Biology of the Cell

Cover image for Vol. 106 Issue 4

Edited By: Thierry Galli, Paris, France

Impact Factor: 3.488

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2012: 82/185 (Cell Biology)

Online ISSN: 1768-322X

Featured

  • REVIEW: Regulation of with-no-lysine kinase signaling by Kelch-like proteins

    REVIEW: Regulation of with-no-lysine kinase signaling by Kelch-like proteins

    In 2001, with-no-lysine (WNK) kinases were identified as the genes responsible for the human hereditary hypertensive disease pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII). It took a further 6 years to clarify that WNK kinases participate in a signaling cascade with oxidative stress-responsive gene 1 (OSR1), Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK), and thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) in the kidney and the constitutive activation of this signaling cascade is the molecular basis of PHAII. Since this discovery, the WNK–OSR1/SPAK–NCC signaling cascade has been shown to be involved not only in PHAII but also in the regulation of blood pressure under normal and pathogenic conditions, such as hyperinsulinemia. However, the molecular mechanisms of WNK kinase regulation by dietary and hormonal factors and by PHAII-causing mutations remain poorly understood. In 2012, two additional genes responsible for PHAII, Kelch-like 3 (KLHL3) and Cullin3, were identified. At the time of their discovery, the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between these genes and their involvement in PHAII were unknown. Here we review the pathophysiological roles of the WNK signaling cascade clarified to date and introduce a new mechanism of WNK kinase regulation by KLHL3 and Cullin3, which provides insight on previously unknown mechanisms of WNK kinase regulation.

  • REVIEW: Mechanism and regulation of kinesin-5, an essential motor for the mitotic spindle

    REVIEW: Mechanism and regulation of kinesin-5, an essential motor for the mitotic spindle

    Mitotic cell division is the most fundamental task of all living cells. Cells have intricate and tightly regulated machinery to ensure that mitosis occurs with appropriate frequency and high fidelity. A core element of this machinery is the kinesin-5 motor protein, which plays essential roles in spindle formation and maintenance. In this review, we discuss how the structural and mechanical properties of kinesin-5 motors uniquely suit them to their mitotic role. We describe some of the small molecule inhibitors and regulatory proteins that act on kinesin-5, and discuss how these regulators may influence the process of cell division. Finally, we touch on some more recently described functions of kinesin-5 motors in non-dividing cells. Throughout, we highlight a number of open questions that impede our understanding of both this motor's function and the potential utility of kinesin-5 inhibitors.

  • REVIEW: Regulation of with-no-lysine kinase signaling by Kelch-like proteins
  • REVIEW: Mechanism and regulation of kinesin-5, an essential motor for the mitotic spindle

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Optogenetics Themed Issue

Optogenetics Themed Issue



Check out our themed issue of optogenetics papers published in Biology of the Cell, updated with new articles as and when they are published!
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March 2014
A novel mitochondrial nuclease-associated protein: A major executor of the programmed nuclear death in Tetrahymena thermophila
Eriko Osada et al.

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  • 2012 Impact Factor: 3.488
  • 2012 5-year Impact Factor: 4.016
  • 2012 Eigenfactor score: 0.00694
  • 2012 Immediacy Index: 0.729
  • 2012 Article Influence score: 1.564




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