The Journal of Anatomy seeks to advance the understanding of all aspects of human and comparative anatomy through the analysis of structure, function, development, and evolution. We publish original papers, invited review articles, and book reviews. Priority is given to studies clearly demonstrating relevance to the anatomical community. Our articles cover all levels of morphology from cells to whole organisms. The journal is proudly sponsored by The Anatomical Society.

New Editor-in-Chief, Evie Vereecke

New Editor-in-Chief, Evie Vereecke

Evie Vereecke is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven, Belgium. She leads the Jan Palfijn Anatomy Lab at Campus Kulak, specializing in comparative biomechanics and functional anatomy of primates, including humans. Employing an interdisciplinary approach, Prof. Vereecke’s team integrates techniques such as medical imaging, computational modeling, and detailed dissections to deepen our understanding of form-function relationships in the musculoskeletal system. The research is often framed in an evolutionary context.

Alongside her research, Evie instructs various anatomy courses within the Bachelor's programs in medicine and physiotherapy. She is specialised in postcranial anatomy, with particular focus on the extremities, but remains amazed by the intricate details of the human body as seen during dissection. Additionally, Evie serves as the program director for the Bachelor's degree in Medicine at Campus Kulak in which role she is responsible for the medical curriculum.



The Anatomical Society announces the appointment of a new Early Career Researcher Editorial Board

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The Journal of Anatomy Best Paper Prize (anatsoc.org.uk)

2022 Award

Journal of Anatomy Best Paper Award

Precision mouse models of Yars/dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type C and Sptlc1/hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 


Timothy J. Hines, Abigail L. D. Tadenev, Museer A. Lone, Courtney L. Hatton, Inseyah Bagasrawala, Morgane G. Stum, Kathy E. Miers, Thorsten Hornemann, Robert W. Burgess 

Journal of Anatomy, Volume 241, Issue 5, November 2022, Pages 1169-1185

Journal of Anatomy: Vol 241, No 5 (wiley.com)

Journal of Anatomy Runner-Up Best Paper Prize

Comprehensive expression analysis for the core cell cycle regulators in the chicken embryo reveals novel tissue-specific synexpression groups and similarities and differences with expression in mouse, frog and zebrafish

Marta Alaiz Noya, Federica Berti, Susanne Dietrich

Journal of Anatomy, Volume 241, Issue 1, July 2022, Pages 42– 66 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/14697580/2022/241/1

 

Award of Anatomical Society Studentships

2024/25 Round

We are seeking applications from the Anatomical Society Membership for the 2024/25 round (student start date 1st October 2025).

Application details can be found here: Read more about the 2024/25 Research Studentships.

 

Articles

REVIEW ARTICLE
Open access

Revisiting the anatomy of the left ventricle in the light of knowledge of its development

  •  17 April 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

The image shows how the left ventricle of the human heart can be assessed in terms of its inlet, apical and outlet components. The ventricle has been opened through a superior incision parallel to the anterior interventricular groove. The roof of the ventricle is formed by the area of fibrous continuity between the leaflets of the aortic and mitral valves, which is thickened at its ends to form the right and left fibrous trigoes (white triangles with black borders). The outlet component is complex, extending beyond the so-called echocardiographic ‘annulus’, which in reality is no more than a virtual basal ring, to reach the level of the sinutubular junction. Note the infero-septal recess of the outflow tract, which interposes between the leaflets of the mitral valve and the septum.

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Open access

Investigating the role connective tissue fibroblasts play in the altered muscle anatomy associated with the limb abnormality, Radial Dysplasia

  •  16 April 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Type III collagen is abundant in the endo and perimysium of control patient muscle (A and E) but is downregulated in RD muscle (I and M).

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Open access

Microanatomy of the human tunnel of Corti structures and cochlear partition‐tonotopic variations and transcellular signaling

  •  13 April 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Mid-modiolar semi-thin section of a human cochlea with tonotopic estimates based on synchrotron 3-D imaging.

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Comparative skeletal anatomy of salt marsh and western harvest mice in relation to locomotor ecology

  •  13 April 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

We used micro-CT to compare post-cranial skeletal anatomy between the salt marsh and western harvest mouse, to examine whether the salt marsh harvest mouse's restriction to brackish marshes is associated with skeletal adaptations for scansorial locomotion. We found that salt marsh harvest mice exhibited a deeper 3rd caudal vertebra, a more caudally located longest tail vertebra, cranio-caudally longer tail vertebrae, and a longer digit III proximal phalanx than western harvest mice. These phalangeal and vertebral characteristics are known to decrease body rotations during climbing, increase contact with substrates, and decrease fall susceptibility in arboreal mammals, suggesting that the salt marsh harvest mouse may be morphologically specialized for scansorial locomotion, adaptive for its dynamic wetland environment.

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Open access

Structure and scaling of the middle ear in domestic dog breeds

  •  11 April 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Middle ear structural dimensions in dog breeds are more closely correlated with skull length than width. Although they scale with negative allometry, the St Bernard's middle ear cavity is still 14 times larger than that of a Chihuahua. Surprisingly, these substantial size differences are not reflected in existing canine audiograms.

More articles
free access

The anatomical basis for transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation

  •  588-611
  •  19 November 2019

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

A schematic diagram of the approximate intracranial relationships between the facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves.

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