Traffic

Cover image for Vol. 18 Issue 9

Edited By: Michael S. Marks, Trina A. Schroer, Robert G. Parton and Sharon A. Tooze

Online ISSN: 1600-0854

Cover Gallery Volume 7


Volume 7

For covers from other volumes, go back to the Cover Gallery index.

Browse the covers of Volume 7 below.

Cover Image

Vol. 7, Iss. 12, Dec 2006

B cell tumor line (LK35) live stained with fluorescent dyes FM4-64 and ER-Tracker Blue-White DPX. The green channel shows the fluorescence of FM4-64 when excited at 622/32 nm (center wavelength/bandpass); at this excitation wavelength the dye fluoresces predominantly in the nuclear envelope, visualizing prominent nuclear convolutions characteristic of this and other cancers. The red channel is the fluorescence of FM4-64 when excited at 510/20 nm; this shows endocytic vesicles and the cell membrane (emission at 700/75 nm for both channels). The blue channel is the fluorescence of ER-Tracker Blue-White DPX imaged at 430/25 excitation and 470/30 nm emission. The image was recorded using Slidebook 4 software, a Coolsnap HQ camera, and a Zeiss Axiovert 200M microscope with a 60x NA1.4 oil objective. (See Zal et al. Traffic 2006; 7(12):1607-1613).
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Cover Image

Vol. 7, Iss. 11, Nov 2006

The cortactin homologue HS1 is required to stabilize actin at sites of T cell receptor engagement. Jurkat T cells expressing GFP actin were imaged while spreading on anti-TCR coated coverslips . Top row, HS1-suppressed cells. Bottom row, control cells. See Review by Billadeau & Burkhardt in this issue (Traffic 2006; 7(11):1451-1460).
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Cover Image

Vol. 7, Iss. 10, Oct 2006

The cover image illustrates a growth cone from a cultured rat sympathetic neuron under the combined inhibition of myosin-II and cytoplasmic dynein; stained for both actin (green) and microtubules (violet). When dynein alone is inhibited, microtubules fail to invade filopodia, but when myosin-II is also inhibited, microtubules freely invade filopodia.  These data support a model in which an antagonistic force relationship between these two molecular motors acts to regulate microtubule advance into filopodia, which is necessary for growth cone navigation. (Myers et al. Traffic 2006 7(10): 1333-1351).
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Cover Image

Vol. 7, Iss. 9, Sep 2006

Identification and characterization of ALDI (0610006F02Rik) as a major component of lipid droplets. Legends from top left panel to right: (A,B) GFP-ALDI (green) on Nile Red positive lipid droplets (red). (C,D) As shown by electron microscopy, lipid droplets formed in hepatocytes after partial hepatectomy. (E) GFP-ALDI on lipid droplets of lipid-loaded COS cell. (F) Fatty acid loading induces translocation of GFP-ALDI from the endoplasmic reticulum (top panel) into nascent lipid droplets (bottom panel). (See Turró et al. for more details. Traffic 2006;7(9):1254-1269).
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Cover Image

Vol. 7, Iss. 8, Aug 2006

Chlamydia trachomatis inclusion in association with a spindle pole in a mitotic cell leading to partitioning of the inclusion to a single daughter cell. Cells were stained for chlamydia (red), microtubules (green), and DNA (blue). This association is maintained through out the cell cycle and can lead to chromosomal segregation defects. (See Grieshaber et al. Traffic 2006;7(8):940–949).
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Cover Image

Vol. 7, Iss. 7, Jul 2006

Dynamin inactivation leads to the accumulation of free cholesterol in the endolysosomal network. HeLa cells were incubated with 200 µg/ml purified human LDL for 24 hours. In cells expressing the K44A dynamin mutant (center), filipin staining revealed an accumulation of free cholesterol (red) in swollen endosomal compartments that were positive for Lamp1 (green). See Robinet et al. Traffic 2006; 7(7):811-823.
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Cover Image

Vol. 7, Iss. 6, Jun 2006

Light microscopic images of Weibel-Palade bodies emerging from the pericentriolar region of HUVECs. Cells were stained for VWF (blue) and P-selectin (red) to reveal the P-selectin-positive newly-formed Weibel-Palade Bodies. The pericentriolar CD63 (green) is not present on these immature organelles but is present in the endosomes of this part of the cell. Image from Harrison-Lavoie et al. Traffic 2006; 7(6):647-662.
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Cover Image

Vol. 7, Iss. 5, May 2006

This issue of TRAFFIC features four invited reviews and an accompanying Preface about roles for the cytoskeleton in intracellular trafficking. The upper portion of the cover figure depicts how microtubule plus end-directed motors may facilitate transport of other microtubules into the axon interior, as discussed in the Baas and Nadar review. The lower portion shows how microtubule minus end motors, like dyneins, transport infectious viruses from their sites of entry at the cell periphery to the perinuclear region, a topic addressed in the Leopold and Pfister review. Image courtesy of George S. Bloom.
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Cover Image

Vol. 7, Iss. 4, Apr 2006

Floral organization of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites inside the parasitophorous vacuole of an infected human fibroblast. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of a parasite adhesin complex stored in the secretory organelles called micronemes (stained with anti-MIC6 antibodies). Image courtesy of Dominique Soldati (University of Geneva). See associated Traffic Report in this issue (Lehmann and Frischknecht. Traffic 2006; 7(4): 478-486).
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Cover Image

Vol. 7, Iss. 3, Mar 2006

Cover Illustration: Engagement of multiple ubiquitin monomers promotes efficient clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The structure of the S5a ubiquitin-interaction motif (UIM) domain containing two tandemly arrayed UIM repeats each bound to a single ubiquitin monomer is shown (PDB codes 1YX5 and 1YX6). The mostly helical S5a UIM segment is colored grey while each ubiquitin is colored purple to red from amino to carboxyl terminus. On the right, HeLa cells transiently transfected with Tac fused to four intracytoplasmic, linearly-linked ubiquitin monomers were incubated on ice simultaneously with anti-Tac antibodies (green) and fluorescent transferrin (red) and uptake assessed after shifting the labeled cells to 37°C for 20 minutes. Prominent accumulation of both labels within intracellular endosomes in the transfected cells shows that polyubiquitin serves as a robust internalization signal that is recognized by endocytic UIM proteins. (See Hawryluk et al., Traffic 2006; 7(3):262–281).
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Cover Image

Vol. 7, Iss. 2, Feb 2006

Cover Illustration: Compound exocytosis in the exocrine pancreas. The image shows pancreatic acinar cells that have been stimulated with acetylcholine. The membranes of the cells are lined with F-actin (green). The F-actin staining is particularly prominent at the apical domains of the cells, with which zymogen granules have fused. Fused granules are filled with the membrane-impermeant extracellular dye Texas Red-dextran and surrounded by F-actin coats. Some granules have fused directly with the apical membrane, while others, further from the membrane, have fused with exocytosed granules. Nuclei are stained blue. Image courtesy of Dr. J.M. Edwardson (see review in this issue of Traffic).
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Cover Image

Vol. 7, Iss. 1, Jan 2006

Cover Illustration: Transmission electron microscopy of Platinum/Carbon replicas obtained by rotary shadowing of “unroofed” HeLa cells. Regularly formed round clathrin coated pits and vesicles in control cells (upper left panel) are replaced by larger irregularly shaped structures after CALM-depletion by RNAi. Magnification: x180000. Image courtesy of Dr. Ernst Ungewickell. See accompanying article Traffic 2005; 6(12): 1225–1234.
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