Social Psychology

John Turner's work and influence


British Journal of Social Psychology

European Journal of Social Psychology

BJSP & EJSP Joint Virtual Special Issue: John Turner’s work and its impact on social psychology
Edited by Alex Haslam, Stephen Reicher and Katherine Reynolds

John Turner, whose pioneering work on social identity and self-categorization theories changed the face of modern social psychology, died in July 2011. This unique virtual special issue celebrates Turner’s life and work by reproducing a number of key articles that were published in the British Journal of Social Psychology and the European Journal of Social Psychology over the course of his career.

Editorial

Haslam, S. A., Reicher, S. D. & Reynolds, K. J. (2012) Identity, influence and change: The life and work of John Turner

Section 1. Key articles on which John Turner was senior author

Turner, J. C. (1975). Social comparison and social identity: Some prospects for intergroup behaviour
European Journal of Social Psychology, 5, 5-34

Turner, J. C. & Oakes, P. J. (1986). The significance of the social identity concept for social psychology with reference to individualism, interactionism and social influence
British Journal of Social Psychology, 25, 237-252

Turner, J. C. (2005). Explaining the nature of power: A three-process theory
European Journal of Social Psychology, 35, 1-22

Section 2. Key articles that John Turner co-authored with colleagues and students

Turner, J. C., Brown, R. J., & Tajfel, H. (1979). Social comparison and group interest in ingroup favouritism
European Journal of Social Psychology, 9, 187-204

Hogg, M. A., & Turner, J. C. (1985). Interpersonal attraction, social identification and psychological group formation
European Journal of Social Psychology, 15, 51-66

Abrams, D., Wetherell, M. S., Cochrane, S., Hogg, M. A. & Turner, J. C. (1990). Knowing what to think by knowing who you are: Self-categorization and the nature of norm formation, conformity and group polarization
British Journal of Social Psychology, 29, 97-119

Oakes, P. J., Turner, J. C. and S. A. Haslam (1991). Perceiving people as group members: The role of fit in the salience of social categorizations
British Journal of Social Psychology, 30, 125-144

McGarty, C., Turner, J. C., Oakes, P. J., & Haslam, S. A. (1993). The creation of uncertainty in the influence process: The roles of stimulus information and disagreement with similar others
European Journal of Social Psychology, 23, 17-38

David, B., & Turner, J. C. (1996). Studies in self-categorization and minority conversion: Is being a member of the outgroup an advantage?
British Journal of Social Psychology, 35, 179-199

Haslam, S.A., Turner, J.C., Oakes, P.J., Reynolds, K.J., Eggins, R.A., Nolan, M. & Tweedie, J. (1998). When do stereotypes become really consensual? Investigating the group-based dynamics of the consensualization process
European Journal of Social Psychology, 28, 755- 776

Onorato, R. S. & Turner, J. C. (2004). Fluidity in the self-concept: The shift from personal to social identity
European Journal of Social Psychology, 34, 257-278

Reynolds, K.J., Turner, J.C., Haslam, S.A., Ryan, M. K., Bizumic, B. & Subasic, E. (2007). Does personality explain ingroup identification and discrimination? Evidence form the minimal group paradigm
British Journal of Social Psychology, 46, 517-539

Section 3. Key papers in which John Turner commented on the work of others

Turner, J. C. (1980). Fairness or discrimination in intergroup behaviour [a reply to Branthwaite, Doyle, & Lightbown]
European Journal of Social Psychology, 10, 131-147

Turner, J. C. (1988). Comments on Doise’s Individual and social identities in intergroup relations
European Journal of Social Psychology, 18, 113-116

Turner, J. C & Reynolds, K. J. (2003). Why social dominance theory has been falsified [a reply to Schmitt, Branscombe & Kappen, 2003]
British Journal of Social Psychology, 42, 199-206

Turner, J. C. (2006). Tyranny, freedom and social structure: Escaping our theoretical prisons [a reply to Reicher & Haslam, 2006]
British Journal of Social Psychology, 45, 41-46