequently sorted by the ESCRT complex into intraluminal vesicles of MVBs, where it is degraded. SLO-induced endosomes are more abundant, larger and enter late endocytic compartments faster than the constitutive endosomes observed in control cells. See Corrotte et al. (Traffic 2012; 13(3): 483-494).
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Cover Image

Vol. 13 Iss. 2, February 2012

Cover Legend: Morphology of a virus-containing intracellular plasma membrane-connected compartment (IPMC) in an HIV-1 infected human macrophage

Human monocyte-derived macrophages infected with HIV-1 for 14 days were fixed and embedded in Epon for transmission EM. HIV particles are seen in an IPMC near the cell surface. The membranes connecting the IPMC to the cell surface are decorated on their cytoplasmic surface by ˜30 nm thick electron-dense coats, thicker and more uniform than the radially stippled clathrin-coated pits nearby. Immunolabelling studies demonstrate that these coats contain the ß2 integrin CD18 and the cytoskeletal linker proteins talin, vinculin and paxillin that connect the clustered integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. These coated structures maintain the integrity of HIV-1 assembly compartments in primary human macrophages. See Pelchen-Matthews et al. (Traffic 2012; 13(2): 273-291).
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Cover Image

Vol. 13 Iss.1, January 2012

Cover Legend: Subcellular localization of the potassium channel Kv7.1 during a calcium switch in MDCK cells

Illustrated are 3D representations of confocal z-stacks of Kv7.1-expressing MDCK cells 0 hours, 30 minutes, 3 hours and 24 hours after initiation of the calcium switch. Kv7.1 is shown in green, a marker of the endoplasmic reticulum in red and the nucleus in blue. As illustrated, Kv7.1 has a very dynamic subcellular localization pattern during the switch (Andersen et al.; Traffic 2012; 13(1): 143-156).
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