Aging Cell is an open access geroscience journal publishing research addressing the biology of aging. The journal welcomes research that reports the mechanistic, molecular, and cellular aspects of the aging process, as well as the links between aging and age-related disease.

With global readership, Aging Cell is a journal of The Anatomical Society and John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

 

  • Rilmenidine extends lifespan and healthspan in Caenorhabditis elegans via a nischarin I1-imidazoline receptor

    Dominic F. Bennett, Anita Goyala, Cyril Statzer, Charles W. Beckett, Alexander Tyshkovskiy, Vadim N. Gladyshev, Collin Y. Ewald, João Pedro de Magalhães

    Aging Cell, Volume 22, Issue 2, February 2023, Pages 1-15

    Accepted Dec 09, 2022. First published: 20 January 2023

    https://doi.org/10.1111/acel.13774

  • A single short reprogramming early in life initiates and propagates an epigenetically related mechanism improving fitness and promoting an increased healthy lifespan

    Quentin Alle, Enora Le Borgne, Paul Bensadoun, Camille Lemey, Nelly Béchir, Mélissa Gabanou, Fanny Estermann, Christelle Bertrand-Gaday, Laurence Pessemesse, Karine Toupet, Romain Desprat, Jérôme Vialaret, Christophe Hirtz, Danièle Noël, Christian Jorgensen, François Casas, Ollivier Milhavet, Jean-Marc Lemaitre

    Aging Cell, Volume 21, Issue 11, November 2022, Pages 1-12

    Accepted Aug 31, 2022. First published: 17 October 2022

    https://doi.org/10.1111/acel.13714

  • NEW RESEARCH STUDENTSHIPS 2023/24 - AWARDED FOR START DATE 01.10.24

    Award of Anatomical Society Studentships

    The Anatomical Society is delighted to announce the award of two new research studentships. These awards are the outcome of the Society’s annual studentship competition open to its members. Studentships will start in October 2024 and each award funds 3 years of postgraduate training and study towards a PhD. Studentships provide funding for research focused on specific projects associated with anatomical science. For details of these funded projects, please click here.

Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE
Open access

Transcriptomic and intervention evidence reveals domestic dogs as a promising model for anti‐inflammatory investigation

  •  1 March 2024

Graphical Abstract

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We profiled age-related transcriptome of domestic dogs and found that inflammation-associated genes are significantly differentially expressed. We further treated aged dogs with canine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), nicotinamide mononucleotide, and rapamycin, all of which can significantly reduce the proinflammatory factors in plasma (e.g., IL-6 and TNF-α). Of note is that MSCs effectively improved the heart function and reversed the expression of some age- and inflammation-related genes in aged dogs, suggesting domestic dogs as a promising model for anti-inflammatory investigation.

COMMENTARY
Open access

The cellular bases of mobility from the Study of Muscle, Mobility and Aging (SOMMA)

  •  1 March 2024

Graphical Abstract

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This issue of Aging Cell includes results from the Study of Muscle, Mobility and Aging (SOMMA) about cellular processes involved in mobility in older people. Adding to previous studies from SOMMA and from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) about the the important role of mitochondrial energetics, these papers find associations of oxidative modification of myocelluar proteins, antioxidant enzymes, autophagy and denervation with lower strength, fitness, and muscle mass. These represent the value of cellular epidemiology in the study of human aging.

RESEARCH ARTICLE
Open access

Effects from medications on functional biomarkers of aging in three longitudinal studies of aging in Sweden

  •  1 March 2024

Graphical Abstract

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Adrenergics/inhalants, lipid-modifying agents, and selective calcium channel blockers with mainly vascular effects may benefit functional biomarkers of aging (functional aging index, cognitive function, and frailty index). Their effects could be due to positive pleiotropic effects related to better cellular and physiological performance.

RESEARCH ARTICLE
Open access

Inhibition of 26S proteasome activity by α-synuclein is mediated by the proteasomal chaperone Rpn14/PAAF1

  •  28 February 2024

Graphical Abstract

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α-Synuclein (α-syn) is a hallmark protein of Parkinson's disease. It affects multiple protein stabilities disturbing cellular proteostasis. α-Synuclein interacts in yeast with the proteasomal chaperone Rpn14, which corresponds to mammalian PAAF1. Activities of the 26S proteasome are inhibited by α-syn through Rpn14/PAAF1. This impact on proteostasis strongly correlates with α-syn phosphorylation at S129. Rpn14/PAAF1 is a newly identified key factor functioning as link between α-syn and cytotoxicity based on disturbances in cellular proteostasis as it is found in Parkinson's disease.

RESEARCH ARTICLE
Open access

Enhanced TRPC3 transcription through AT1R/PKA/CREB signaling contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular epithelial cells in D-galactose-induced accelerated aging mice

  •  28 February 2024

Graphical Abstract

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During aging, dysregulated Sirt1/AT1R/CREB signaling promotes TRPC3 transcription in renal tubular epithelial cells. TRPC3 upregulation mediates mitochondrial calcium overload, mitochondrial redox imbalance, and respiratory dysfunction, leading to accelerated renal aging. TRPC3 deficiency partially ameliorates aging-associated renal disorders and is a potential therapeutic target.

More articles

The following is a list of the most cited articles based on citations published in the last three years, according to CrossRef.

Open access

Oxidative stress in the aging substantia nigra and the etiology of Parkinson's disease

  •  20 August 2019

Graphical Abstract

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Dopamine neurons within the healthy human substantia nigra exhibit mild oxidative stress during aging, resulting from their unique biochemical properties and a number of age-dependent biochemical changes specific to this neuronal population (grey). An exacerbation of these pathways, combined with additional environmental toxins and genetic mutations, worsens redox balance within nigral dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease, causing excessive oxidative stress and dopamine neuron death (red).

Open access

Measuring biological aging in humans: A quest

  •  12 December 2019

Graphical Abstract

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Finding a reference metric for the rate of biological aging is key to understanding the molecular nature of the aging process. Defining and validating this metric in humans opens the door to a new kind of medicine that will overcome the limitation of current disease definitions. We will then be able to approach health in a global perspective and bring life course preventative measures to the center of attention.

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