Search Tips

Advanced Search

SEARCH OVERVIEW:

The Wiley Online Library offers several options for users to search across its collection of journals, books and laboratory protocols.

  1. Simple search is available on most pages of the site and provides the following search options
    1. All full text content on the site.
    2. Specific publications based on terms in the titles.
  2. Advanced search is available as a link from Basic search and allows users to create complex searches with the ability to limit searches to specific data fields and date ranges.
  3. Search in this title allows users to search the content of a specific journal, journal issue, book, or laboratory protocol.
  4. Citation search provides a search for articles based on citation information (Journal, volume, page, issue) as found in journal references.
  5. More like this links provides quick links for users to find
    1. Other articles by an author
    2. Articles similar to ones they are currently reading.

Regardless of which method you choose, the following features are available anytime you search the Wiley Online Library

AUTOMATIC STEMMING:

Anytime a user enters a term in one of the Wiley Online Library search boxes, the system performs automatic stemming of the term(s) eliminating the need for users to manually type several common variations of the search term. The chart below summarizes the common expansions the system will automatically find for English language terms. In addition, for our German language journals and books, German specific stemming rules are applied.

NOTE: Users can also search with wildcard characters to find a broader range of term variants. See “Search Conventions” chart below for more information on using wildcards (or truncation).

  1. BASIC STEMMING

    Search CLEAR (word root)

    • This search will find all of the following variants.
    • Searching any of these variants (e.g., CLEARED) will also find all term variants.
    Word root
    CLEAR
    word root + s (plural)
    CLEARS
    word root + ed (past tense)
    CLEARED
    word root + ing (gerund)
    CLEARING
    word root + er (comparative adjective)
    CLEARER
    word root + est (superlative adjective)
    CLEAREST
  2. COMMON BRITISH vs. AMERICAN ENGLISH SPELLING VARIANTS

    Search TUMOR

    Search CENTER

    • This search will find all of the following variants.
    • Searching any of these variants (e.g., TUMOUR) will also find all term variants.
    American English (singular)
    TUMOR
    CENTER
    American English (plural)
    TUMORS
    CENTERS
    British (singular)
    TUMOUR
    CENTRE
    British (plural)
    TUMOURS
    CENTRES
  3. NON-STANDARD PLURAL VARIANTS

    Search MOUSE

    • This search will find all of the following variants.
    • Searching any of these variants (e.g. MICE) will also find all term variants.
    Singular
    MOUSE
    Plural
    MICE
  4. COMMON IRREGULAR VERBS

    Search RUN

    • This search will find all of the following variants
    • Searching any of these variants (e.g. RAN) will also find all term variants.
    Irregular verb (past tense)
    RAN
    Verb (present tense)
    RUNS
    Verb (future tense)
    RUNNING

SEARCH CONVENTIONS

The following list contains information on how terms are processed by the search and conventions that can be used in your searches

How to search forExampleUse
Single termcloningSearches for specific term in article or selected fields. NOTE: Variants based on automatic stemming (see above) will also be found.
Multiple terms with a single letter wordAlan M TuringSearch terms that contain one character should be a phrase search. Use quotes e.g. “Alan M Turing”.
Multiple wordsdiabetes mellitusIf no quotes are used, search will “AND” terms and find articles or selected fields where both terms appear. NOTE: Variants based on automatic stemming (see above) will also be found.
Phrase Searching“diabetes mellitus”Use quotes to find exact phrases. This search finds the phrase diabetes mellitus in the article or selected fields.
“health maintenance organization”Automatic stemming is also applied for phrase searching so both singular and plural forms of the word will be found. In this case, health care organization or health care organizations will be found
Wildcard (or truncation)transplant*Use an asterisk (*) to match all terms beginning with a word root. Transplant* will match all terms beginning with the word transplant including but not limited to transplant, transplants, transplanting, transplantation, and transplantable. Your word root must contain at least three characters.
*glycemiaUse an asterisk (*) at the beginning of a word to match terms with the same suffix. *glycemia will match hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. The word root must have at least three characters.
leuk*miaUse an asterisk to match multiple characters within a word. leuk*mia will match both leukemia and leukaemia
wom?nUse a question mark (?) to match a single character within a word. wom?n will match women or woman
Hyphenated phrases“evidence based” DO NOT USE evidence-basedFor terms that generally are hyphenated in the text, e.g. evidence-based, do not include the hyphen when searching. Hyphen should be retained when searching ISSN or if used within a DOI
Logical operators in phrases“Food and Drug Administration”To find phrases which contain a logical operators (and,or not), search using quotes.

SUPPORT FOR LOGICAL (BOOLEAN) OPERATORS:

The following operators can be used in either the basic or the advanced search pages by entering them directly in the search box in uppercase (eg. AND) or by selecting them from the pull down boxes in the advanced search page.

OperatorExampleUse
ANDinsulin AND diabetesBoth terms MUST appear in the article or selected field(s).
ORheart OR cardiacAt least one of the terms must appear in the article or selected field(s)
NOTaids NOT hearingThe first word must appear but the second word cannot appear in the article or selected field(s)
ORDER OF PRECEDENCE NOT AND OR If your search contains more than one of these logical operators, the system will execute the search in the following order:
  1. All NOT operations first,
  2. All AND operations second
  3. All OR operations last
This order can be changed by using nesting (see next entry).
Grouping (or nesting)(kidney OR renal) AND dialysisDefault precedence order can be changed by using parentheses () to explicitly group searches using logical operators.

ADVANCED SEARCH FEATURES

FIELD SEARCHING

In addition to the above functionality, the advanced search page allows users to limit searches to specific fields. On the advanced search page, use the pull down menus to make field selections. The chart below lists the available fields for searching journals and books and provides suggestions and examples for finding

FieldExampleUse
All Fields“e coli” OR “Escherichia coli”Searches term(s) in all article fields. Searches can be single or multiple terms, phrases or complex searches using logical operators.
Publication-titleangewendte chemieSearches all journal and book titles for titles that contain your search term.
Article Titles“macular degeneration”Searches term(s) within the titles of journal articles and book chapters. Searches can be single or multiple terms, phrases or complex searches using logical operators.
Author(peter OR pe) AND druckerAuthor names may be presented with full first name or may only use the first few letters of the author’s first name with surname. When including first name in search, use both the full first name and the first few letters of the author’s first name when searching for specific authors.
Full Textrisk managementSearches term(s) within the full text of journal articles and book chapters. Searches can be single or multiple terms, phrases or complex searches using logical operators.
Abstractdistance learningSearches term(s) within the abstract of journal articles and book chapters. Searches can be single or multiple terms, phrases or complex searches using logical operators.
Author Affiliation “Stanford University” Spain USAWhen provided, this field contains additional information on the institutions authors are affiliated with. Use this field to search for specific institutions or geographic locations where research is being performed
KeywordsspectroscopySearches term(s) in the author provided keyword field. Searches can be single or multiple terms, phrases or complex searches using logical operators.
Funding AgencyNIH OR “National Institutes of Health”Use this field to find information on funding agency when provided. Search is not case sensitive. This information is supplied for journals only.
ISBN9780470756461International Book Standard Number assigned to books and reference works. Search without the hyphen.
ISSN1748-1708International Standard Serial Number assigned to journals. Search number with the hyphen.
Article DOI 10.1002/cncr.24944 DO NOT USE 10.1002/cncr* Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are unique ID’s assigned to each individual article in the Wiley Online Library. Search using the complete DOI. Wildcard searching is not supported with DOI
ReferencesSearch in this field to find cited authors and articles used in references.

DATE RANGE SEARCHING

The Advanced Search Page also allows users to limit their searches based on a series of date ranges which include

  • All Dates
  • Items added in the last 1-12 Months
  • Year range searching where user can specify the start and end year

SEARCH RESULTS

By using the pull down menu provided, search results can be sorted in two ways

  • Best match or relevancy (default)
  • Date

PRODUCT SPECIFIC SEARCH FEATURES

Besides these general search features which allow users to quickly search across all content on the Wiley Online Library, additional search options are included to help users find information within a specific publication more easily.

JOURNALS:

All journals allow the users to perform searches limited to just the content of the journal or the specific issue they are viewing. Users can access these features whenever they are browsing journal content by using the pull down menu on the search box and selecting either “in this journal” or “in this issue” option.

BOOKS:

Like journals, all books provide the option to search within the book. To access this feature, users must be browsing the content of the book they wish to search and select the “in this book” limit from the pull down menu on the search box

SELECT BOOKS and CURRENT PROTOCOLS:

Several of our larger encyclopedias and lab protocols published in the Current Protocols Series, have additional advanced search features that allow users to perform fielded searches and data range searches within the specific book or series. These products are identified by an additional link under the main search box labeled “Advanced product Search”. Selecting this link will take you to a custom “Advanced search” page for that title which allows users to access these additional search features.

IMPROVING YOUR SEARCH RESULTS

TOO MANY RESULTS

  • Try limiting search terms to title, abstracts and keyword fields for more relevant results.
  • If wildcards have been used, review terms being retrieved to make sure unwanted variations are not being picked up.
  • Review terms you are searching to see if they are too broad or might have multiple meanings introducing irrelevant results.
  • Consider refining your search by adding additional concepts using the “AND” operator.
  • Use date limits to restrict search to most recent data.

TOO FEW RESULTS

  • Search in all fields.
  • Search terms may be too specific. Consider adding additional variants or synonyms for the concepts you are looking for using the “OR” operator.
  • Find an article of interest and select “more articles like this link” on the abstract page.
  • Find an article of interest and use the “more by this author link” on the abstract view to find other papers by the author.
  • Use wildcards to find additional variants of your search term.
  • If simply entering terms in the search box, all terms will be connected using the “AND” operator requiring all terms to appear in the article. Review your search terms and determine if this logic is too restrictive. Considering using the “OR” operator for optional terms.
  • If using logical operators, consider using nesting to clearly define your search intent.
  • Topic might be very specific without much written on it.

SEARCH