Evolution

IUBS_evolutionary biology


31st IUBS

The 31st IUBS General Assembly and Conference on Biological Sciences and Bioindustry will be held in July 2012 at Suzhou, China. Please read our Virtual Issue from Wiley-Blackwell journals and book relevant to the conference.

 

Jeff MCNEELYHighlight from Jeffrey McNeely, Former Chief Scientist, IUCN, Swaziland, (E-mail: Jeff.McNEELY@iucn.org): Biological diversity is the living wealth of our planet, at the level of genes, species, and ecosystems. Conservation biology seeks to provide the scientific basis for the conservation of this natural wealth. The key issues that this session will address include the role of biodiversity in supporting ecosystem services (the benefits people receive from ecosystems, such as watershed protection, pollination, and providing fisheries); the contribution of biodiversity in adapting to climate change and mitigating its effects; the economic benefits of biodiversity; new approaches to managing biodiversity at gene, species, and ecosystem levels; the latest insights into the consequences of biodiversity loss for the functioning of ecosystems; and the contribution of biodiversity to human health, agriculture, and other aspects of human wellbeing.

IUBS Virtual Issue – Evolution, Biodiversity and Conservation (More articles for further reading)

Lethaia
free logoEvolution of Paleocene to Early Eocene larger benthic foraminifer assemblages of the Indus Basin, Pakistan
JAWAD AFZAL, MARK WILLIAMS, MELANIE J. LENG, RICHARD J. ALDRIDGE, MICHAEL H. STEPHENSON
Lethaia
WIREs Membrane
free logoEvolution of P2X receptors
Geoffrey Burnstock, Alexei Verkhratsky
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Membrane Transport and Signaling
Purines appear to be the most primitive and widespread chemical messengers in all Eucarya. P2X ion channel receptors appeared early in evolution, but their absence in some animal groups suggests that some novel receptors are still to be discovered.
Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B
free logoLinking the molecular evolution of avian beta (β) keratins to the evolution of feathers
Matthew J. Greenwold, Roger H. Sawyer
Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution
Discoveries of “feathered dinosaurs” continue to stimulate interest in the evolutionary origin of feathers. The results found here demonstrate that the evolutionary origin of feathers does not coincide with the molecular evolution of the feather β-keratins found in modern birds.
Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A
free logoAcute and Persistent Effects of Pre- and Posthatching Thermal Environments on Growth and Metabolism in the Red-Eared Slider Turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans
DAY B. LIGON, CHARLES C. PETERSON, MATTHEW B. LOVERN
Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Ecological Genetics and Physiology
The results of this study suggest that metabolic compensation was reversible regardless of the life stage during which exposure occurred, and therefore is more appropriately considered acclimational than organizational.
Evolutionary Anthropology
free logoSpecial Issue: The Turkana Basin
Edited by: Richard Leakey
Evolutionary Anthropology
Natural Resource Modeling
free logoMathematical modeling of viral zoonoses in wildlife
L. J. S. ALLEN, V. L. BROWN, C. B. JONSSON, S. L. KLEIN, S. M. LAVERTY, K. MAGWEDERE, J. C. OWEN and P. VAN DEN DRIESSCHE
Natural Resource Modeling
Zoonoses are a worldwide public health concern, accounting for approximately 75% of human infectious diseases while also adversely affecting agricultural production and wildlife. We review some mathematical models developed for the study of viral zoonoses in wildlife and identify areas where further modeling efforts are needed.
Conservation Biology
free logoBolder Thinking for Conservation
Reed F. Noss, et al
Conservation Biology
Unfortunately, the biodiversity targets for the year 2020 developed at the 2010 Nagoya Conference of the Convention on Biological Diversity fall short of what is needed to maintain the “ecosystem services” upon which Perrings et al. (2010) suggest human welfare and economic well-being depend. This article discusses strategies for better setting biodiversity protection targets.
The Journal of Wildlife Management
free logoA model for integrating wildlife science and agri-environmental policy in the conservation of declining species
Noah G. Perlut, Allan M. Strong and Toby J. Alexander
The Journal of Wildlife Management
We examined a case study where a successful wildlife-friendly model for intensively managed hayland was developed from field data and implemented locally as policy by a federal agency. Data collection, analyses, and communication processes served as an effective global model for practitioners to apply to other agricultural products and taxa.
Wildlife Society Bulletin
free logoCan restoring wolves aid in lynx recovery?
William J. Ripple, Aaron J. Wirsing, Robert L. Beschta and Steven W. Buskirk
Wildlife Society Bulletin
We examine the hypothesis that relatively low densities of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) and the imperiled status of lynx (Lynx canadensis) may be partially due to an ecological cascade caused by the extirpation of gray wolves (Canis lupus) in most of the conterminous United States decades ago.
Evolution
free logoDevelopmental trait evolution in Trilobites
Fusco, G., Garland, T., Hunt, G., and N. C. Hughes
Evolution
This is a state-of-the art phylogenetic comparative analysis of growth parameters estimated from more than 75 fossil Trilobite species. The authors conclude that growth rates in Trilobites were similar to those of living arthropods and follow Dyar's rule, but that most developmental traits were quite labile across species and over evolutionary history.
Journal of Systematics and Evolution
free logoIntegrating Early Cretaceous fossils into the phylogeny of living angiosperms: Magnoliidae and eudicots
James A. DOYLE and Peter K. ENDRESS
Journal of Systematics and Evolution
IUBMB Life
free logoOrigin and evolution of the genetic code: The universal enigma
Eugene V. Koonin, Artem S. Novozhilov
IUBMB Life
BioFactors
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
free logoEcotypes and the controversy over stages in the formation of new species
DAVID B. LOWRY
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
This review address key questions in current thinking on the evolution of species: What is the role of ecology in species formation? What are the stages in the evolution of species? Is speciation is reversible and, if so, how does it become irreversible?
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society
free logoMolecular phylogeny and divergence times of Hormaphidinae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) indicate Late Cretaceous tribal diversification
XIAO-LEI HUANG, JING-GONG XIANG-YU, SHAN-SHAN REN, RUI-LING ZHANG, YA-PING ZHANG, GE-XIA QIAO
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society
To reconstruct major phylogenetic relationships and to understand the evolution of host association patterns for major lineages, we present the first detailed molecular phylogeny of Hormaphidinae, as inferred from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences. Divergence times estimated using a Bayesian approach indicate that tribal diversifications occurred during the Late Cretaceous and were coincident with the appearance of their primary host plants.
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
free logoGenetic differences among populations in sexual dimorphism: evidence for selection on males in a dioecious plant
Q. YU, E. D. ELLEN, M. J. WADE, L. F. DELPH
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Methods in Ecology and Evolution
free logoSpatial analysis by distance indices: an alternative local clustering index for studying spatial patterns
Li Baohua; Madden Laurence V.; Xu Xiangming
Methods in Ecology and Evolution
New Phytologist
 

Read our Wiley book on Evolutionary Biology

     
 An Introduction to Behavioural 

An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology Edited by Nicholas B. Davies, John R. Krebs, Stuart A. West ISBN: 978-1-4051-1416-5 (Read Sample Chapter)

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