GCB Bioenergy

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 3

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Steve Long

Impact Factor: 6.151

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 1/83 (Agronomy); 9/88 (Energy & Fuels)

Online ISSN: 1757-1707

Associated Title(s): Global Change Biology

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  1. 1 - 50
  1. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Time-dependent climate impact and energy efficiency of combined heat and power production from short-rotation coppice willow using pyrolysis or direct combustion

      Niclas Ericsson, Cecilia Sundberg, Åke Nordberg, Serina Ahlgren and Per-Anders Hansson

      Version of Record online: 17 FEB 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12415

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Can the agricultural AquaCrop model simulate water use and yield of a poplar short-rotation coppice?

      Joanna A. Horemans, Hanne Van Gaelen, Dirk Raes, Terenzio Zenone and Reinhart Ceulemans

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12422

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      User-friendly and reliable models are needed to accurately estimate water use, biomass production, and the generated energy of short-rotation coppice plantations under different environmental conditions. This study focuses on water use and biomass production of poplars in bioenergy plantations and shows that the agricultural model AquaCrop can be used as a complement for the more complex process-based forest models that have been used so far. AquaCrop can reliably simulate evapotranspiration (calibrated with eddy covariance data) and potential yield of a poplar short-rotation coppice plantation. It can also detect yield gaps caused by the management or by environmental problems.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Carbon balances of bioenergy systems using biomass from forests managed with long rotations: bridging the gap between stand and landscape assessments

      Olivia Cintas, Göran Berndes, Annette L. Cowie, Gustaf Egnell, Hampus Holmström, Gregg Marland and Göran I. Ågren

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12425

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Accumulation of soil organic carbon after cropland conversion to short-rotation willow and poplar

      Petros Georgiadis, Lars Vesterdal, Inge Stupak and Karsten Raulund-Rasmussen

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12416

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We evaluated whether cropland conversion to short-rotation woody crops (SRWCs) may provide a sink for soil carbon, thus contributing to climate change mitigation. We used a chronosequence of 26 paired plots (adjacent cropland used as proxy for initial SOC in SRWC) to determine the effect on SOC stock of land-use change from cropland to two different SRWC species, willow and poplar. Results showed that the SOC stocks corrected by equivalent soil masses were 1.7 times higher in SRWC compared to cropland in the top 5 cm (P < 0.001) and 1.2 times higher in the top 25 cm (P = 0.003). No changes could be detected in 0–40 cm (P = 0.32), or 0–100 cm (P = 0.29). The SOC stock ratios for SRWC vs. cropland did not change significantly with time since conversion, but were negatively correlated to SOC in cropland and fine soil percentage. There was no significant difference between willow and poplar at any depth.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Coupled biochar amendment and limited irrigation strategies do not affect a degraded soil food web in a maize agroecosystem, compared to the native grassland

      Yamina Pressler, Erika J. Foster, John C. Moore and M. Francesca Cotrufo

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12429

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We investigated the effects of coupled biochar amendment and limited irrigation on belowground food web structure and function in an irrigated maize agroecosystem. Neither biochar amendment nor limited irrigation had a significant effect on biomass of the soil biota groups. Modeled soil respiration and nitrogen mineralization fluxes were not different between treatments. A comparison of the structure and function of the agroecosystem soil food web and a nearby native grassland revealed that in this temperate system, the negative impact of long-term conventional agricultural management outweighed the impact of biochar and limited irrigation.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Annual balances and extended seasonal modelling of carbon fluxes from a temperate fen cropped to festulolium and tall fescue under two-cut and three-cut harvesting regimes

      Tanka P. Kandel, Lars Elsgaard and Poul E. Lærke

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12424

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study, we report annual carbon balance of a drained riparian fen under two-cut (2C) or three-cut (3C) managements of festulolium and tall fescue. CO2 fluxes measured with closed chambers were partitioned into gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) for modelling according to environmental factors (light and temperature) and canopy reflectance (ratio vegetation index, RVI). Annual CO2 fluxes and biomass yield were not significantly different in the crop/management combinations although the individual collars (n = 12) showed some variations in GPP (−1818 to −2409 g CO2-C m−2), ER (1071 to 1738 g CO2-C m−2), net ecosystem exchange (NEE, −669 to −949 g CO2-C m−2) and biomass yield (556 to 1044 g CO2-C m−2). Net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) as the sum of NEE and biomass carbon export was only slightly negative to positive in all crop/management combinations.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Cover crop root contributions to soil carbon in a no-till corn bioenergy cropping system

      Emily E. Austin, Kyle Wickings, Marshall D. McDaniel, G. Philip Robertson and A. Stuart Grandy

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12428

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Impact of six lignocellulosic biochars on C and N dynamics of two contrasting soils

      Rivka B. Fidel, David A. Laird and Timothy B. Parkin

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12414

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Could Miscanthus replace maize as the preferred substrate for anaerobic digestion in the United Kingdom? Future breeding strategies

      Sarah J. Purdy, Anne L. Maddison, Christopher P. Nunn, Ana Winters, Emma Timms-Taravella, Charlotte M. Jones, John C. Clifton-Brown, Iain S. Donnison and Joe A. Gallagher

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12419

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The abundance of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) was analysed in diverse genotypes of green-cut Miscanthus with a view to replacing maize as the preferred substrate for anaerobic digestion. The maximum yield of NSC was 5-fold lower than maize but there was wide diversity in this trait to target for breeding.

    10. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Predicting future biomass yield in Miscanthus using the carbohydrate metabolic profile as a biomarker

      Anne L. Maddison, Anyela Camargo-Rodriguez, Ian M. Scott, Charlotte M. Jones, Dafydd M. O. Elias, Sarah Hawkins, Alice Massey, John Clifton-Brown, Niall P. McNamara, Iain S. Donnison and Sarah J. Purdy

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12418

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The carbohydrate metabolic profile was used as a biomarker to predict yields in Miscanthus. The modelled vs. actual yields had a correlation of R = 0.67, demonstrating that yield could be predicted to a high degree of accuracy. Yield was linked to the partitioning of carbohydrates between cellulose and starch.

    11. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Environmental impacts of bioenergy wood production from poplar short-rotation coppice grown at a marginal agricultural site in Germany

      Janine Schweier, Saúl Molina-Herrera, Andrea Ghirardo, Rüdiger Grote, Eugenio Díaz-Pinés, Jürgen Kreuzwieser, Edwin Haas, Klaus Butterbach-Bahl, Heinz Rennenberg, Jörg-Peter Schnitzler and Gero Becker

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12423

    12. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Transcriptomic characterization of candidate genes responsive to salt tolerance of Miscanthus energy crops

      Zhihong Song, Qin Xu, Cong Lin, Chengcheng Tao, Caiyun Zhu, Shilai Xing, Yangyang Fan, Wei Liu, Juan Yan, Jianqiang Li and Tao Sang

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12413

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Miscanthus lutarioriparius, an endemic species in central China, is considered to be a promising candidate of second-generation energy crops. Seeds of the five populations of M. lutarioriparius were collected in natural habitats and planted in the experimental field (natural saline soil) in Dongying, Shandong province of China. After one year long-term salt stress, the growth status of Suaeda salsa that originally derived from the experimental field and one of the five populations of M. lutarioriparius are as the picture showed. Compared with S. salsa, the better growth status of M. lutarioriparius indicated that it has the capability of producing high biomass on the saline marginal land.

    13. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Predicting soil C changes over sugarcane expansion in Brazil using the DayCent model

      Dener M. S. Oliveira, Stephen Williams, Carlos E. P. Cerri and Keith Paustian

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12427

    14. You have full text access to this Open Access content
      Wood pellets, what else? Greenhouse gas parity times of European electricity from wood pellets produced in the south-eastern United States using different softwood feedstocks

      Steef V. Hanssen, Anna S. Duden, Martin Junginger, Virginia H. Dale and Floor van der Hilst

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12426

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We investigate whether and when wood-pellet electricity reduces overall GHG emissions compared to EU fossil-fuel-based electricity. We compare the GHG balance of wood-pellet electricity from four softwood feedstocks, against alternative scenarios that are combinations of alternative feedstock fates. GHG balances of wood-pellet electricity equal those of alternative scenarios within 0–29 years (the GHG parity time), after which wood-pellet electricity has sustained GHG benefits. Pellets from thinnings or mill/harvest residues cause fastest GHG benefits (0- to 6-year parity times).

    15. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Contribution of above- and belowground bioenergy crop residues to soil carbon

      Joao L. N. Carvalho, Tara W. Hudiburg, Henrique C. J. Franco and Evan H. DeLucia

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12411

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      GHG mitigation by bioenergy crops depends on crop type, management practices, and the input of residue carbon (C) to the soil. Perennial grasses may increase soil C compared to annual crops because of more extensive root systems, but it is less clear how much soil C is derived from above- vs. belowground inputs. This study suggests that aboveground crop residues were the main C-residue source to the soil in the current bioethanol sector (corn and sugarcane) and the indiscriminate removal of crop residues to produce cellulosic biofuels can reduce soil C stocks and reduce the environmental benefits of bioenergy. Moreover, a switch to feedstocks such as miscanthus with more allocation to belowground C could increase soil C stocks at a much faster rate.

  2. Technical Advance

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      BETYdb: a yield, trait, and ecosystem service database applied to second-generation bioenergy feedstock production

      David LeBauer, Rob Kooper, Patrick Mulrooney, Scott Rohde, Dan Wang, Stephen P. Long and Michael C. Dietze

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12420

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Biofuel Ecophysiological Traits and Yields database (BETYdb) provides an open-access repository of trait, yield, and ecosystem data in a common format. The database contains over forty thousand curated records representing crops being evaluated for biomass production as well as native vegetation. Here, we describe the database and data and present the results of two meta-analyses: One analysis confirms that Miscanthus produces more than twice as much biomass as switchgrass under varied environments, and the second analysis compares traits related to productivity among two grasses and two coppice shrubs.

  3. Original Research

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      Spatial evaluation of switchgrass productivity under historical and future climate scenarios in Michigan

      Lin Liu and Bruno Basso

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12417

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Our results showed spatial distributions of areas with low risk of failing to having more than 8000 kg ha−1 yr−1 switchgrass aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) under rainfed and unfertilized conditions in Michigan. We also showed constraining factors for switchgrass growth, and tested the effect of nitrogen fertilizer application on plant productivity across Michigan for 30 years under three climate scenarios (baseline climate in 1981–2010, future climate with emissions using RCP 2.6 and RCP 6.0). Lastly, the results suggested that the majority of Michigan's land could have high switchgrass ANPP and low risk of failure with no more than 60 kgN ha−1 fertilizer input. Our methodology can be applied to understanding the risks of producing other biofuel crop at different spatial scales.

  4. Research Reviews

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Agronomic and environmental implications of sugarcane straw removal: a major review

      João Luís Nunes Carvalho, Roberta Corrêa Nogueirol, Lauren Maine Santos Menandro, Ricardo de Oliveira Bordonal, Clovis Daniel Borges, Heitor Cantarella and Henrique C. Junqueira Franco

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12410

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Schematic summary of the implications of sugarcane straw removal on soil quality, feedstock production and bioenergy production indicators. Negative (-), positive (+) and (+/-) sings indicate a tendency of reduction, improvement or uncertain effects found in the literature, respectively.

  5. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Can intensification reduce emission intensity of biofuel through optimized fertilizer use? Theory and the case of oil palm in Indonesia

      Meine van Noordwijk, Ni'matul Khasanah and Sonya Dewi

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12398

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Simple field methods for quantifying the carbon stocks in oil palm plantations contribute data to the calculated footprint of palm oil in response to N fertilizer rates.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Field-grown transgenic switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) with altered lignin does not affect soil chemistry, microbiology, and carbon storage potential

      Jennifer M. DeBruyn, David A. Bevard, Michael E. Essington, Julie Y. McKnight, Sean M. Schaeffer, Holly L. Baxter, Mitra Mazarei, David G. J. Mann, Richard A. Dixon, Fang Chen, Chunliu Zhuo, Zeng-Yu Wang and Charles Neal Stewart Jr

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12407

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Collecting soil samples from experimental plots grown with transgenic switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) with altered lignin.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Investigating the biochar effects on C-mineralization and sequestration of carbon in soil compared with conventional amendments using the stable isotope (δ13C) approach

      Balal Yousaf, Guijian Liu, Ruwei Wang, Qumber Abbas, Muhammad Imtiaz and Ruijia Liu

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12401

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biochar reduces C-mineralization, resulting in greater C-sequestration compared with other BW amendments, and the magnitude of this effect initially increases and then decreases and stabilizes over time, possibly due to the presence of recalcitrant-C in biochar.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Carbon accrual rates, vegetation and nutrient dynamics in a regularly burned coppice woodland in Germany

      Nils Borchard, Timo Adolphs, Friederike Beulshausen, Brenton Ladd, Urs C. Gießelmann, Dominik Hegenberg, Bodo M. Möseler and Wulf Amelung

      Version of Record online: 1 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12408

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      Does soil aging affect the N2O mitigation potential of biochar? A combined microcosm and field study

      Nikolas Hagemann, Johannes Harter, Radina Kaldamukova, Ivan Guzman-Bustamante, Reiner Ruser, Simone Graeff, Andreas Kappler and Sebastian Behrens

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12390

  6. Platform

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The potential use of papyrus (Cyperus papyrus L.) wetlands as a source of biomass energy for sub-Saharan Africa

      Michael B. Jones, Frank Kansiime and Matthew J. Saunders

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12392

  7. Original Research

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      A realistic meteorological assessment of perennial biofuel crop deployment: a Southern Great Plains perspective

      Melissa Wagner, Meng Wang, Gonzalo Miguez-Macho, Jesse Miller, Andy VanLoocke, Justin E. Bagley, Carl J. Bernacchi and Matei Georgescu

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12403

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Genetic diversity of Miscanthus sinensis in US naturalized populations

      Yongli Zhao, Suma Basak, Christine E. Fleener, Marceline Egnin, Erik J. Sacks, Channapatna S. Prakash and Guohao He

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12404

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      Towards Miscanthus combustion quality improvement: the role of flowering and senescence

      Elaine Jensen, Paul Robson, Kerrie Farrar, Sian Thomas Jones, John Clifton-Brown, Roger Payne and Iain Donnison

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12391

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      The expansion of short rotation forestry: characterization of determinants with an agent-based land use model

      Jule Schulze, Erik Gawel, Henning Nolzen, Hanna Weise and Karin Frank

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12400

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      Climate impact assessment of willow energy from a landscape perspective: a Swedish case study

      Torun Hammar, Per-Anders Hansson and Cecilia Sundberg

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12399

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      Landscape control of nitrous oxide emissions during the transition from conservation reserve program to perennial grasses for bioenergy

      Debasish Saha, Benjamin M. Rau, Jason P. Kaye, Felipe Montes, Paul R. Adler and Armen R. Kemanian

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12395

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      Estimating product and energy substitution benefits in national-scale mitigation analyses for Canada

      Carolyn Smyth, Greg Rampley, Tony C. Lemprière, Olaf Schwab and Werner A. Kurz

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12389

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      Microbial communities and diazotrophic activity differ in the root-zone of Alamo and Dacotah switchgrass feedstocks

      Richard R. Rodrigues, Jinyoung Moon, Bingyu Zhao and Mark A. Williams

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12396

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      GHG emissions and other environmental impacts of indirect land use change mitigation

      Sarah J. Gerssen-Gondelach, Birka Wicke and Andre P. C. Faaij

      Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12394

  8. Original Researches

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      Assessing the potential to decrease the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone with Midwest US perennial cellulosic feedstock production

      Andy VanLoocke, Tracy E. Twine, Christopher J. Kucharik and Carl J. Bernacchi

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12385

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      Environmental performance of gasified willow from different lands including land-use changes

      Koldo Saez de Bikuña, Michael Zwicky Hauschild, Kim Pilegaard and Andreas Ibrom

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12378

  9. Original Research

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Bioenergy production and forest landscape change in the southeastern United States

      Jennifer K. Costanza, Robert C. Abt, Alexa J. McKerrow and Jaime A. Collazo

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12386

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      Projected gains and losses of wildlife habitat from bioenergy-induced landscape change

      Nathan M. Tarr, Matthew J. Rubino, Jennifer K. Costanza, Alexa J. McKerrow, Jaime A. Collazo and Robert C. Abt

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12383

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      Climate change mitigation potential of local use of harvest residues for bioenergy in Canada

      Carolyn Smyth, Werner A. Kurz, Greg Rampley, Tony C. Lemprière and Olaf Schwab

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12387

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      Evaluation of Agricultural Production Systems Simulator as yield predictor of Panicum virgatum and Miscanthus x giganteus in several US environments

      Jonathan J. Ojeda, Jeffrey J. Volenec, Sylvie M. Brouder, Octavio P. Caviglia and Mónica G. Agnusdei

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12384

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      Switchgrass growth and pine–switchgrass interactions in established intercropping systems

      Shiying Tian, Julian F. Cacho, Mohamed A. Youssef, George M. Chescheir, Milan Fischer, Jami E. Nettles and John S. King

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12381

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      Impact of drought stress on growth and quality of miscanthus for biofuel production

      Tim van der Weijde, Laurie M. Huxley, Sarah Hawkins, Eben Haeser Sembiring, Kerrie Farrar, Oene Dolstra, Richard G. F. Visser and Luisa M. Trindade

      Version of Record online: 18 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12382

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      Economic impact of combined torrefaction and pelletization processes on forestry biomass supply

      Yuanzhe Li, Peter Tittmann, Nathan Parker and Bryan Jenkins

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12375

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      Partitioning of ecosystem respiration of CO2 released during land-use transition from temperate agricultural grassland to Miscanthus × giganteus

      Jon P. McCalmont, Niall P. McNamara, Iain S. Donnison, Kerrie Farrar and John C. Clifton-Brown

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12380

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      Effects of biochar application on soil greenhouse gas fluxes: a meta-analysis

      Yanghui He, Xuhui Zhou, Liling Jiang, Ming Li, Zhenggang Du, Guiyao Zhou, Junjiong Shao, Xihua Wang, Zhihong Xu, Shahla Hosseini Bai, Helen Wallace and Chengyuan Xu

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12376

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      Belowground impacts of perennial grass cultivation for sustainable biofuel feedstock production in the tropics

      Yudai Sumiyoshi, Susan E. Crow, Creighton M. Litton, Jonathan L. Deenik, Andrew D. Taylor, Brian Turano and Richard Ogoshi

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12379

  10. Research Reviews

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      Socioeconomic indicators for sustainable design and commercial development of algal biofuel systems

      Rebecca A. Efroymson, Virginia H. Dale and Matthew H. Langholtz

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12359

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      Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds in biochar and biochar-amended soil: a review

      Tanushree Dutta, Eilhann Kwon, Satya Sundar Bhattacharya, Byong Hun Jeon, Akash Deep, Minori Uchimiya and Ki-Hyun Kim

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12363

  11. Original Research

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      Differences in field-scale N2O flux linked to crop residue removal under two tillage systems in cold climates

      Katelyn A. Congreves, Shannon E. Brown, Deanna D. Németh, Kari E. Dunfield and Claudia Wagner-Riddle

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/gcbb.12354

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