Traffic

Cover image for Vol. 16 Issue 9

Edited By: Michael S. Marks, Trina A. Schroer, Tom H. Stevens, Sharon A. Tooze

Online ISSN: 1600-0854

Cover Gallery Volume 6


Volume 6

For covers from other volumes, go back to the Cover Gallery index.

Browse the covers of Volume 6 below.

Cover Image

Vol. 6, Iss. 12, Dec 2005

Cover Illustration: Pulsed laser nanosurgery on a Ptk-2 cell transiently tranfected with GFP F-actin. Stress fibers were dissected in vivo at the basal membrane of the cell using a laser line target perpendicular to the fibers axes. Intrinsically under tension and attached to focal adhesion sites, the fibers relax after nanosurgery by shortening from the new free end towards the adhesion point. Dimensions of the central micrograph: 60x65 µm. (See Colombelli et al. Traffic 2005; 6(12):1093-1102).
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Cover Image

Vol. 6, Iss. 11, Nov 2005

Cover Illustration: Progressive basal to apical confocal optical sections of the detergent-resistant pools of E-cadherin and FGFR1 in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells. MCF-7 cells were extracted using detergent (TX-100) prior to fixation (paraformaldehyde) and immunolabelled using antibodies against E-cadherin (red) and FGFR1 (green). Detergent insoluble E-cadherin is localized to cell-cell junctions and peripheral puncta, whilst FGFR1 is localized to large internal accumulations and to cell nuclei. (See Bryant DM and Stow JL. Traffic 2005;6(10):947–953).
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Cover Image Vol. 6, Iss. 10, Oct 2005

Cover Illustration: Three-dimensional (3D) model of a specific granule within a human eosinophil reveals intragranular membranous subcompartments. The granule limiting membrane was partially traced in red and intragranular vesiculotubular structures were outlined in blue. The intragranular membranous domains are organized as a flattened tubular network involved in the relocation of granulestored products upon activation. The 3D model was generated from 4 nm thick serial slices obtained by automated electron tomography. Human eosinophils were isolated from blood, stimulated with eotaxin, chemically fixed and embedded in Eponate. (See Melo et al. Traffic 2005; 6(10):866-879).
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Cover Image

Vol. 6, Iss. 9, Sep 2005

Cover Illustration: Golgi recovery in response to collapse into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by the drug brefeldin A (BFA) occurs through sequential intermediates following BFA washout. Recovery begins from pre-Golgi compartments containing a heterogeneous mixture (orange) of all Golgi components (upper left panel), followed within 5-10 min by formation of a condensed onion-like structure containing concentric cisternae (upper right panel) in which cis (green) and trans (red) Golgi compartments begin to segregate from the mixed compartments (orange). By 20–30 min, the cis (red), medial (yellow) and trans (red) cisternal organization of the Golgi stack is restored (lower panel). As described by Bannyhk et al. (Traffic 2005; 6(9):803–819) recovery is dependent on the GTPases Sar1 controlling ER exit and Rab1 that regulates Golgi membrane targeting and fusion hubs, but is surprisingly independent of the Golgi GTPase Arf1 thought to be involved in retrograde COPI vesicle formation and Golgi enzyme recycling.
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Cover Image

Vol. 6, Iss. 8, Aug 2005

Cover Illustration: Artistic view of macrophage vacuoles containing Rhodococcus equi as viewed by transmission electron microscopy. R. equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen which can cause lethal tuberculosis-like disease in very young foals and in AIDS patients. Here, the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774E has been used in transmission electron microscopic analysis to study the development of R. equi-containing vacuoles (RCVs). The vacuole seen in the centre is relatively spacious, contains two bacteria (green) and numerous vesicles (purple). Also, electron-dense vesicles (blue) which are likely lysosomes, surround the vacuole. The RCV is unique in that it passes through the ‘early phagosome’ stage, yet does not mature into a ‘late’ compartment. The most apparent molecular features of RCVs are their exclusion of the proton-pumping ATPase and of lysosomal hydrolases from RCVs. Within one to four days of infection, the host macrophage is killed. Image courtesy of Eugenia Fernandez and Albert Haas (see Fernandez-Mora et al. Traffic 2005;6(8):635–653).
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Cover Image

Vol. 6, Iss. 7, Jul 2005

Cover Illustration: Confocal micrograph showing immunolocalization of syntaxin 2 (green) and beta-tubulin (red) in NRK cells during the midbody stage of cytokinesis. Nuclei are stained with DAPI (blue). Image courtesy of Seng Hui Low and Thomas Weimbs, Department of Cell Biology, Lerner Research Institute, The Cleveland Clinic (Low et al. Dev Cell 2003;4:753-759). See related review in the August 2005 issue of Traffic (E Joo, CW Tsang, WS Trimble. Traffic 2005; 6(8): in press.)
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Cover Image

Vol. 6, Iss. 6, Jun 2005

Cover Illustration: The cover shows the immunohistochemical image of the developing somites in an E10 mouse embryo labeled for the Ozz protein (purple). The localization of Ozz is restricted to the tips of the myotomal cells, juxtaposed to the intermyotomal septa. Image courtesy of A. D’Azzo (see D’Azzo et al. Traffic 2005; 6(6):429-441).
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Cover Image

Vol. 6, Iss. 5, May 2005

Cover Illustration: The distribution of peroxisomes and microtubules in cultured human fibroblasts. Cells were stained with antibodies directed against catalase (red) and β-tubulin (green) and imaged by confocal microscopy. Microtubules, previously demonstrated to be involved in the tethering and movement of peroxisomes, are now implicated in the early stages of peroxisomal biogenesis. (See Brocard et al. Traffic 2005;6(5):386–395, image courtesy of Dr. Paul Walton, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada).
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Cover Image

Vol. 6, Iss. 4, Apr 2005

Cover Illustration: Confocal micrograph of docked secretory dense-core granules in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. Granules were visualized by indirect immunofluorescence using monoclonal antibody 5E9, which is directed against one of the major granule cargo proteins, Grl3p. The image is assembled from a stack of sections representing the top half of the cell. Granules are pseudocolored in accordance with their depth in the stack. Red is at the top surface of the cell; blue is at the cell center. Photo by Grant Bowman and Kyle Edwards (see Bowman et al. Traffic 2004; 6(4): 303–323).
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Cover Image

Vol. 6, Iss. 3, Mar 2005

Cover Illustration: The nuclear envelope from a Xenopus laevisoocyte was imaged in negative stain by transmission electron microscopy. A single nuclear pore was selected, processed in the computer by eight-fold rotational averaging, and tiled to produce a regular pattern. Separate color schemes were applied to the background and to the pores. (Image courtesy of Michael Elbaum).
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Cover Image

Vol. 6, Iss. 2, Feb 2005

Cover Illustration: HeLa cells stained with rhodamine-phalloidin. Provided by Molly Moran and Elizabeth Sztul.
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Cover Image

Vol. 6, Iss. 1, Jan 2005

Cover Illustration: Scanning electron microscopy image of uropathogenic E. Coli(UPEC) bound to, and emerging from within, mouse superficial epithelial cells that line the lumenal surface of the bladder. During the course of a urinary tract infection, many of the bacteria become transiently filamentous in response to innate host defence mechanisms. (See Bower et al. Traffic 2005; 6(1):18-31).
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