Overview

The European Journal of Immunology (EJI) is an official journal of EFIS. Established in 1971, EJI continues to serve the needs of the global immunology community covering basic, translational and clinical research, ranging from adaptive and innate immunity through to vaccines and immunotherapy, cancer, autoimmunity, allergy and more. Mechanistic insights and thought-provoking immunological findings are of interest, as are studies using the latest omics technologies. We offer fast track review for competitive situations, including recently scooped papers, format free submission, transparent and fair peer review and more as detailed in our policies.


European Journal of Immunology is inviting applications for the role of Editor-in-Chief

We are excited to be seeking a new Editor-in-Chief to build on the journal’s strong foundations and continue to develop as a core community resource. The deadline for applications is May 1st 2024. Please click here for further details about the role and how to apply.


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Articles

Cover Picture
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Cover Story: Eur. J. Immunol. 4'24

  •  12 April 2024

Graphical Abstract

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Our cover features images related to flow cytometry techniques widely used for analysis of function and phenotypes of major human and murine immune cell subsets, superimposed on a multidimensional immune cell population scatter plot. These images are taken from the third edition of EJI's Flow Cytometry Guidelines (Cossarizza et al. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/eji.202170126), a comprehensive resource prepared by flow cytometry and immunology research experts from around the world.

Impressum

Impressum

  •  12 April 2024
Research Article|Basic
Open access

Vitamin A‐treated natural killer cells reduce interferon‐gamma production and support regulatory T‐cell differentiation

  •  9 April 2024

Graphical Abstract

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When exposed to Vitamin A, NK cells change their transcriptome, phenotype, and metabolism. Vitamin A curtails NK-cell IFN-γ production via IL-18R-mTOR-cMyc-IKbζ pathway. Furthermore, vitamin A-treated NK cells support the differentiation and proliferation of FoxP3-expressing regulatory T and Th17 cells.

Short Communication|Clinical
Open access

Predominance of M2 macrophages in organized thrombi in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension patients

  •  9 April 2024

Graphical Abstract

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In chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) patients, thrombi are classified as fresh thrombi (FT) or organized thrombi (OT), based on the degree of fibrosis and remodeling. Our immune multiplex staining revealed a shift from unpolarized to M2 macrophages in OT, offering insights into dynamic macrophage biology in CTEPH.

Research Article|Basic
Open access

Proinflammatory polarization strongly reduces human macrophage in vitro phagocytosis of tumor cells in response to CD47 blockade

  •  9 April 2024

Graphical Abstract

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We investigated if macrophage polarization regulates phagocytosis of cancer cells in response to CD47 blockade in vitro. Using flow cytometry-based and fluorescence live-cell imaging-based phagocytosis assays, we observed that proinflammatory polarization with IFN-γ+LPS upregulated multiple phagocytosis checkpoints and impaired human monocyte-derived macrophage phagocytosis of cancer cells. Figure created with BioRender.com.

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The following is a list of the most cited articles based on citations published in the last three years, according to CrossRef.

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CD69: from activation marker to metabolic gatekeeper

  •  946-953
  •  5 May 2017

Graphical Abstract

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CD69 associates to LAT1 and controls its plasma membrane expression and amino acid transporter activity in T lymphocytes.

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Targeting Treg cells in cancer immunotherapy

  •  1140-1146
  •  30 June 2019

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Regulatory T (Treg) cells highly infiltrate into various tumor tissues and hinder immune responses against tumor cells by effector T (Teff) cells. To effectively enhance anti-tumor immunity, it is essential to selectively remove tumor-infiltrating Treg cells while preserving tumor-reactive Teff cells.

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